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      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

reynolds_brad

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About reynolds_brad

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    TT Member

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  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    vintage small displacment horizontal 4 stroke honda motors
  1. Ill be there all weekend, wouldn't miss it. Leaving the DRZ at home though and taking the Honda APE this year.
  2. Here are my other two current projects. A 1979 CF70 (honda Chaly) The start. And where it sits now. still need to wire it and rebuild the 137 motor to fix a oil leak but other then that its finished. and a 1969/1970 Z50A I say both those years as some of it was from a 69 and some was from a 70. Ide say just about the most one off fab work ive done in a project so far and the bikes got a little way to go still. Made the carbon tank myself as well as the fenders. When finished it should have that clean no cable no wires look. Exhaust also doubles as a functioning tail light.
  3. So i guess you can say im actually a little more into the mini bike thing then the DRZ. Here are two of my mini projects. the first one is a 2002 Honda APE50 which I picked up in Aug of 08. Started out looking like this. keep in mind this bike nor none of the tuning parts for them are sold here in the states. However the US model XR100 was pretty similar, just about the same motors. So far ive changed out the forks, triples, swingarm, rear shock, wheels, brakes, headlight, gauge cluster, bars, carb, motor, body work, almost everything. The motors a takegawa 115 with a dry clutch and Yoshimura MJN26 carb. Most of the chassis and suspension components are by OVER Racing, as well as the wheels. The Forks are from a KSR110 (another non US model bike) and I've resprung them and added some custom valving work and preload adjusters. The bike down right hauls ass in the hills and I've often been able to make passes on full size bike riders if the road is tight and technical enough. Ive weighed the bike in with no fuel and it comes just shy of 140lbs. Another one of my projects has Been a Jincheng Panda (Honda Monkey Clone) I picked it up looking beat and battered and sunk my heart and soul into the thing. Here is the first pick i ever took of it when i brought it home. The bikes gone through a few iterations and different motor configurations. 108cc chinese 4 speed, 137cc Thai NICE motor with TJR tuning parts, 95cc 4speed, and now its running a Takegawa 124+R with Daytona Dry clutch. I wont get into all the details, people have told me the bike speaks for itself so i will let it do so this time. Here are a few pics of the bike throughout the years ending with the current.
  4. This is just the reason i ditched me 1000cc sportbike for the SM
  5. I know someone that runs this setup.
  6. Thanks i think i got it. So less unsprung weight but more sprung weight. Also wouldnt this raise the center of mass of the object (bike) slightly. My guess is there is a valuble trade off being that the bike should be able to respond better under intense conditions with less unsprung weight. >>>Excerpt from wikipedia.com on effects of unsprung weight>> Effects of Unsprung Weight The unsprung weight of a wheel controls a trade-off between a wheel's bump-following ability and its vibration isolation. Bumps and surface imperfections in the road cause tire compression--which induces a force on the unsprung weight. In time, the unsprung weight then responds to this force with movement of its own. The amount of movement is inversely proportional to the weight - a lighter wheel which readily moves in response to road bumps will have more grip when tracking over an imperfect road. For this reason, lighter wheels are often sought for high-performance applications. In contrast, a heavier wheel which moves less will not absorb as much vibration; the irregularities of the road surface will transfer to the cabin through the geometry of the suspension and hence ride quality is deteriorated. Pneumatic or elastic tires help by providing some springing for most of the (otherwise) unsprung mass, but the damping that can be included in the tires is limited by considerations of fuel economy and overheating. The shock absorbers, if any, damp the spring motion also and must be less stiff than would optimally damp the wheel bounce. So the wheels execute some vibrations after each bump before coming to rest. On dirt roads and perhaps on some softly paved roads, these motions form small bumps, known as washboarding or "corduroy" because they resemble smaller versions of the bumps in roads made of logs. These cause sustained wheel bounce in subsequent vehicles, enlarging the bumps. High unsprung weight also exacerbates wheel control under hard acceleration or braking. If the vehicle does not have adequate wheel location in the vertical plane (such as a rear-wheel drive car with Hotchkiss drive, a live axle supported by simple leaf springs), vertical forces exerted by acceleration or hard braking combined with high unsprung mass can lead to severe wheel hop, compromising traction and steering control. Though this is usually not considered important, at least in the popular literature, there is a positive effect. High frequency road irregularities, such as the gravel in an asphalt or concrete road surface, are isolated from the body more completely because the tires and springs act as separate filter stages, with the unsprung weight tending to uncouple them. This can improve overall safety.
  7. Can you explain to me how a set of forks can provide you with less unsprung weight?
  8. Well i was stock going 400SM for about a year, I was just waiting to pay the bike off before i started molesting its innards. About 4 months back i installed a Lukes racing 440 kit, FCR39, e base gasket and a whole bunch of other little goodies including a 38 tooth rear. My biggest complaint about the DZR was it sucked ass on the freeway. Outside of the weekend play i often commuted the bike from San Francisco to San Jose and back for work. Not to mention the nearest dirt road that i know of from me is a good 50 miles. Prior to the upgrades the bike Sucked a Ton of gas to keep up with the 80mph average freeway speeds, and i often felt that it had to be hard on the motor to pretty much keep it near pinned the whole way. I would be about a mile from home on the return trips and have to flip it to res. So my plan was to make the bike a better commuter and all around fun bike. So now with the 440, carb, gearing, etc the bike down right pulls harder compared to stock. I had someone else ride it that just has the FCR and she said it was a night and day difference to hers. As for commuting with the gearing change and added power i keep my Revs much lower at 75 80 mph and the fuel average actuall increased over what i was getting even with the larger added carb. For the squid factor, it now pulls up power wheelies in the first two, and clutches up with a little effort in 3rd. Prior i couldnt get it up in third no matter how i tried. Im a proponent of the Bore. How easy is the install? I did a quick writeup on another Forum if you want to check it out.
  9. Its doable. im in CA and all my pitbikes are street legal. Some of them can even do 80mph.
  10. thanks Eddie thats what i needed. Ive got radial on my minis i think its time to put one on the big bike.
  11. Hey Eddie, im looking on QTM's site for the radial bracket and i dont see one listed for a DRZ400SM which one did you use? the one for the RMZ450? Thanks
  12. That plus how are your points looking, You might want to fresh'n them up.
  13. suzuki would have sold countless numbers if they have created this.
  14. i say do both, thats what i just did. :thumbsup:
  15. The I ring chain i have is a DID.