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      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

leddhedd528

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About leddhedd528

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    TT Member

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    Washington
  1. Before you go spending a gang of money on a new clutch, are you really really sure it's adjusted correctly? That's really not all that many miles for a clutch.
  2. I've gotten fork springs, shock springs, a cam, a seat and about twenty other things for my 450 EXCR from ktm-parts.com. Always got prompt, friendly service and a good price.
  3. No, it's a steel sleeve. I'm doing the same thing to mine. For the same reason :-(
  4. I ended up galling the threads on mine the first time I tried to do it on the bike. Now I pull it every time and clean the threads really well first, then lube them with WD-40. Considering how easy these shocks are to pull (and how much a replacement would cost) I would rather just remove the shock.
  5. Your cams are fine. Mine are the same way, pointed directly away from one another. Make sure your cam chain tensioner is keeping the slack out of the chain. My cam chain was stretched so badly that the tensioner couldn't take up all the slack, and the chain jumped a couple of teeth on the camp sprockets. Trail Daddy is correct, the I mark is TDC. The H-shaped mark is for checking your ignition timing. So, if your cam timing is correct, that leaves compression, spark and carburation as trouble points. 1. Pull the plug, ground it to the head, and crank the engine over. You should see a nice fat spark, especially if you turn the lights out and shut the garage door. 2. If your spark is OK, then try spraying starter fluid into the carb. Does the engine try to run? If so, probably your carb is dirty. If not, your rings may be so shot that you can't get compression, or your valves, or your head gasket. 3. Borrow, or rent (or as a last resort, buy) a compression tester. You'll probably need an adapter for your spark plug hole. Nominal compression range is 145 to 189 psi. If it's below 145, do the oil check. Squirt a few drops of oil into the cylinder and test again. If the pressure goes up after adding the oil, your piston is shot. If it stays the same, you've got either bad valve sealing, bad rings, or a bad head gasket. Good luck!
  6. Just finished the job. It is actually very straightforward. 1. Pull the valve cover, cam chain tensioner, and clutch cover. 2. Remove the clutch and primary drive gear, and the cams. 3. Remove the old cam gears and replace with new ones. Make sure they're lined up right, there are lines to show intake and exhaust position. 4. Drop the chain through the gap, put it over the cam drive gear, then over the exhaust cam, then the intake cam. 5. Turn the crank to TDC, then align the cams to their TDC positions. 6. Reassemble, start and run five minutes, then check valve clearance. (Mine didn't change). The manual tells how to do all of it, and the parts are available at the TT store
  7. The fat, crazy chicken shows no mercy?
  8. http://www.ddgraphics.co.uk/ They have box stock sticker kits for the TTR-250 and a bunch of custom ones. I have the stocks on my 250 and they look great. Pretty reasonable too, especially compared with genuine Yamaha stickers
  9. Mine was almost impossible to install when I first got the bike. turns out the tank hadn't been installed correctly at the dealer. Once the tank is on right, though, it still takes a pretty good whack at the back of the seat to get it on right.
  10. I use a Garmin GPS 60Csx and I love it. I keep it in the pocket of my riding pants where I can get at it with gloves on. I've had more than my share of unplanned dismounts, and it hasn't hurt the unit at all. It also doesn't lose the satellites when its in my pocket or my backpack. It does seem to go through batteries kind of fast ( two days or so if on all the time) but since this is my first GPS I don't know how long batteries should last.
  11. Here;s a link to a thread that talks about mods. There's a picture of the exhaust mod about halfway down. http://ktmtalk.com/index.php?showtopic=269062&hl=smog
  12. JD kit, expected I suppose, the gearing, yeah I heard their geared too high stock, but tell me more about the exhaust and why. Also once it was jetted correctly from the dealer, Did you have mess with any time after? There's a restrictor in the muffler end cap, probably to meet noise requirements. Pulling it allows more flow. The JD kit worked perfectly from jump, I didn't have to futz with it at all. When brand new, it idled too high, but turning the idle screw down took care of it. I've ridden between sea level and 5000 feet, with no jetting issues. If you do decide to get this bike, you'll probably fid the suspension harsh for tight single track. I know I did. I ended up dialing all the damping screws on the front and back to the most plush settings. The bike handles great now. I weigh about 225, so I got the heavier spring for the shock, which also helped with the handling.
  13. I've got a 2008 450 EXC-R, street-legal and plated, with 50 hours on it, all in the dirt. The valve clearances are still in spec (haven't changed at all), the plug looks practically brand new, I've changed the oil four times and the filter twice. I clean the air filter after every ride, and check the chain tension (which hasn't moved). All in all a very low maintenance bike, but it took a lot of mods right out of the dealership to run well. JD jet and needle kit, exhaust mod and gearing change at a minimum, so the actual cost will be higher than just the list price. Worth every penny though! As far as crashing, I've crashed a LOT and the only thing I've broken are the rear turn signals.
  14. 2008 KTM 450 EXCR = installed with no problems and bike much quieter. The instructions from Dirt Tricks say that the 250 twin cam engines need to be at TDC at install, but the single cam engines don't. Here's a link to the instuctins from the site: http://www.dirttricks.com/Tensioner_Instructions_rev1.pdf
  15. Hi, I've been getting a lot of noise in the top end of my 01 TTR250 for a while now. It sounds like the cam chain rattling. I just replaced the tensioner to see if that was the problem, but no change. The valves were all a little tight but in spec. The bike runs absolutely perfect, with no problem starting either hot or cold, it's just really noisy. I noticed when I installed the new tensioner that it seemed to extend a long way, as if the cam chain were stretched out. Since they're only about $20 at the TT store I was thinking of putting a new chain in, but I'd REALLY rather not have to split the cases. Is it possible to replace the cam chain on this engine without opening the cases? I looked through the entire teardown/rebuild section of the service manual, but saw no mention of cam chain installation. Any help is MUCH appreciated.