Alex R

Members
  • Content count

    26
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About Alex R

  • Rank
    TT Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    California
  1. How is it holding? Post up photos of your hardware. I found my friends' picture (locals would recognize him). I'm sure he wouldn't mind. As he also broke his ankle in a similar situation (though in the dirt) I'm sure it influenced his riding style. Any comments? He's fast: does a minute at Grange; And pretty proficient at MX too. Every time I looked at him ride I asked myself this question: who of us is holding the inside leg right; especially now after my injury. What do you think? another photo (#12 is also a friend): I also know this racer. His style is how I used to ride.
  2. Further back would be more comfortable for me. Now I see you point. Further back and out which also helps turning. Can't wait to get back in the saddle (probably another month).
  3. PM me where you get your weed. Must be good stuff.
  4. It's me. The only picture of myself I could find here at work (online). Comment away. And another very interesting picture.
  5. True mad skills. Let's put a different spin on the foot position. How many of you lowsided keeping the knee bent (my first picture). Did it result in any leg/foot injury?
  6. Thanks for the responses. I also suspect the second photo is a lowside in progress. I apologize for the confusion, but those re the pictures google found. Basically I wanted to ask what is safer for the rider's leg, not how to use it to recover from a slide. Heck with the bike. I'd rather crash it, but dismount safely than break something trying to save it. As you can probably imagine, my KTM didn't get a single scratch, as the leg took it all. So to clarify things my question is whether to bend the inside leg at the knee and skim the ground or keep it straight and as high as possible? My objective is to safely dismount the bike if it starts to fall. And as it happens fast, the action should be automatic. Sorta the same concept like mountain bike shoes' auto-disengaging cleats. If you start falling, your foot twists and it automatically disengages. Is it possible to find a MX/SuMo leg/foot position that'd ensure this disengaging action?
  7. I posted this on SMJ, but they're too busy apparently, so I thought I'd address wider crowd. I think this equally applies to MX as well, so any input is welcome. In short I recently had an embarrassing lowside at 20mph and broke my ankle. So while recovering from the surgery (6-screw plate and two sewed ligaments) and thinking about this expensive lesson I'm trying to analyze how it happened and how I can prevent it in the future. I come from the road racing background, but I've more or less learned to ride foot out. However I think I'm lazy as I don't lift my leg enough. I have long legs, so it takes considerable effort to keep it straight, not to mention they weigh a ton towards the end of the day. Two weeks ago I crashed and broke my ankle like I said: at a warp speed of 20mph. I was wearing full gear including Axo RC6 MX/SuMo boots. I did some online research and analysis of similar ankle injuries and I think I understand what happened. It was towards the end of the day. I was tired, but still pumped up about chasing a guy just one second faster than me. I've never struggled with T3 at Grange before (tight 180 right hairpin), but that day I constantly missed the turn-in and entered it hot, so I had to correct. Well, I said to myself "just lean the sucker more" and the next thing I know the bike instantly lowsided without any warning. It fell on me and slid for 3-4 feet with my leg trapped underneath. I've crashed my sportbikes: 600RR and R6 on fast tracks four times not to mention another 5-7 (don't remember exactly) lowsides on my mini-tard: TTR-125, but all of them were knee-down. During my sportbike crashes the bike slid away from me as the speed was higher (50-60mph), but even when my leg was underneath R6 one time, nothing happened. Frame sliders? As bizarre as it sounds I tend to think now, that slow SuMo crashes are more dangerous than high speed sportbike get-offs. At first I thought, that the peg (sharpened from constant grinding) hit my ankle and pushed the bone out. Probably not, as it'd be the big bone (tibia) which I didn't break. Besides the bike (KTM 450 SMR) is not that heavy and I was wearing MX boots. The way I see it now is I was lazy and only slightly lifted my legs keeping the knees bent. So when I started falling, the whole sole of the boot naturally came into contact with the ground and stayed there while the bike fell on my leg and pushed it to the outside. Hence the injury: the foot planted to the ground while the shim moving laterally and possibly twisting. This is the best I can describe it. Here's two pictures I found through google to illustrate it better. The first is how I typically ride and the second is how I think I should do it to prevent ankle injuries if I crash. It's basically bent leg vs. straight leg question. What do you think?
  8. Thanks. Actually I have a large parking lot nearby to teach the absolute basics. But something open is always better. I heard only good things about El Mirage. Are motard slicks gonna be OK there? That's what I have at the moment. The wife insists on buying the bike for the kid first and only then something with knobbies (KTM 250 XCFW) for me... as it'd be my fourth motorcycle, LOL.
  9. Sorry if it's been asked too many times. I did a brief search. Just post a link with the thread if it answers my questions. I'm about to get a TTR-50 for my 5y.o. daughter as she finally mastered shifting and modulating both brakes on her bicycle. Can you recommend good family-friendly places to ride on Southern California. I live in South OC. I noticed there's some activity in the desert near Grange track in Apple Valley I go to with my SuMo almost every weekend. I'd like something like that easy desert terrain, preferably close to OC. Something open and not crowded particularly with ATV morons. People suddenly have so much more balls and mad driving skills when it comes to four wheels. Another question I have if anyone rides in Death Valley. It's hot, but so peaceful and beautiful. My wife takes pictures every time we drive to Pahrump. If you're going to post a list of places, please rate them and briefly describe what to expect: dunes, jumps, ruts, slippery sand, weather conditions, dangerous animals, rude people, etc. TIA, Alex
  10. LOL, I don't even have the airbox anymore, just pod filter. Trust me, I experimented with the jetting already. Maybe it's the rev limiter, but I've never experienced rev limiter working like that.
  11. It's 150 now (BBR kit), but the problem persists. I thought at first it's some sort of rev limiter and it's perfectly normal, but my friend who put the 150 kit in said it's not. Other bikes don't do it. I have 150 BBR kit, 26mm Keihin carb, FMF pipe, and UNI pod filter. I believe we've got the jetting right: 38mm pilot, 118 main, middle (3rd) needle clip. I experimented with other settings as well. What I'm trying to say it must be electrical problem. Maybe it's the spark plug or dare I say the ECU?
  12. I put street tires on my little bike to ride it on kart tracks. The front chatters a little but nothing bad. I read about popular suspension upgrades (YZ80 forks and Works Peformance shock). Currently I have stock suspension with stiffer BBR springs. I weigh 200lbs and it works OK. Considering I ride the bike on relaively smooth asphalt surface I'm wondering if the stock suspension is good as is. I know nothing about dirtbikes, but per my understanding even cheap dirt suspension is OK to absorb minor road course pavement irregularities. So tell me about the difference it makes for TTR-125s converted to supermoto.
  13. Thanks, man. I'll go with your baseline: 118/38/middle clip I'm in Aliso Viejo, which is in Orange County, South of LA. I don't know if I menioned it in this thread, but I converted my TTR into a sportsman-class motard, so I can ride it at two local kart tracks: Adams and Grange. As I lowsided yesterday at Adams, I keep thinking I've got enough power for that tight track (slippery after dark) without a 150 kit, but not for Grange on weekends, especially its long front straight.
  14. Hi, Jeff. I hope the parts will arrive tomorrow and not on Monday, but it's not a big deal anyway. I suspected the carb kit comes with different jets. Glad you confirmed it. I'll go with dirttrakin280h baseline and then watch the spark plug color. And my "mechanic" (a friend who helps me with wrenching) will play with the carb too.
  15. I ordered a BBR 150 kit and their 26mm Keihin carb kit they call "prejetted for most big bore applications". I don't know if additional jets are included in the carb kit and I'm wondering if I need any. two other mods I have right now (and intend to keep) are: - FMF Power Core 4 full system - UNI pod filter Any thoughts on rejetting, I mean baseline settings? Anybody went exact same route and didn't need any rejetting? I'm sure it's been done before and doucmented somewhere here. I'm a relative ThumperTalk noob, so please refer me to the right threads: rejetting 26mm Keihin carb for BBR 150 kit.