SXBernard

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About SXBernard

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    TT Newbie

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  • Location
    California
  1. Atv

    It has been four years since my Daughter's accident. In her memory I continue to try to get the message out. Below is the letter I wrote 4 years ago. Written with all the emotion of the moment - It still says what I beleive, so I don't edit it just send it out every so often hoping it will help another..... " I love dirt bikes and all aspects of the sport. I taught my whole family to ride and I clearly understand the benefits and risks associated with this type of activity. I can unconditionally state this because I recently lost my 18-year-old daughter in a desert accident. She was my treasure and I will miss her dearly forever. You need to understand I am not one to pass responsibility on to others. Off-road play is inherently dangerous and we must acknowledge this as part of our sport. My daughter, an avid dirt bike girl, was driving one of the new off road jeep type vehicles. There are several of these types of vehicles on the market; Polaris Ranger, a Yamaha Rhino, Kawasaki Mule to name a few. My daughter was driving a Rhino in her accident. I do not hold Yamaha responsible but my conscience forces me to get this message out far and wide. With their size and roll bars, these vehicles give an impression of being very safe – certainly safer then a dirt bike or quad. Her accident was on a very flat, clean part of the desert. She was fully strapped in using an improved aftermarket 4-point (verses factory 3 point) restraint seatbelt. The vehicle rolled when she turned it and she was caught between the roll bar and ground. I’m not opening this for a running debate; I just want everyone to understand that these vehicles are just as dangerous as our other off road toys. I have seen many people riding these with little or no protective gear, children in their laps, people standing in the back etc. Do not be fooled by the “perceived safety”. I encourage you to enjoy this new family of vehicles, but please treat it like a dirt bike or quad where the danger is much more self-evident. Make sure your family and friends wear protective gear! Ride with your children! Learn the vehicles capabilities. Respect these vehicles and play smart. I beg you to learn from my loss. For each person we can make safer in the future it helps me take a small step forward trying to heal. Thank you for reading this and out of respect please pass it on to any it may benefit." Sincerely, Rich Bernard
  2. It has been four years since my Daughter's accident. In her memory I continue to try to get the message out. Below is the letter I wrote 4 years ago. Written with all the emotion of the moment - It still says what I beleive, so I don't edit it just send it out every so often hoping it will help another..... " I love dirt bikes and all aspects of the sport. I taught my whole family to ride and I clearly understand the benefits and risks associated with this type of activity. I can unconditionally state this because I recently lost my 18-year-old daughter in a desert accident. She was my treasure and I will miss her dearly forever. You need to understand I am not one to pass responsibility on to others. Off-road play is inherently dangerous and we must acknowledge this as part of our sport. My daughter, an avid dirt bike girl, was driving one of the new off road jeep type vehicles. There are several of these types of vehicles on the market; Polaris Ranger, a Yamaha Rhino, Kawasaki Mule to name a few. My daughter was driving a Rhino in her accident. I do not hold Yamaha responsible but my conscience forces me to get this message out far and wide. With their size and roll bars, these vehicles give an impression of being very safe – certainly safer then a dirt bike or quad. Her accident was on a very flat, clean part of the desert. She was fully strapped in using an improved aftermarket 4-point (verses factory 3 point) restraint seatbelt. The vehicle rolled when she turned it and she was caught between the roll bar and ground. I’m not opening this for a running debate; I just want everyone to understand that these vehicles are just as dangerous as our other off road toys. I have seen many people riding these with little or no protective gear, children in their laps, people standing in the back etc. Do not be fooled by the “perceived safety”. I encourage you to enjoy this new family of vehicles, but please treat it like a dirt bike or quad where the danger is much more self-evident. Make sure your family and friends wear protective gear! Ride with your children! Learn the vehicles capabilities. Respect these vehicles and play smart. I beg you to learn from my loss. For each person we can make safer in the future it helps me take a small step forward trying to heal. Thank you for reading this and out of respect please pass it on to any it may benefit." Sincerely, Rich Bernard
  3. I love dirt bikes and all aspects of the sport. I taught my whole family to ride and I clearly understand the benefits and risks associated with this type of activity. I can unconditionally state this because I recently lost my 18-year-old daughter in a desert accident. She was my treasure and I will miss her dearly forever. You need to understand I am not one to pass responsibility on to others. Off-road play is inherently dangerous and we must acknowledge this as part of our sport. My daughter, an avid dirt bike girl, was driving one of the new off road jeep type vehicles. There are several of these types of vehicles on the market; Polaris Ranger, a Yamaha Rhino, Kawasaki Mule to name a few. My daughter was driving a Rhino in her accident. I do not hold Yamaha responsible but my conscience forces me to get this message out far and wide. With their size and roll bars, these vehicles give an impression of being very safe – certainly safer then a dirt bike or quad. Her accident was on a very flat, clean part of the desert. She was fully strapped in using an improved aftermarket 4-point (verses factory 3 point) restraint seatbelt. The vehicle rolled when she turned it and she was caught between the roll bar and ground. I’m not opening this for a running debate; I just want everyone to understand that these vehicles are just as dangerous as our other off road toys. I have seen many people riding these with little or no protective gear, children in their laps, people standing in the back etc. Do not be fooled by the “perceived safety”. I encourage you to enjoy this new family of vehicles, but please treat it like a dirt bike or quad where the danger is much more self-evident. Make sure your family and friends wear protective gear! Ride with your children! Learn the vehicles capabilities. Respect these vehicles and play smart. I beg you to learn from my loss. For each person we can make safer in the future it helps me take a small step forward trying to heal. Thank you for reading this and out of respect please pass it on to any it may benefit.
  4. The kick starter has not been moved. So that is not the cause. I'm planning on checking the exhaust valves per Dave's suggestion. Its the easiest and seems to make sense. I will check the compression as well. Do any of you know what compression value I should get - more importantly what is the low end number where I should start worrying about the top end. This has been the first thread I have used this web sight. It is really helpful. Thanks to everyone.
  5. Thanks for the info. I did do a valve adjustment just a couple of rides before the Kick starting got more difficult. I will go back in and check them again. Is there a way to know if you need top end work? The bike does not smoke nor burn oil. It has not lost any performance. I just don't want to wait too long. Typically how many hours do you get out of the 400 SX before having to be concerned?
  6. I have a 2001 400 SX. Bought it used in 2002. Do the usual maintenance - Oil - check/adjust valves But have never done anything major. I have always been able to kick start bike without using decompression lever (original owner took it off!). Just kick and it almost always starts. It has been just great. This last weekend the kick became significantly harder. The bike still starts well and runs well but I'm wondering if it is time to do the top end. Is a tougher kick a sign of trouble? To me it would imply compression is going up not down. What signs should I look for to know the Top end is needing work? The bike is getting up in hours but want to avoid the work as long as possible. Any advice would be great.