• Announcements

    • Bryan Bosch

      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

motoguy128

Members
  • Content count

    20
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

10 Good

About motoguy128

  • Rank
    TT Newbie

Profile Information

  • Location
    Iowa
  • Interests
    Cycling, Swimming, Running, Triathlons, Travel, Adventure
  1. I have a RC low bend on my KLX. I had to use the universal adapters because it is an oversized bar (Taperwall). This puts the bar about 1/2" higher than stock. The stock bar is actaully higher than it seems. I think the RC high bar should work OK. The controls have at least an extra 1/2" - 1" of slack, but I'd use a 7/8" bar so you cna use the stock clamps.
  2. You must be joking? There's just a little difference in the diameter of the cyclinders that will cause some problems. It's almost like asking if one head off a Dodge HEMI V8 will fit a 4 cylinder Dodge Neon.
  3. This is what confuses me. Being an engineer, I need logical explinations and it's driving me nuts that ALL streetbikes (even Ducati's) and ALL other dual sportbikes (even KTM's) don't wear out valves in less than 20,000 miles, often 60,000+ miles and nothing. Yet this is "normal" for dirtbikes to eat through valves like candy. I've heard of a CBR900RR with over 100,000 miles including some use on the ractrack that still never had a engine rebuild. They used just regular non-synthetic automotive oil in it too. The only other bikes I've heard that require this much maintenance are 125 and 250 2-stroke road race bikes. But a 250 road race machine is a V-twin that makes I believe over 90HP. The 125's I think make almost 50HP. So they are highly stressed motors. Does it have something to do with dirt and dust getting into the engine? My only other thought is that the engines are designed to be ultra compact and lightweight at the cost of durability. I'm amazed at how small the transmission is on my KLX. The 6 speed tranny on my CBR600 was at least twice the size... but it also made 3 times the torque.
  4. Mine made it over the jumps, no problem. I was too chicken sh** ti attempt any doubles, but the bike wasn't holding me back. James Stewart isn;t going ot win any race with it, and landing a tripple would rpobably bottom it out, but otherwise it seems fine. There's a guy on another KLX site that is planning on racing his and figures he can win the local amature 125 class... no suspension mods. There's photgraphic proof of him landing doubles and getting about 10 feet of air. Most local MX tracks don't have huge tripples where your 30 feet off the ground.
  5. go to the kawasaki website or search for engine specifications. If the bore and stroke are the same, then there's a good chance it's the same engine. I suspect that they are not the same, and the KLR has a longer stroke motor and wider gear spacing.
  6. The KLX will do about 85mph indicated with a neutral wind and on flat pavement. It will do about 90 after you do a few mods, add an aftermarket exhaust system and jet kit. I test rode both the DRZ400 and KLX250S. The suspension & brakes flet better on the KLX and the motor was smoother. Plus it has a 6 speed, so yu can have a stump puller 1st gear and still cruise at 70 without being at redline and great gear spacing inbetween. The strength of the KLX isn't the open road. It's the best street legal trail bike you can buy. The suspenson is more than capable enough for MX tracks, yet it's still fairly stable at higher speeds on pavement. It's compromise is that its not good for long rides, and not ideal for carring a lot of luggage.
  7. Great bike if you aren't interested in longer trips but want to go ANYWHERE that a MX or trail bike can go including MX tracks and tight woods. Its' basically a trial bike with full street legal kit. It can do 80, but crusing over 70mph for long distances is pretty tiring since there no real wind protection. I'm considering adding a bar mounted flyscreen. Hands down the best off road suspension on a street legal bike under $6000. Awesome brakes, smooth motor, adequate power stock, good power and throttle response after it's opened up with some mods and an exhaust. This bikes is the extreme end on teh off-road oriented dual sport bikes. A BMW, V-Storm or Buell, is the extreme on the street oriented dual sports. The KLR falls near the middle.
  8. Adeventure riding (mostly pavement) - Sportbike textile jacket, full faced sprotbkie helmet, gloves and mid height/casual waterproof boots. Mostly trail riding - MX pants, jersey, helmet, googles, gloves, Boots with soft knee protectors, soft elbow protectors and light weight roost protection.
  9. From the factory, they use a rivet style masterlink or the chain may be preassembled from teh OEM chain supplier. Revet links are stronger but are not reuseable. ON high HP bikes like sportbikes it usually preferred to use a rivet style link. You need a chain press tool to properly remove the rivet pins. Although a grinder should also work but you should throw away the complete outer link you remove because the grind marks on the side plates could weaken the chain at that point.
  10. Try 7/64ths.
  11. That thing needs some work to be a proper dual sort... but it's halfway there. Smaller battery, junk the nitrous (dead weight), get a proper high mount dirt bike exhaust, add skid plate, wider knobby front tire, fork & wheel with disc brake, hand guards, folding shifter, replace american flag stickers with skull and crossbones. Do all that and it's probably a entertaing pig of a bike to ride on backroads and through the desert. The frame will probably bend or snap the first time you bottom it out. This gives me an idea. You know a Yamaha FZR1000 would be a fun bike to convert into a high HP adventure machine. A Honda Superhawk would also be perfect.
  12. Any automative oil with "energy conserving" on the seal on the back of the lable should never be used with a wet clutch because it contain "moly" and other additives that will ruin the clutch plates. You can however use most 5W50, 15W50 or 20W50 oils such as Mobile 1 "red cap/label". I've used this in several of my other motorcycles. It does tend to make the bike shift a little stiff until it warms up. I'll probably start buying some Amsoil sythetic blend after the engine is broken in. For the next 1000 miles, its Honda GN4.
  13. This company http://electrosport.com/ makse some pretty cool gauges for a reasonable pirce. I think their wesite is down right now. I'm cosidering at a future upgrade because you can get a temperature gauge and possibly add an oil pressure switch. 2 good things to have IMO.
  14. Either one of your bikes could be used to pull stumps in a pinch. You have some serious HP in you stable.
  15. Welcome to the freedom of 2 wheels.