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elcubeo

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About elcubeo

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    TT Member

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    elcubeo

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  • Location
    Ohio
  • Interests
    "The circle" finding new creative ways to crash things, and far more creative ways of fixing them.
  1. I run a big bore stroker WR450 in SM trim on the street. It's difficult to find race fuel when we stray farther from home. A station 15 miles from me sells Cam2 110 octane for 8.49/gal and I hoard it. When I have to use pump fuel, I make sure to find a 3 hose pump with a dedicated hose for premium. Then I can be sure that I'm not getting a hose full of a few gallons of the last guy's 87. Prior to riding on the street, I never thought of this problem with the button select/blender pumps. Otherwise you have to try to attempt to explain fuel properties to very confused motorist, and why you are giving him 3 free gallons of fuel, Lol. Another thing I carry in my bag is this stuff called StarTron. It's an enzyme that attacks and breaks down Alcohol in the fuel. Maybe it's just blue koolaid, but it's cheap and it actually does seem to help. If you must buy pump swill....
  2. Too loose is better than too tight. Besides, the clearances just tighten up as the valves heat or stretch anyway. .0065 inch intake is just fine. My WR508 motard is getting a bit slow to start, I think its time to take my own advice soon. All those rev-limiter bonsai runs must be adding up lol.....
  3. That's impressive. Never ever heard of that happening!! I wonder if the cover was just defective, or if the chain was somehow slapping it and fatigued something. Now I am going to play with every valve cover I take off, just to see if I can get one of those wear blocks to break off......
  4. That's really cool he didn't sleeve it, I think Vertex makes A,B,C, and D pistons (increasing in size in .01mm increments to accommodate variance in bore size) for your motor. As a rule, you can put 15+ piston changes through one Nikasil bore. If changed on frequent enough intervals, that is. The original Asso Werke pistons are pretty good too. Wossner makes good forged pistons, but for wear life I feel a cast is best. Who did you order your stuff from, and what did you get?
  5. As far as break in goes, let the engine come up to temp before it gets loaded. Remember an iron sleeve expands much less than the plated aluminum cylinder that was correct and original to the engine. Lightly rev the engine to just off-idle repeatedly to warm it up. Once the radiator is too hot to touch, BEAT THE SNOT OUT OF IT. Use intermittent (2 second Max) bursts of heavy load acceleration and deceleration. This forces the piston rings to seat properly and hone themselves to seal against the cylinder wall. Picture a good pair of scissors. If the blades are sharp, but don't match each other, it doesn't serve much of a purpose. Do this break-in ride for about 20-25 min of run time, and she should be ready to race. Most importantly, LET US KNOW HOW IT RUNS!! Have fun! :-)
  6. This may be common knowledge, but something to keep an eye on... any motor with large exhaust ports like a TM can be tricky to get the rings aligned on the piston. When you are dropping the cylinder down, make sure the rings are centered on the alignment dowels on the piston, and the cylinder is clocked correctly with respect to its studs. You can ensure the rings are centered by rotating the cylinder side to side and feeling the "bump" of the ring ends contacting the alignment dowel. Take note of these points of increased friction and center this space between them as the cylinder comes to rest on its studs.
  7. I have 2 older TM's. My wife rides a 1999 125en and I have a 2001 300en. These bikes stop and handle like nothing else I've ever ridden ( in a good way). If you are looking for something unique and awesome go for it. They are one of the best designed 2-strokes I have ever taken a wrench to. Parts are valuable of course because there isn't a TM dealer on every corner. If you are looking for something to abuse regularly, maybe a Jap ride would be better because they are cheap and "Chevy" common. TM and GasGas are sick rides but maybe better treated as a Lambo or Ferrarri. I race my Suzuki and Yamaha for the same reason, the parts feel more disposable and less holy. I thought Barker Bros. was a pretty reliable importer from up in BC. We just got a newer dealer down here in the states, look up Michael Soudas of Cycle Playground in eastern PA. He knows his stuff and stocks lots of parts. Tm of UK ships daily for cheap too. Oldest Tm dealer in the world. Its up to you, any bike can be built into a winner. Anything can be your weapon. Don't let brand loyalists push you around, go with what works for you. I say buy one to keep, because buying a dirt bike to save money or build resale value is always a horrible business proposition!!!! Be safe, ride on, have a great day!
  8. 2smokin- check your valve lash lately? I know, I know, not fun. Think about it though, tough to start, gets worse once she's hot (and the valves are expanded and longer). I'm willing to bet they are a little on the tight side. I have an 06, have beaten its brains out and never experienced any electrical issues other than a voltage reg blowing out. It still ran just popped headlight bulbs.
  9. Sounds like a pretty good score. The GM OBD II ECM's are the most embraced control platform out there as far as tuning goes. I assume you have seen all of the child-proof cookie cutter tuners out there like the Hypertech Max Energy. Most guys are happy with popping in a tune and enjoying a little more response and efficiency. You may, however, want to look into HP Tuners http://www.hptuners.com/ pro level software suite. It allows unlimited adjustments and changes to timing and fuel maps, along with allowing adjustment any other parameter the ECM monitors and controls. Want to adjust a few things? Do it. Want your own GM answer to Ford's ECOBoost idea? No problem. Turbo it. This software allows your stock computer, harness, and sensors to control any combination from stock, mild cam swaps, to full race. Fun example: My friend at work uses HPTuners on his 2000 Trans Am to get over 500 hp to the rear wheels, and 31 mpg with 4.10 gears (6-speeds are cheating)! Gnarly huge camshaft, CNC ported TFS heads, huge intake manifold with a throttle body large enough to birth a child.....and it idles like Grandma's Sunday morning ride. Inspect the rear axle. Count your cover bolts. GM put 8.625" 10-bolts into almost every 1/2 ton creature they built. Beware of these. Your fleet package may actually have the 9.5" 14-bolt, but I doubt it with the small engine. In the trucks with 5.3's and the earlier 5.7's they have quite a few failures up here in plow-truck country. The achilles heel of these units is the Gov-Lock limited slip differential. They tend to explode to bits when floored on uneven traction surfaces. If you don't drive it like a cowboy, you'll be okay. If it grenades, trust me, the world won't miss it. There's your chance to wedge in a steeper screw (a 4.10:1 would be cool with the overdrive trans) and a Detroit TrueTrac diff. Sounds like a cool combo, keep us up on the project!
  10. Honestly I would just switch to a 50/50 blend of 3.5w shock fluid and 5w fork oil in your forks, this smooths out the light stuff, and as long as it's kept fresh, you see no loss in durability. Keep the level high to help soak big hits. It's way easier than changing shims. Try it first and you will be impressed. On the shock, you could swap a shim off of the compression, but I would again play with a really light oil like "redline likewater" first before you run the risk of goofing something up on the shim stacks and getting out of range. Backing out your hi speed bypass does wonders with thin oil!
  11. Good call! I also noticed that. The TM has a very short swingarm, I am willing to bet much shorter than the KTM. Geometry may be working against the KTM in this department. The shorter rear end "drives under" the bike and rider more easily, planting the rear end harder into the ground.
  12. First of all, I'm glad to hear that more people are finding out what it's like to get trampled by an Italian Stallion! I think its the cool blue plastics, the frequency of light that they reflect pushes the bike faster thru time and space. Seriously it's just cylinder port mapping. The TM has a very broad ranging motion on its power valve. When the valve is shut, off idle, she is as smooth as silk. When the valve is wide open, the TM is just a more radical motor, and sometimes that wins over displacement. My wife has a TM125en. I steal it on a regular basis, especially when it's greasy out. It's smooth down low, and RIPS up top. I can offer another explanation in car terms. If you were to race your stock 2001 ram-air Trans Am against a 1993 Mustang with a set of huge aftermarket cylinder heads and a race cam, and high compression pistons, you would get your plow cleaned. Even though your engine is 346 cubic inches and well tuned, versus his smaller 302 cubic inches.....his engine operates at a higher efficiency level at high rpm/full throttle. Want to change this? Look into a different expansion chamber and experiment with different squish heights. Look for a pipe with a sharper cone at the end of the expansion chamber. DEP makes some cool stuff. I also found that simply by adding an extra gasket under my cylinder, I was able to change the port timing just enough to give the bike a touch more top end power. Go too far though, and you may sacrifice bottom end / off-the-pipe power. You could also try widening the ports SLIGHTLY, like by 0.25mm and you will achieve more of a SX style torque hit. Raising the roof a bit will give you more RPM potential. If you raise the roof of the ports, do it very sparingly; you can't put the metal back once you grind it away. Again, work in 0.25mm increments there. At 10k rpm, an alteration the thickness of a piece of newspaper is noticeable.
  13. you just earned yourself a subscriber!! good stuff!
  14. Send me your 450 shock and I can make it do whatever you want, seriously! I don't see why you would need to swap shocks unless yours is damaged beyond repair. The spring on the 250 is probably a lighter rate, which may work better for your weight... any suspension guy can make this stuff happen pretty easily. Valving can be altered as well if there are any other seriously outstanding issues. I have brought some stuff back from the dead with a few little touches.
  15. I got bored and unlaced my spare wheels. I am going to make a 420mm front / 17" rear supermoto wheel set out of them. My plan for my '06 WR 508 is to retire it to an easy life on the street with a few scattered dual-sport bashings for good measure. I'm already geared up to lace and true a bunch of rims so if any of you guys need some rim work, i'll hook you up big time!