dolphin2

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About dolphin2

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    TT Newbie

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    Arizona
  1. Yamaha

    I just jetted/pipe/K&N filter/removed airbox lid and my YFZ450 flies. They said it would open it up about 30% and I think they are correct. I also "retarded the exhaust cam." The service guys said this gives about 4 more HP and is a simple mod. I didn't want to spend a fortune on a pipe (dunes - I am not a racer) so I got the White Brothers E3 slip-on for $300. The factory head pipe is large diameter and the slip on fits 3/4 the way to the engine so it is almost a complete system. The best part is I don't have to ride the throttle on start for 5 minutes to keep it running. It almost starts on the first attempt. The factory pipe was suffocating the engine.
  2. Yamaha

    My 06 YFZ450 needed to warm up for five minutes while feathering the throttle. I had to re-start it 4-5 times to get it warmed up. We went night riding in the dunes and I had trouble idling because of the cold. I just installed an aftermarket slip on pipe and a K&N airfilter (removed airbox lid). Of course they re-jetted but now the thing can BREATHE! Major power improvement and best yet it starts cold on the first try and runs without touching the throttle. The manufacturer settings/pipe are choking the engine... let that baby free!
  3. Yamaha

    I am less than a year into the sport and I would suggest renting to try a few bikes. After that go with the one you are most comfortable with. I have a Yamaha 2006 YFZ450 and I chose it because of it's low stance and power to weight ratio. The YFZ 450 is considered a racing bike, but I am no racer, I just like it. It is awesome on the dunes, wheelies and jumps. I ride with a Yamaha 2004 Raptor 660, Polaris Predator and Suzuki Quadsport (older version). The Raptor is just as great but is more of a trail bike with a higher stance. I didn't care for the design of the predator. I would also consider the Honda 450 and the Suzuki quadracer. Those are all great bikes so I would choose whichever you are more comfortable with. I was very close to choosing the Honda 450. The Raptor and Suzuki models are now fuel injected which is great if you are going to places with large changes in elevation above sea level but newer and more complicated engines aren't always the least expensive. I had trouble keeping my YFZ450 starting and running until I put a pipe and K&N air filter on it. Now it starts and runs without warm up.
  4. I am looking for a good pipe solution for the '06 YFZ450. I seek a reasonable pipe for non-racing but good performance and I was worried about removing the stock header pipe because it runs hot. Therefore for a middle priced, reasonable performing pipe, what is the best approach? I was considering the DMC Afterburner Quiet but was wondering if a slip-on model was good enough since I am not a racing nut. I am not avoiding a re-jet just trying to find a solution under $500.
  5. Yamaha

    I have been on 3 trips to Glamis and Gordon's well on my new '06 YFZ450. I am sporting Sand Star tires, only on the rear with stock on the front. I would recommend this setup for your trips. They are size AT20x11-10R. I don't notice any lack of grip as wheelies and hill climbs are no problem. We had nine in our group on various bikes some with Gecko tires and others with Sand Stars. There is considerably more sand thrown into the air with the Sand Stars causing numerous riders to pick a different line when behind. The Sand Star has 8 paddles with 8 smaller scoups in between. The key to paddles is to keep the pressure just a bit low so the tire can adjust to the sand, around 4-5 lbs. One rider was having trouble climbing hills and with reduced pressure he was a lot more successful. I would advise you to have a few extra nuts on hand (for the rear tires) because it is easy to strip the stock nuts.