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Stickshift

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About Stickshift

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    TT Newbie

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Texas
  1. Stickshift

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC ABS 2014

    Tiger 800 XC - fun ride!
  2. Stickshift

    Triumph Tiger 800 XC ABS (2014)

    0 comments

    Tiger 800 XC - fun ride!
  3. Stickshift

    Chain slap

    My buddy and I also always adjust the chain to the tight side of the specified range. One other hot tip - expensive but oh so worth it - TM Designworks chain guides are awesome, they will take a lot of the slap out.
  4. Don't forget to check for a cracked slide - these things are famous for doing that. Will affect how the engine runs for sure...
  5. Stickshift

    Slime in tubes?

    If you are riding in lots of rocks, or areas with bad thorns, it is definitely a good idea to run Slime in tires with tubes. It's a little irritating when you check the air pressure, you get a little Slime in your air gauge, but otherwise it's great. Heavy duty tubes are also important for this kind of duty. Note there are several related threads if you do a TT search. Cheers, BG
  6. Stickshift

    WR pics with the best background landscape

    From our annual Big Bend ride in Nov...
  7. Stickshift

    Tips On Cleaning Air Box..............

    Sounds to me like you are servicing your air filter and airbox properly, maybe that's not your problem. Is there any way your bike sucked dirt and water up one of the vent lines? I read about that now and then...you might inspect all the various lines hanging down under your bike, look for telltale signs of mud etc far up the lines. Good luck with it.
  8. Stickshift

    Hand gaurds

    Guys, This is a subject I can speak to as I learned this lesson the hard way. Last October I was riding in the annual AMA dual sport ride in Terlingua, Texas (Big Bend area). It was the 5th year in a row I made this ride with my buddies, we log around 300 miles per year on this ride and I'd never even gotten a scratch out there. Pretty amazing considering how rough the terrain is - rocky, sandy, hills, lots of washouts etc. The dust is always an issue as there are lots of riders. A washout snuck up on me, didn't see it until the last second, we've been trained to always punch it and bring the front end up to hit a washout, never panic and brake into one...so I punched it, determined to pull this out and keep on going. I did not manage to get the front end up (too little time and back tire worn too much) so I spudded my front wheel into the washout, of course I did an instant endo. I was probably going about 20-25 mph, not all that fast, so I very gracefully rolled on the ground and popped up at the end. I knew my hand felt a little funny but I was all pumped up, so I ran over to pick my bike up and keep on going. As soon as I tried to pick up the bike I knew my right arm was hurt. Yow - my arm was BENT, with close to a compound fracture! When I went over the bars I must have still been hanging on to the throttle trying to pull it out, I broke both my radius and ulna (I didn't used to know the names of your two forearm bones, either). Two surgeries later, I have a titanium plate and 13 screws holding my radius back together (good as new), my ulna still gives me a little trouble but it's pretty OK, 5 months since the eat. This is a very real possibility for any dirt bike rider with bark busters. Barkbusters are essential for riding in the woods, they save your hands from getting pinched and smashed by trees, and they keep trees from compressing your front brake lever. They protect your controls - levers, throttle tube, grips - and make you feel pretty bullet proof. Woods riders rarely go over the bars, so life is good. For motorcross riding, or for desert riding, bark busters are a BAD IDEA. I used to think hand guards were worthless since they are so flimsy, I now realize this is part of what's good about them. If you go over the bars, the hand guards will move out of the way and not break your arm. They also do a good job breaking the wind (important on dual sport rides in the wind and rain), and they will deflect roost thrown at you by the guy in front of you. They are not much good in the woods, as you can get your hands smashed, etc. Hand guards do not protect your controls very well as discussed above, so you need to take that into consideration. Either run unbreakable (hinged) levers (expensive, and usually require special perches), or pack a spare pair of stock levers in the event of a crash (cheap way to go - us dual sport guys pack all kinds of tools and parts anyway). You need to get some bar end protectors to fill the holes in the end of your grips (since you normally run bark busters), and to protect the end of your throttle tube from damage in case of a spill. Voila - you're ready for the desert or track, you can re-install your trusty barkbusters when you get ready to head back to the woods. PS I just go my new hand guards via UPS as I'm prepping for a ride in the Texas hill country where there are no trees - I'm practicing what I preach! Keep on rocking, Stickshift
  9. Stickshift

    Hand gaurds

    Guys, This is a subject I can speak to as I learned this lesson the hard way. Last October I was riding in the annual AMA dual sport ride in Terlingua, Texas (Big Bend area). It was the 5th year in a row I made this ride with my buddies, we log around 300 miles per year on this ride and I'd never even gotten a scratch out there. Pretty amazing considering how rough the terrain is - rocky, sandy, hills, lots of washouts etc. The dust is always an issue as there are lots of riders. A washout snuck up on me, didn't see it until the last second, we've been trained to always punch it and bring the front end up to hit a washout, never panic and brake into one...so I punched it, determined to pull this out and keep on going. I did not manage to get the front end up (too little time and back tire worn too much) so I spudded my front wheel into the washout, of course I did an instant endo. I was probably going about 20-25 mph, not all that fast, so I very gracefully rolled on the ground and popped up at the end. I knew my hand felt a little funny but I was all pumped up, so I ran over to pick my bike up and keep on going. As soon as I tried to pick up the bike I knew my right arm was hurt. Yow - my arm was BENT, with close to a compound fracture! When I went over the bars I must have still been hanging on to the throttle trying to pull it out, I broke both my radius and ulna (I didn't used to know the names of your two forearm bones, either). Two surgeries later, I have a titanium plate and 13 screws holding my radius back together (good as new), my ulna still gives me a little trouble but it's pretty OK, 5 months since the eat. This is a very real possibility for any dirt bike rider with bark busters. Barkbusters are essential for riding in the woods, they save your hands from getting pinched and smashed by trees, and they keep trees from compressing your front brake lever. They protect your controls - levers, throttle tube, grips - and make you feel pretty bullet proof. Woods riders rarely go over the bars, so life is good. For motorcross riding, or for desert riding, bark busters are a BAD IDEA. I used to think hand guards were worthless since they are so flimsy, I now realize this is part of what's good about them. If you go over the bars, the hand guards will move out of the way and not break your arm. They also do a good job breaking the wind (important on dual sport rides in the wind and rain), and they will deflect roost thrown at you by the guy in front of you. They are not much good in the woods, as you can get your hands smashed, etc. Hand guards do not protect your controls very well as discussed above, so you need to take that into consideration. Either run unbreakable (hinged) levers (expensive, and usually require special perches), or pack a spare pair of stock levers in the event of a crash (cheap way to go - us dual sport guys pack all kinds of tools and parts anyway). You need to get some bar end protectors to fill the holes in the end of your grips (since you normally run bark busters), and to protect the end of your throttle tube from damage in case of a spill. Voila - you're ready for the desert or track, you can re-install your trusty barkbusters when you get ready to head back to the woods. PS I just go my new hand guards via UPS as I'm prepping for a ride in the Texas hill country where there are no trees - I'm practicing what I preach! Keep on rocking, Stickshift
  10. Stickshift

    07 chain lenght ?

    Yes, you should be able to, no problem. Stock gearing is 14/50, I have run 15/50, you want to run 14/52, that's only one tooth more.
  11. Stickshift

    front wheel gear unit removal replacement?

    I did the same - the Flatland replacement spacer is sano, looks great!
  12. Stickshift

    Clutch Perch Adjuster

    The wire coming out of your clutch perch goes to the ignition wires behind the headlight - it is a safety cutout switch for the starter circuit. If you're not in neutral, the clutch has to be pulled in for the starter motor to engage. Try it and you'll see.
  13. Stickshift

    WR electric starter?

    Sounds to me like you ripped the wires from the left hand side of your handlebars - your kill button stopped working, and your clutch circuit is out. The stock clutch perch has a small switch built into it to keep you from starting the bike in gear with the clutch engaged. If this switch gets damaged or the wires get yanked out, then you have to be in neutral to start the bike. You can trace the wires from the clutch perch to one of the 4 plugs behind your number plate, on my 05 it's the far left plug. Good luck, Stickshift
  14. Stickshift

    WR450 License plate bracket

    I bought my 2005 WR450 used, it came with this (formerly unidentified) white license plate bracket on it (now I know where it came from!). It really is a well built item, bolts up to the bottom of the stock taillight assembly. Note that you bolt your plate to a piece of rubber, which bolts to the license plate bracket. Toss the rubber piece, it didn't even survive the first day of a dual sports ride in Terlingua last November. (Fortunately I was keeping an eye on it so I wouldn't lose my plate out there!) I fabricated a simple bracket to replace the rubber one, I'm good to go! This guy on eBay has a pretty unique bracket posted for the 07 WR450, too, check it out you lucky 07 owners. Cheers, Stickshift
  15. Stickshift

    simple question

    The WR450F Shop Manual states "Install the (front wheel) oil seal with its manufacturer's marks or numbers facing outward." I believe that means with the springs to the inside, to energize the seal. Cheers, BG
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