dpaglass

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About dpaglass

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  1. Nice diagram. I am curious about one thing. With the system converted to DC (via the rectifier) do the batteries have to carry a charge in order to get a spark, or does kicking the bike over create enough juice for that regardless of the state of charge on the batteries?
  2. No funky wiring, although working with 12vac is a bit different from your more common 12vdc. The stock taillight will not accomodate a dual filament bulb, so you have to either modify the socket, get a new socket and put it in the stock housing, or just get an aftermarket brake/tail assembly (that's what the po put on my '95 XR250R). One thing you should be aware of if you are going to ride on the street much is that the electrical output on the alternator is very low, barely enough to run the bike & headlight. As a result when you hit the brake light it is a barely noticable increase in wattage over just the taillight, and motorists behind you may not even realize you're on the brakes. I put in a switch to deactivate the taillight when I'm on the street, which makes it much more noticable difference in brightness when I hit the brake light. Of course this only works during daylight street operation. As far as the headlight, the po on mine put on a UFO headlight/turn signal combo unit. It doesn't really have a high beam. If you are undertaking the rewiring yourself I suggest you save yourself some effort and get a dual sport handlebar switchgear assembly (I got mine at www.procycle.us, but you can also get from Baja Designs), which will have all the wiring pigtails you need (and some you don't). In any case, unless you have the alternator rewound to generate more wattage a high beam will be pretty much useless anyway.
  3. www.procycle.us
  4. Where to you connect the external power? What regulator is being used (stock or aftermarket)? I connected the 12v power into the harness where the turn signals are connected. The regulator is stock. There is a pretty simple explanation really. You arent measuring the source voltage, but rather the voltage drop across the bulb. Take the bulb out then measure again. I spent a couple of hours on the web trying to understand the electrical systme. I think I made a fundamental problem in that I was measuring DC voltage. It appears that the XR250 produces alternating current at 12v. That probably explains why I was getting unexpected resulting everywhere when i was trying to test connections and grounds. "There is a wiring fault somewhere. Probably a bad connection. What happens if you short the leads going to the pressure switch?" You were right - I did find a problem in the flasher unit - when I replaced it with the one from my car the signals lights came on when they were supposed to, but they are not flashing - only illuminating when I hit the right or left turn switch. I wonder if the system isn't producing sufficient amperage to trigger the flashing unit - is that possibly the case? Do I need a lighter duty (for lack of a better term) flasher? "BD should have their kit install manuals on their site, which have a schematic in them." Thanks - excellent tip - I found them. I started to download, but this dang dial-up is just too slow. I'll download them at work tomorrow where I have broadband.
  5. I think I am going insane. I bought a '95 XR250R with a home-made wiring kit to convert to dual sport (brake light, turn signals, horn, etc.) I got no schematic for either the stock bike (which I have ordered) or the conversion to run the lighting done by a previous owner. My initial problem was that the brake light and turn signals didn't work (although the taillight works). But I've gotten myself totally confused now. I have done basic electric work on 12v m/c systems w/battery (installing additional lights, power outlets, etc). But this XR250 seems totally different. For example, when I supply external 12v power to the system, everything seems to work fine. But running off bike power, only the headlight, taillight and horn work. The signals are dead, even though everything seems to power off the same source. What has me perplexed most of all is that with the bike running, when I put a multi-tester on what I know is a power source to the tail light (blue wire) and a good common ground (shared by the taillight and rear turn signals), I only show a fraction of a volt, yet there is a 12v bulb in the taillight shining bright. I find the same thing happening on the headlight. When I put the probe on the blue wire coming out of the wiring loom by the steering head (which I believe is carrying the 12v to the light) and a ground, I only show a fraction of a volt with the engine running, even though the light is on at full brightness - what the heck is going on? Is there something unique or different about batteryless systems that makes normal voltage testing not work? My other major confusion is on the brake/tail light. The bulb is tested good, it has three leads going into the housing - ground, 12v to tail and 12v to brake. The taillight is powered directly off the blue wire coming out of the factory wiring loom, and the brake light also runs off the blue wire but first passes through a pressure switch on the rear brake (which I have tested and the switch works) and then goes out to the brake light. Yet what I am finding is that with the bike running the tail light comes on bright, but when I hit the brake either nothing happens or the taillight actually dims a bit instead of getting brighter. I removed the bulb from the socket and verified that I have it wired to the correct terminals on the socket (i.e. the tail light is fainter than the brake light when I directly applied a 12v source to the bulb - not powered from the bike). The wiring seems so basic, yet nothing works as I expect it to. What am I missing here??? Does anyone have a wiring scheme from a Baja Designs kit that I might be able to get a copy of for comparison? Thanks Andy
  6. Hi all - I'm new here. I am going to look at an '84 XL350R tomorrow. This will be my first dirt bike (well, dual sport). I know newer is better, but this is in my price range. I'd be interested to know if this model has any known issues I should look at when I go to look it over. According to the owner it has not seen much action, and only has about 5,000 miles on it. In the pictures it looks good, and I did at least confirm the tank is rust-free and there are no outwardly obvious problems based on the photos. My planned usage is only for fire roads and easy trails - sand, ruts, rocks etc will be avoided at all cost! (at least until I learn to ride in dirt and learn to forget what I've learned from 25 years on street bikes). Any input is appreciated. Andy