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      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

corndog67

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About corndog67

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    California
  1. I use a DID VM oring, and a steel outer rear stealth, and haven't had to adjust it in about 4 rides, whereas my stock stuff wore out in 200 miles or so, needing adjustment a couple of times per ride.
  2. A couple of details. A top fuel engine is 500 cubic inches. Approximately 8000HP, going by computer models, since there isn't a dyno in the world that will measure them. All pistons are CNC machined after the forging or casting process.
  3. I got mine from Yamaha in 3 days. Are you sure that Yamaha GYTR sells Stealhy? It didn't say anything on the flywheel or the packaging that it was Stealhy.
  4. And those KTM's are about $8000.
  5. I've got the larger one, on my 06. It's much more predictable now, especially coming out of slippery corners, and also doesn't stall as easily. Or maybe my hamfoot is getting more used to the rear brake.
  6. I'm a machinist by trade, and I would assume that there is a clearance issue somewhere in there. The galling on those thrust surfaces isn't good, and I would assume that the bearing is toast also. Another indicator would be that your prior clutch wasn't releasing right, there might be an assembly issue going on inside your cases. I know on previous bikes that I owned, I had to take one of them apart a few times in a row before I found out that a previous owner/wrench had left out a thrust washer and things just didn't fit right when I got to the end of the assembly process. I wouldn't run it until you are absolutely surethat things are working like they are supposed to. It can get expensive.
  7. I do machine work, and a couple of years ago, I put a set of 16" wheels off of a 600 Ninja, must have been an older one, 80's - 90's on a KX500 for a guy. We had to machine the sprocket carrier itself, the wheel where the sprocket carrier rode with the cush drive inserts, there seemed to be plenty of meat in there to narrow things up, took careful measurements as far as centering things up in the swingarm and also machined both side of the wheel on the front to get it between the forks, and made some lugs that a friend of his welded to the lower legs for the calipers to mount. I was skeptical when we started, but it turned out really well, except now, I would use maybe some SV650 wheels, or newer GS500 wheels, since they are 17", but still not real wide like the big bores that run 180 tires. The 16" wheels used a 120 on the front and a 150 or 160 on the rear. Oh yeah, a KX500 on the street is a handful.
  8. I live in the lovely state of Califorkya, how did you manage to get those YZ's street legal? I've actually thought of try to bootleg something through, just using a plate off of something else, and making the YZ appear street legal, see, the cops around here are so busy with gangs and dope and whatnot that I don't think they would mess with little ole me on my dirtbike. What's the scoop on street legalizing these bad boys?
  9. When I ordered my chain the other day, it was only $6.00 more for an extra master link.
  10. When I get a new chain (I'm anxiously awaiting a DID 520VM X-ring), I always order a spare master link and keep it in the tool roll. Someone else usually ends up needing it, but I get a spare every time I buy a new chain. You would think I would end up having 20 or 30 of them laying around after all these years, but there are only a couple in the tool box. I always make sure that I have the right one for the bike I'm riding.
  11. 06 YZ450F, skid plate, hand guards, 9 oz. flywheel, O-ring chain, stock gearing, it does anything I need it to do, I may go to a 50 or 51 tooth on the back, but as it is, IT WORKS.
  12. I just put the 9oz. Yamaha GYTR flywheel on my 06 450F, it doesn't stall as easily, it actually seems to start easier (might just be a figment of my imagination, but it is a first kick starter, nearly all the time), and it smoothed the hit out a bit. I like it.
  13. I've got an 06 450F, brand new left over. Less than 200 miles. Did the first maintenance, and things are looking good. I've noticed that, I believe Boyeson, advertising higher flow covers and impellers, and also a company advertising high capacity radiators. Things are starting to get hot at my regular riding area's, and although I've not had any cooling problems yet, are these mods a good idea or even necessary? What have you guys's experiences been with the cooling on the later model 450's? My buddies sometimes have boiling problems on their Honda's, but to date, my Yammer has been trouble free. Thanks for any and all replies. Robert.
  14. I am a machinist that used to work in a fabrication/machine shop, now just machining. Do you know how much stuff I have had to repair/replace because people covered it in JBWeld? They should license that stuff, and only sell it to people that know what its for. Don't use it. Fix it right. I've seen engines that blew up because someone tried to fix a broken cam chain tensioner with JB. I've seen ears broken off of transmissions on Caterpillars that were JB Welded back on. I've seen cam towers JB Welded into place because the screw holes were stripped. Don't become one of those stories, "You won't believe what some guy brought into the shop today, covered with JB Weld!!!" Seriously, fix it right, fix it once.
  15. How about retaining/radiating the heat coming off the engine?