dinorex44

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About dinorex44

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  1. Thanks for the great suggestion of pulling the spark plug wire to verify the kill switch function. That should be the acid test. To avoid the unpleasant high voltage dance, I will wear a good glove :-) The Honda manual specifies checking the timing at 1100 RPM, so I assume one should be able to pull the timing mark cover off while the bike is running. Definitely would not be able to do that with this bike the way it sprays oil out the hole! Thanks
  2. I did check the bore, and it was fine. I didn't touch the valves, since I did not have any problems with them. I did not verify oil flow though the banjo bolt, so I will check that this weekend. I did pull one of the valve adjustment caps while it was running, and there was oil spray, so at least it is not dry up there, but it is possible the flow is not adequate. Could be the kill switch, but that was not a problem before the teardown. Of course that doesn't mean I didn't pinch a wire, which would be happy to find. Thanks for the suggestions.
  3. I needed to put a timesert in the spark plug hole of my XR600, since the threads were stripped, and while I was there, I replaced the piston and rings (rings were out of spec), cleaned the carbon off the head. I did not take the head apart (valves). After putting it all back together, it fires right up, but seems to warm up very quickly at idle and when I turn the ignition off, it often keeps going until I use the compression release to kill it (it is just my hand on the cylinder guess that it seems warmer than I would expect and the fact it keeps running with the ignition off, supports that conclusion). I checked for intake air leaks, and don't think there are any. I thought the timing might be wrong, so I went to check the timing per the Honda manual and it shoots oil spray out the timing check hole making it impossible to read. There appears to be a lot of crankcase pressure, so I disconnected the breather filter, but it still sprays oil (the oil level is normal). I used a standard compression/size Weisco piston and I double checked the numbers stamped on the piston. I also checked the ring gap before installing the rings. Everything was torqued to specs. Any help solving this issue would be appreciated. Thanks
  4. Thanks Horri, I will give the cable tie method a go. Best
  5. That is why I never took it out of the head. At first I was putting a punch in the hole on top of the tensioner and rotating it down so it was not putting pressure on the guide, but holding it there while doing other work was a pain. I later just put a little wedge between the tension and the head to keep it rotated out of the way. Is removing the tensioner a must to get the chain back on? To be honest, I am a bit nervous dealing with it, since it seems to need a special tool or cable tie tricks to get it back in place. This is one of those rare moments I miss the old two stroke :-) Thanks!
  6. Thanks for the tips. I was trying without the upper gear in place to no avail; however, the tensioner is in but retracted (pointing down). Is retracted not good enough?
  7. I did some top end work on my 96 XR600 and I am at the point of putting the cam back in, but I am having problems with the timing chain. It is not connecting to the gear on the bottom, so it can rotate freely. All attempts to get it back on the lower gear (hours!), and I can get it to go to one side or the other, but it won't stay on the lower gear. I just don't know what I am dong wrong. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
  8. I use diesel fuel. It is much safer than gas due to the much higher flashpoint, but it has the same disposal inconvenience. I keep in in a 1 gallon paint can and it can be reused quite a bit by pouring off the top 95% into a clean can after the dirt settles to the bottom. That way I only have to dispose of a small amout of contaminated feul. However, I have been thinking about switching to no-toil or some other water based system.
  9. I have ridden both, and for trails the XR400 is hard to beat. It handles great in the tight stuff, it is very reliable, and it does not overheat. The XR650 is really meant for the open desert, and it doesn't like tight trails. Besides not handling the tight stuff as well as the XR400, it has a nasty habbit of overheating if it is not moving. The XR650 was designed by Honda to keep them on the top of the Baja 500/1000 races. Hope this is helpful.
  10. If you are tall enought the CRF230 or TT230 are good trail bikes. A little heavier than the MXers, but much better behaved on the trail, and the electric start is a huge plus when you kill it in a dicey situation. They are also less expensive.
  11. If it got wet, probably corrosion. For the throttle, the cable would be my first suspect. That can be easly checked by removing the slide. For the kicking over problem, I would bet on the cylinder. If it is a two stroke, pulling the head would be the easiest way to check.
  12. With all due respect to the family that suffered the loss, IMO it was the riders own fault. Like many, I have learned the hard way that you never assume what is on the other side of a hill, and good riding practice is to come to a near stop as you approach the peak. If you choose not to do this, it is at your own risk. Even natural peaks have dangers on the other side. The area of the accident is peppered with open mine shafts, and vandels will remove markers, so the only realistic way to avoid this is to close the land. If enough people compalin/sue over this type of thing, that is excatly what will happen. When we do risky things with our bikes, we need to be prepared to accept the consequences of our actions. Just my $0.02.
  13. Thanks for the feedback with regard to the weight issue. 239 did seem stunningly low for a street legal 4 stroke big bore with e-start. The 250's seems more reasonable and still pretty good for the features. It is also good to know the bike carries it weight low. My friend has an XR400 that is only 14 lbs lighter than my 600, but it feels 50 lbs lighter!
  14. I have been looking for a lighter replacement for my XR600, and after reading the Dirt Rider article I starting considering the Husky. The one thing I was confused about was his statement that it was heavy even for an enduro. I have not seen any other street legal 400+ displacment bikes that are even close to as light as the the Husky's reported dry weight. Am I missing something?