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Numskull

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About Numskull

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  1. yep, that sounds right for a 2000 wr400/426. Just remember that is with wr cams, yz cams have different timming marks.
  2. I suppose if you spend the money, tear your motor apart, to install an auto decompresser, your gonna think its the greatest thing sense the mono shock. "There is no way I spent all that money and labor with out getting the best mod ever, I even changed the oil!" "I know it started with one kick before, but it starts with one or two now, and I can do it with flip flops " You can start the manual decompresser with flip flops too. You can also move your 426 back wards about 12" after you shut down, now the piston is at tdc and ready for the one kick start with out having to strain your brain with the complicated starting ritual. As far as performance gain, that would be null unless going to hot cams with a different performance cam, but stock or OEM you ain't gonna see it.
  3. I really like the way my stock camed 426 starts. It is super easy to find TDC as the kicker comes to a dead stop, pull the decompressor and move the kicker an inch, and now the motor is in a perfect place to start. One smooth kick and it comes to life with out a flinch. I started a couple of older bikes with the auto decompressor and didnt like the feel of it. Im gonna stay with the 2001 cam. You can jump start it also by pulling the comp lever and then release the clutch followed by the comp lever. One kick, thats all it takes.
  4. I ride with a couple of guys that have xr500's, and they were always bragging about how much power they had So I took them for a spin to compare against my 426. Well after getting off my bike and hopping on the 500, I twisted the throttle and it felt like a moped The 426 really screams and Im the envy of all my riding buddies The only problem you might run into with the 426 is a weak shift fork or fifth gear going out. I havent had that problem, but after trolling these forums, that seems to be its only week spot. Theres people on here with 15,000+ miles on there 426. Its tall and heavy and will take some getting used to, but Im gonna keep mine
  5. Im thinking of hopping my 426 up this winter. Hotcams, bigbore kit with 13.5:1, and port and polish the heads.
  6. I haven't seen the 400, but have heard that pre 2001 the header was in the way of the bolts. On the 2001 and above, the header pipe isn't a factor. Like bird said, my clymer manual was really for the earlier models.
  7. standing transfers your weight to the pegs thus lowering the ceterofgravity. Sitting transfers the weight higher. Think of standing on a 12' step latter, if you stand on the bottom rung, there will be a low center of gravity. If you stand up on the very top, you have transfer your weight higher, the center of gravity is very high and your a little top heavy. So the answer to the question is yes, standing will lower the center of gravity as your weight has been transfered lower on the bike.
  8. Thanks for your reply No in my garage, but thats about the same as the field I didnt take the cartridge out, I just drained them and pumped the piston a couple times. But Im hoping its just the oil level. Ill take em apart this weekend and try the minimum oil level, I think ill go get the gauge, and put my old bushings back in also. Yes I had set them at 12 and 10 per factory settings.These forks are behaving way outside of adjustment parameters. Major sticktion, harsh compression, and no rebound damping. I skipped measuring that compression nut on top of the piston rod, maybe ill do that this time
  9. I finally got around to installing a pivot works fork kit on Sunday(my only day off). I got out there about 8:00am thinking I would get her done no later than 11:00 so I could have the rest of the day riding a finally tuned 426 At 10:30 I was thinking how easy it was to install new seals, bushings and wipers and how great of a mechanic I am. Then come the part to add the oil. I couldnt find a ruler or tape measure for measuring oil level, so I was gonna try just adding the 19 .oz I thought the manual called for and soon realized that wasnt gonna work. So I improvised by taking a piece of paper and pencil over to my receiver hitch and marking it at the 2" square hole so I could have a reference. Then I pulled one of the overflow hoses off the carb and marked it at 5" and proceed to siphon the oil out until the desired 5" mark. Well Now that I have the forks installed, they work worse than ever Maybe I should retire from the suspension business. 1) forks have major sticktion. Does it take awhile for new seals to break in? 2) Compression is very stiff/harsh 3) rebound dose not seem to have any damping, bounces up fast. My once good handling bike is now a nightmare to ride. I wish I had the money to send it to the pro. Any one have some good advise for me before I tear it apart and try again Oh ya, I used belray 5wt
  10. Oh and as far as unhooking your lights. It will have no effect on anything. It just turns into an open dc circuit that will draw no current, unless you short the hot wire over to ground. Think of it as taking your stereo out of your car, your car really could care less and will continue running
  11. Rich is correct, it should have no effect on your ignition. Coils are usually pretty resilient when it comes to burning up, they usually fail because of an internal short or ground because of insulation failure inside the coil. Two coils in two years could just be coincidental failure from manufacturing flaws. But if your concerned you can test tour ignition system with a ohm/volt meter and a repair manual. Here would be some things to check to see if they are in specification: 1)pick up coil 2) source coil 3) cdi out put voltage to TPS The pick up coil sends a voltage to the cdi unit when the flywheel turns past a specific point letting the capacitor discharge unit(cdi) to send a voltage into the coils primary windings where it will boost the voltage to around 30,000 volts coming out of the secondary (to spark plug) At least you found out why your bike isnt running, I would put the third coil on and go ride
  12. Good year, but it is alittle to fast, other than that its a great bike
  13. Now im laughing Logic and stupidity meet
  14. Why are the valves contacting the piston is the question I would be asking myself. Is it valve floating from weak springs at high rpm or did the timing chain skip? At any rate, your valves are probally bent and need replaced. A close inspection of your retainers and keepers should reveal if there is damage/wear to them. You can replace the valves and seat them in using valve grinding compund and a lapping tool(few buks), then do a leak test with solvent or gasoline. I believe you have a nickel plated cylinder(Nikasil?) and it is a very hard metal, and if not showing any signs of wear you can clean it and install your new piston and rings. Dont try and hone/glazebreak/or cross hatch it.
  15. Does any one know the differences between tires as far as Hard terrian, Meddium terrian, soft terrian? Are the tire compounds different? Is hard terrain gonna dig into hard dirt better than a soft terrian? Or is it just knob spacing for cleaning? Or is it wear? Does soft terrain tires work good on hard packed?