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3BeeJay3

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About 3BeeJay3

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    TT Bronze Member

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  • Location
    Ontario
  1. 3BeeJay3

    06 TE250 odo at 5,000 miles

    How many hours are on the OP's bike? Or, how many hour did it take to get to 5000 miles?
  2. 3BeeJay3

    2007 te250

    Mine's been a great bike. Over 300 hours of nasty riding, still runs like new. Did my first intake adjustment at ~240-250 hours. Bypass the clutch safety switch to avoid problems from that, do the recommended mods(if they haven't already been done), and you're good to go.
  3. 3BeeJay3

    TE 250 dual sport maintenance?

    As the owner of both a TE250 and DRZ400, I'd have to disagree with that statement. A TE 250 makes about the same overall power as a DRZ400 S and is more than capable of pulling 90+ mph with the right gearing. The new Yammy WR250 dual sports will easily pull 85 mph in stock form The only problem with a TE 250 for true dual sport use is the close ratio tranny and full dirt attitude. The TE 250 does 2 things well; it works great as a dirt bike and great as a city bike, where speeds are less than 40 mph. If your idea of dual sporting is ripping around town and hitting the trails, the TE is perfect. For highway use, not so good.
  4. 3BeeJay3

    Tried this out tonite

    The base unit is(I believe) about ~$400 CAD or so (~380 US), but with the new mods works a lot better & faster than the Nomar version. It's also designed to be portable for racers etc., so they can take it to the track etc. There should be a new video posted soon, that was taken yesterday showing how it works with the new mods. The guy who designed it is a pretty clever fella and has designed and built a lot of cool stuff for motorcycles. The base unit mounts into a 2" trailer hitch receiver. You can buy an optional pedestal base to mount on your shop floor etc. Not sure exactly what the pedestal base costs, but I expect it would be about $100-150 or so. BJ
  5. 3BeeJay3

    Tried this out tonite

    There are a few different styles of tire changing machines out there, but this one is one of the best, if not the best. It's safe on all rims and is incredibly quick. A skilled operator can dismount and remount a tubeless tire in under 45 seconds. Tubed tires take a bit longer. I tried it out tonite at a friends, having never used it before and popped one side of a tire off the rim and re-installed it in about 30 seconds. Scratch-free tire changer: There are some youtube videos of it in action, in the link on our club site; http://www.odsc.on.ca/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=15139 There is an updated video that should be available in the next couple days, showing the new mods to the machine that mostly eliminate the need for tire spoons. BJ
  6. There are a few different styles of tire changing machines out there, but this one is one of the best, if not the best. It's safe on all rims and is incredibly quick. A skilled operator can dismount and remount a tubeless tire in under 45 seconds. Tubed tires take a bit longer. I tried it out tonite at a friends, having never used it before and popped one side of a tire off the rim and re-installed it in about 30 seconds. Scratch-free tire changer: There are some youtube videos of it in action, in the link on our club site; http://www.odsc.on.ca/phpBB3/viewtopic.php?f=23&t=15139 There is an updated video that should be available in the next couple days, showing the new mods to the machine that mostly eliminate the need for tire spoons. BJ
  7. Time to post another update on this. This mod to both the lower shock pivot and the swingarm pivot has worked flawlessly. I've put on over 2000km of nasty wet riding this season. The time I spent doing the mods has been paid back several times now in reduced maintenance time and reduced expense. I grease all 5 points after every few 'dry' rides or after every ride that involves water crossings or significant mud/water puddles. Often a couple drops of water squeeze out when I add grease - that's saying something! My 07 TE250 has been pretty bullet-proof, this mod just enhances an already solid bike. BJ
  8. 3BeeJay3

    Ganaraska Forest Q's?

    You can't ride any bikes inside the campground area. Only in and out the main driveway at slow speeds. You are then req'd to take the road to either Porter Rd or Boundary rd., so street plating/ins., or trailering is a must.
  9. 3BeeJay3

    How many miles are too much for a TE250?

    I have 6500+ km ( over 4000 miles) on mine, still running strong. Many out there with between 5 and 10,000 miles. These 250cc engines are pretty durable.
  10. 3BeeJay3

    2010 DR-z400 ??

    Any of the Euro bikes I listed are pretty reliable. However, not really suitable for XC trips. Most would need a better seat for the comfort factor, but so does the DRZ anyway. Most people that are interested in cross-country type trips don't bother with a DRZ, but tend towards bigger bikes like KLR's(based on what I've witnessed on the ADV rider site) BJ
  11. 3BeeJay3

    I've said it once, and I'll say it again...

    Like many other things, 'woods' is a subjective term. Bring that bike to some serious tight(ie. handlebar bashing, & weaving) , gnarly, technical woods and it will still be fun, but much more fun if it's a 125 or a 250F.
  12. 3BeeJay3

    2010 DR-z400 ??

    Part of the reason DRZ's aren't bigger sellers than they currently are, is that Suzuki hasn't had the courage to actually build the bike customers have been asking for for 10 years. In the last 10 years Suzuki has mastered the art of pawning off bikes that are really just contraptions cobbled together from the parts bin. The DRZ is a perfect example; Take a (somewhat hastily)modified DR 350 frame, add a 400 cc quad motor, off the shelf suspension, brakes etc. I've owned a DRZ400 for a few years now and it does OK as long as I don't ask too much from it(get's mostly street & light dirt use now). I bought a Husky and when I compare the 2, it's easy to see that a lot of actual thought went into the Husky design. The Suzuki is clearly a package of afterthoughts and 2nd guesses. Granted it is a good versatile bike for a person getting into the sport or a light duty trail rider. The new RMX450z is just another example of a cobbled together bike that will actually miss the mark by a long shot 'cause Suzuki tried to take waaaay too many short cuts. Look at the competition from KTM, Husky, Husaberg, Beta, Gas Gas etc. The new RMX is an over weight turd, with ridiculously short fuel range compared to them. No thanks, Suzuki. you've already lost the battle before you've even made it to the battlefield. I've said it 100x before & I'll say it again; take the basic package that is the DRZ 400, start from scratch and make it the way thousands of people have been asking for, for 10 years, and sales will go up significantly. Fire the cost accountants Suzuki and let the engineers do their jobs, then the customers will come. BJ
  13. 3BeeJay3

    MCCT from AVC better than Thumpertalks ??

    I have the Bitech unit (via AVC) on my DRZ. Well made, Works well, easy to install, doesn't leak, etc. I don't see how it could be 'way bigger and clunkier' that the TT version, as it appears to be about as small as it could realistically be made, considering how robust it is. (granted, I haven't held the 2 side by side in my hands) The Bitech one will easily out last several bikes. 59.95 Cad is approx. the same price(depending on that days exchange rate) as the TT version. Not bad, considering Canadian prices are usually 1.5 - 2x what Americans usually pay for stuff. BJ
  14. 3BeeJay3

    Unbelievable Title Requirements

    Go to a different licence office. They are making you get all that paperwork because they really don't know what they're doing, so they automatically say 'no'. You have all the docs you need to get that bike transferred to your name in Ontario.
  15. 3BeeJay3

    Peg weighting cornering-stand vs sit

    I always tell guys- 'learn to ride standing up until you can do it competently 100% of the time in any condition you encounter. Then, start sitting down to conserve energy in places where it makes sense to sit, or where it's faster to sit.' If a rider doesn't learn to handle the gnarly crap, mud, ruts etc. standing up, they'll likely never learn to get fast thru those sections sitting down. Just my opinion and observations. BJ
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