skully25

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About skully25

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    Male
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    Belgium
  • Interests
    Supermoto
  1. 2011 450 SX-F supermoto before: after: 2010 250 SX-F, bought used, rebuilt from the ground up. before: after: supermoto:
  2. finished it yesterday, good way of passing wintertime http://vimeo.com/18060475
  3. race grade rain tyres, although keep in mind that running those on dry roads will make em wear down pretty fast and technically they're not street legal tyres. they are however the best option to ride on either cold or wet roads, or the 2 factors combined since the rubber compound is very soft and the tyre profile is designed to quickly disperse water.
  4. I'd say the hardest part is actually getting the wheel in there and getting the caliper back in place. I've actually been thinking about making a vid of a rear wheel installation for some time now because a lot of people seem to encounter some trouble with getitng the wheel back in. might just do that seeing as I'm gonne have to swap tyres pretty soon. mine isn't a trackbike, I still ride street most of the time. pardon me for saying but do I detect a little hostility in your post? I'm not trying to brag about my own skills or anything, just doing what I can to help out and stating my observations... you're right, clutch control won't do anything when you're accelerating. thing is, most people get a cush hub because they're affraid of what might happen during a downshift. the difference a cush hub will make during acceleration is way less then what your reply makes it appear to be. the pulsation you describe isn't even noticable and it's not like a bike with a non cush hub will accelerate in a boggy way so I wouldn't see that as a reason to pick a cush over a non cush. as far as the tyre life aspect goes, it's pretty much impossible to compare since everything is too random. it has more to do with riding style, tyre pressure and the tyre itself, total weight (things which all vary) then wether or not you have a cush hub. look, if a cush hub gives you ease of mind and you want to run one that's fine with me, I simply don't see the need for one nor have I ever felt like I needed one so I'll stick with my regular wheels.
  5. no, that's not what I was trying to say. a cush hub might be a nice feature on some road bikes (pretty general term tbh, then you can just as well compare a gixxer with nearly twice the weight and three times the power to one of our bikes. that doesn't really add up if you're analysing stress on the drivetrain.) but it's not always a requirement. the real key to avoiding stress has to do with the clutch, not the hub. a cush hub allows the sprocket to move a bit to take away a tiny bit of the load producded while you're accelerating or decellerating but that only works to some degree since the rubbers inside the hub and only flex so much. try approaching a turn, braking late and downshifting hard without feathering the clutch, meaning just let it out completely. you'll get wheel hop at the back even with a cush hub, at that point the final drive and gearbox really see some punishment. if you feather the clutch (keeping it at the point of engagement) or if you have a slipperclutch you can manipulate the connection between the gearbox + the rest of the motor and the rear wheel and final drive. the clutch will slip when it's required to slip, technically this means the clutch will disengage the motor from the rear wheel when the load of the rear wheel becomes to great for the motor to handle. a slipperclutch does this action for you, with a conventional clutch you need to keep it at the point of engagement to allow the clutch to slip when necessairy. this technique is widely adapted in supermoto use to initiate a drift but at the same time it also helps to deal with stress that's put on the motor. that's the long explination. what it boils down to is, if you're that worried about excess stress learn to work the clutch., it'll do a lot more good then a cush hub alone. my previous exc had 18000 hard supermoto miles on it with plenty or tracktime, it didn't have a cush hub (I still use the same wheels on my new bike), it didn't have a dampened clutch basket like the new exc models nor did I have slipperclutch. when I opened the bike up for the last time before I let it go the tranny and such were still in great shape. so to the people that are torn between the decision of non cush or cush, just to give you peace of mind: do you NEED one to avoid bad things from happening? no, not at all especially on the new models (remember the dampened clutch basket on the '08 exc's) that's all I'm trying to say and I do think that's what walambo was asking about.
  6. talk about overreacting, I can fit my 5" in a couple minutes and that's taking it easy, you just gotte know what you're doing... I still don't get why some people make such a big deal about cush hubs. I never ran a cush hub before nor does the majority of supermoto riders out there and I have yet to see any tranny or drivetrain releated issues that were caused by not running one. a cush hub also clouds control over the rear wheel since it doesn't provide direct feedback anymore but I guess that's not something the average street rider will make a big deal of. btw, the new exc's have a rivetted cush in the outer clutch basket so that allready helps to take some of the stress away that's being transfered from the rear wheel. if you really want to avoid excess stress : clutch control! or if you can't bring yourself to actually controlling the clutch instead of just pulling it in and letting it out you could go the slipper clutch route, that's the uber expensive route though
  7. beringer 6 pot caliper with a braking 310mm disc. expensive: a bit, complicated: not really, worth it: absofreakinglutely the brakeline was rubbing the wheel when I tried to use the '08 fork guards. stock caliper and oversized rotor doesn't work in my case. I hit the track a lot and managed to cook the stock setup on my previous bike the first time I took it out on track (warped the rotor and the brakepads only had a purpose as trash afterwards)
  8. because it's give you a lot more space so you can work on the bike more easily. seriously that rear chainguard is dead weight and the chain will start to eat it sooner or later, happends on pretty much every exc. http://web.comporium.net/~jimncheryl/bike/DSC04570.JPG http://web.comporium.net/~jimncheryl/bike/DSC04571.JPG if you want a decent chainguard to keep the chain from hitting the tyre or wheel (which technically shouldn't even happen in your case since your running a 4,25 rim) have a looksie at this: http://img256.imageshack.us/img256/5567/attachmentphppo9.jpg your tyre might clear the front guards but a little vibration and the tyre will hit them anyway. the '08 guards didn't even work in my cause because I use a different caliper, I couldn't route the brakeline because the guard took up too much space. they're also a pain in the ass to remove, you actually need to take the fork legs out in order to remove the guards... set of '07 guards made things a lot easier, more clearance so no very tight fits with the possibility of rubbing, easier to remove and remount, easier to route brake and speedo line. just trying to give you some pointers since I'm running the same bike...
  9. you really oughte think about ditching that rear chainguard and get a set of '07 guards for the front forks. couple of bucks and it'll save you a lot of headaches wheel and tyre wise, even brakeline routing works out a lot better when you use a set of '07 guards. that's what I did, loads more room at the back (even with a 5" and 160/60 tyre) and front and no rubbing on anything. @ collegeboy. pilot powers aren't a bad choice, if you can get a good deal on pirelli tyres you really ought to look into pirelli dragon supercorsa pro tyres (120/70 SC1 at the front, SC2 150/60 at the rear), pretty much on of the best street legal tyres can you buy grip wise. personally I don't know any decent dunlop street tyres, their supermoto slicks rule but you can't exactly run those on the street.
  10. they might not be made for road use but they offer way more protection then roadrace boots. honoustly, roadrace boots feels like sandals because they're way too flexibel once you're used to riding with MX boots. I had a pair of oxtars when I first started out riding sm. later I made the switch to a pair of sidi flexforce boots, one thing's for sure I'm never going back to roadrace boots. you're wrong about the soles actually, most sm boots have the same type of soles as mx boots. the only difference is some brands add slider kits or make sure that the sole itself is replaceable. not that it should matter, I've been using my flexforce boots for well over 2 years now and there's little wear on the soles because I don't drag my feet across the pavement, I keep em floating just above the ground which is the way most guys ride when riding foot out.
  11. wether or not you'll be competitive depends on the rider, not the bike imho. it'll go as fast as you make it go. the SMR's only 3 years old so it's not like it should be considered obsolete compared to the latest models.
  12. that an original ktm fender or an aftermarket one? buddy of mine has been looking all over for a full black '08 fender but he could only found one in black with an orange center.
  13. mind if I chip in new 530 exc-r black behr wheels (3,5*17 front, 5*17 rear) beringer 6-pot caliper braking 310mm rotor beringer BRO-12 master cylinder acerbis multiplo E handguards reworked suspension white plastics with custom graphics quickrelease skidplate ktm crashpads ktm catch can
  14. rear: old styled michelin pilot slick, the new slicks have a U type grooves front: michelin pilot rain http://www.motorcycletiredealer.com/download/pix/rain_f.jpg
  15. http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=542907&highlight=why+17