jungle biker

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About jungle biker

  • Rank
    TT Newbie

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Papua New Guinea
  • Interests
    riding and wrenching
  1. I've got the big Ricky Stator stators in my '85 XR600 and also in my '89 NX650. In both cases I used a 3 phase regulator rectifier out of a street bike and plugged the 2 lighting coils from the RS stator into them as if the coils were 2 seperate phases. The third phase input into the reg/rect I just leave unplugged. On the XR, I run a 100W halogen headlight with absolutely no flickering, even at idle, and there is plenty of power for signal lights and horn. I am pretty sure I could run a 130W headlight with no problems. In theory there should be 180W available, IIRC. I wouldn't run a headlight smaller than 100W, the bigger the headlight (within bounds of reason) the cooler your reg/rect stays. Downstream of the reg/rect, I use a good sized capacitor in place of a battery on the XR (which has been street legalised with turn indicators and a horn) and I use a 12V 9Ah computer UPS battery in the NX (I only use these because where I live these are easy to get and way cheaper than any motorcycle battery, which would have to be imported from the US or Australia). The charging and lighting systems end up being combined in this system, but on the NX I've also installed a kick starter, so even if the charging system failed for some reason, the ignition system is completely seperated from the rest of the electrical system and the engine will still run, no matter what the battery and lights are doing (that's why I switched to an XR ignition system inthe first place--I and a couple of my friends have all had bad experiences with the battery supported XR650L ignition systems). The ignition systems on both my XR628 and my NX675 are set up like XR600's, using XR600R CDI boxes and pulser coils. I don't use a key switch on the XR, haven't finished building the NX yet, so haven't decided what I am going to do on that one, though I do plan to at least use the steering lock and the charging circuit connect/disconnect part of the switch, if nothing else. The XR uses an original style push button kill switch. The XR has been amazingly reliable--it's a daily rider and I never have to think about the electrical system, it just works all the time. I believe that the NX will be the same whenever I finish it.
  2. I'm working on a 2000 Kawasaki Prairie 300 4x4 and I need to find a wiring diagram for it. Can anybody tell me where I can find one without having to buy a manual to get it? Thanks.
  3. Yes, it is definitely possible for valves to be that far off. They can even be worse. I still think in thousandths of an inch, so I set most of mine at .004"-.006". I have opened up engines that had no valve clearance left at all. It happens. The "F" stands for "Fire" and is where the spark plug is supposed to spark. If I remember correctly, (I used to have a '79 KLX250), your bike has electronic ignition, so you can pretty much ignore the "F" mark since you can't practically adjust your ignition timing anyway.
  4. I had a couple of 200cc Zongshen pushrod engines laying around my shop, (they came to us as part of a dealer buyout), and so I finally put one into a 1975 Honda XL125 frame just to see how it would do. I've got to say I've been impressed with the amount of abuse it will put up with. The engine had 4,000 abusive km on it before I put it into the Honda frame--I was surprised at how much the 6 spring clutch slips in spite of plenty of cable slack, (seems to have suddenly stopped slipping recently however). The starter clutch makes a lot of noise, but has never failed to work. Out of curiosity I put a chinese aftermarket XR250 CDI unit on it and it seems like I gained a little bit of power at low RPM's. I'm also running 15/43 gearing, (520 chain and sprockets) which is a bit tall, but the bike seems to have no trouble pulling me up hills and I'm not a little guy. It certainly is better than I expected from a chinese bike. Oh, I should probably also mention that I made up my own 1 3/4 inch/44mm exhaust pipe with a Supertrapp silencer on it salvaged from an XL600. I went ahead and installed the electric start and all it's related wiring and switching--had to ditch the original airbox to find room for the battery and am running a pod filter on the back of the carb. One thing I hate is the stupid "international" circular shift pattern: N-1-2-3-4-5-N-1-2-3-4-5-N-etc. I'm building up another Zonger with a Honda tranny, (that took some work), we'll see what that will be like when I have time to drop it into a frame.
  5. The photos are pretty crappy but it looks like a mid-to-late '90's Husaberg. From what I hear, they are pretty fast until they suddenly break. That's why I didn't bother to fix the engine in my FE400, which was bad when I got it. I just shoehorned a BMW F650 engine into it--not done yet...
  6. Hey, I'm building my own bike out of a 1999 Husaberg FE400 chassis and a mid '90's BMW F650 engine. Has anybody else done this? I have found a few references on the internet to an F650 powered KTM and an F650 powered Husqvarna, but that's pretty much it. It's basically the same engine as the Can-Am/Bombardier DS650 quad: I'm pretty happy with how it is going so far. Am I the only one on ThumperTalk who does stuff like this?
  7. Just to finish up this thread, (a year later, yes I know, but I still get PM's about this one sometimes), the problem ended up being the ignition coil--I am used to Honda XR's which are only supposed to have around 1 ohm of ignition coil primary resistance, which is what the TT-R coil had when I checked it. I found out later that it is supposed to have 4 ohms of primary resistance, (13K ohms secondary resitance). Once I replaced the coil, it started right up and has been running just fine ever since. Jungle Biker
  8. I agree with the camchain tensioner diagnosis. I would replace the chain and both guides. My guess is that the tensioner spring should still be fine, I have never seen one worn out, but the guides do wear out and do get noisy.
  9. Er, perhaps I should have been more clear--yes, I did try a new plug, (it was the first thing I tried), and yes, I did check ALL the switches, including but not limited to: clutch safety switch, ignition switch, kill switch, sidestand switch, etc., and they all seem to be okay. Can anybody tell me what the problem areas are on these? This is the first TT-R 600 I have worked on, and unfortunately there are no other bike mechanics in Papua New Guinea that I know of, (it's a small country), and my attempts to get advice from dealers in Australia have been ignored. I would really appreciate a little help from somebody who is really familiar with these. Are there fuses on a TT-R 600? I don't remember seeing them....
  10. Hey! I'm working on a Aussie-spec TT-R 600, (2004 model), which has suddenly and mysteriously lost its spark. I've checked all the switches, (even removed the sidestand switch), checked the ignition coil, the stator, and the pick-up coil, but everything seems to check out. I finally decided through process of elimination that it must be the CDI box--got a new one, (had to get it from Japan), for $550 (OUCH!), and was dismayed to find when I plugged it in that there still wasn't any spark. I went back and checked everything again and as far as I can tell, there is nothing wrong. I've been wrenching on bikes for 20 years, so I am not exactly a novice, but this one has me puzzled. I live and work in a very remote area in the country of Papua New Guinea, so it's real hard for me to get manuals and advice from "my friendly local dealer", (about 700 miles away). Can anybody out there tell me what kind of resistance numbers I should be looking for from the stator and the pulser coil? Thanks.