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RatherBeRiding

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About RatherBeRiding

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    TT Member

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  • Location
    Idaho
  1. I live in Idaho and have had good luck working with Mototech in Boise. I do have the luxury of being able to walk in and talk to folks which may not be the case in your situation. I end up ordering many of the parts I need. Given the rapid technology churn on bikes today, I really do not expect that a dealer is going to stock non-maintenance items for every year and model, especially in a market as small as Idaho. On the parts I do order, the delivery time seems reasonable and they are very good about following up to let me know when the parts are in.
  2. The issue with the nuts spinning in the frame on the side cover is due to the rivet-nuts not being clinched tight enough. Best way to describe what these are is a www.mcmaster.com part number: 95105A183 There is a special tool to crimp these correctly, but I ended up building a gizmo that threaded into the 6mm rivit-nut through a hole drilled in a 3/8" fine thread bolt. A nut on the 3/8" bolt is used to pull the 6mm bolt and crimp the flange tighter. Sort of hard to explain, but I can send a picture of the tool if you send a PM.
  3. Make sure the washer is under the hex head screw holding this in. I forgot this once and it bent the screen. It straightened out OK, but I picked up a new one anyway.
  4. It was mentioned earlier in the thread, but if you are using a clicker type torque wrench, definitely check the calibration. I really only believe the beam type wrenches.
  5. For what it's worth, I'll be riding sweep on a Husky.
  6. 44, currently ride an 05 TE250, previous Huskys included: 77 CR125, 87 TE430, 89 XC(? cross country)510, 91 WR125
  7. Wow, they put guard rails and retaining walls on dirt roads??
  8. I ran a cross country race last weekend on my 05 TE250. Somewhere around 45 miles with maybe 30 percent of the course being deep sand. There were also a half dozen long WFO hill climbs. I did not hit reserve. Jetting is a 42 pilot, 170 main and the accelerator pump set up with about a one second squirt duration. 25 miles should be no problem at all.
  9. So it has been a while since I have done an enduro, how does this start/control format "no timekeeping" thing mentioned in the flyer work? It mentions jart charts so just curious how the event is run. Last time I rode a timekeeper, it was an ICO odometer and about four of those cheap LCD clocks velcroed to the crossbar. Usually one or two of the clocks would break, either on their own or in one of the many crashes.
  10. Do any of the street capable Huskys (TE, SM) run a cush drive rear hub? I am not sure about the new street legal EXC KTMs, but the LC4 dual sport and Supermoto models all ran dampers in the drive hub to reduce shock loading on the gears. Unfortunately this does not help your situation, but you wonder if there is something else going on besides just random bad gears.
  11. I have a TE250 and specifically purchased it because a small bore forces you to hone your riding skills, expecially in areas with a variety of terrain conditions. On a big bore, generally the solution to most every problem is more throttle. Screw up on a hill, no problem, just slow down, correct your line and gas it. On a small bore, this is generally not an option. You pretty much have to attack things. A big bore allows you to get lazy and in my opinion, ride less aggresively. Another upside of the smaller bike is that as you get tired later in the day and throttle control skills fade, it is more forgiving and wears you out less. I had a 430 and then an old 510 husky for quite a while. I switched over to a 125 after that an noticed that after 60 trail miles or so, I still wanted to gas up and go for another loop on the small bore. On the big bores, I was usually digging for a beer in the cooler. There is no right or wrong and I think it is good to switch back and forth to keep your skills up. Having said all that, my TE250 is miserable on the road. I hate to spin something that fast in a sustained mode. If I thought I was going to regularly spend anything over a mile or so on 50+ MPH road I would get the bigger bike.
  12. Put one on my '05 TE250 and it fit up well. I will probably have to pull it off for oil changes but that is not a major concern as it seems easy enough to do. The material seems pretty rugged but so far I have really done nothing to test that. I had a plastic plate on my previous bike and it held up well through years of abuse. The Hyde plate does not have any ventilation holes. I am not sure this is significant from a cooling perspective. When next summer rolls around, I may hook up a few thermocouples and test with and without the plate to see. For the next few months, definitely not a concern as daytime temps are only in the mid 30's.
  13. Mine did the same thing. ODO said MPH, but the readings were in KPH. I just corrected the wheel size to compensate, but I probably should have tried selecting KPH to see if they are just reversed. Bike is an 05 TE250.
  14. There was a previous thread on the oil lubrication holes in the '06 TE250 piston not being drilled correctly resulting in piston damage. http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=396626
  15. .