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snaucler

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About snaucler

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    Washington
  1. I actually used to work in the R&D department at MSR about 10 years back. We used to put a lot of different fuels into those bottles, as the old XGK stove would burn just about anything. The only thing you don't want ot put into one of those bottles is alcohol. Alcohol in any aluminum bottle is a bad idea.
  2. The first thing is to try on as many different boots as possible without looking at the price. Once you figure out which boots fit best, then find those boots at the best price possible. You will never regret spending money on boots that fit and feel good, and you will where those boots. If you buy cheaper boots you will regret it everytime you put them on, and you will regret it until you spend the money on the boots that feel the best.
  3. Shoreline. '06 DRZ 400S Looking to do some trai riding this summer. Anyone in the are willing to offer a little guidance? PM me
  4. I watched a cop go into a rabid tirade at a pedestrian once, because the pedestrian began crossing an intersection less than a second after the "Don't Walk" light started flashing. The pedestrian saw it start flahing and and actually started trotting to make sure he could easily get across the intersection while he had a green light. The cop made the pedestrian stop when he was 3/4 of the way across the street and go back the way he came. Through this whole thing the pedestrian had a green light, but the "Don't Walk" light was flashing. I lost a lot of respect for the Seattle city police that day. You will never convince me that that officer did anything to enhance the safety of the situation. In fact the officer put the pedestrain at a higher risk to make a point. The police are not always right. The system does fail on a regular basis.
  5. mph

    I got my bone stock '06 S up to an indicated 92 mph. With a loose grip on the bars and all but laying on the tank, it wasn't half bad.
  6. I have the cheaper Crafstman jack and it works great. I can easily lift my DRZ. I'm not sure I understand what the shortcomings of this jack are, or what could be done to improve it. But then I don't spend a lot of hours with my bike on the stand.
  7. I'm feeling so inadequate after watching that. I'm still trying to figure out how to do a decent wheelie.
  8. For riding in the cold Seattle rain, I have found that sailing bibs over my regular riding pants works extremely well. I have some old Helly-Hansen bibs, but I think you can find some at West Marine for about $100 to $150.
  9. "Closed, um not the area I rode (which is the whole trail). The signs on the trail say it's closed to Jeeps/Quads and not recommended for motorcycles but not closed to them. It was more like a warm invite for crazy dirtbike riders..." That's how I remember it when I was there two years ago. Did you guys actually ride that section where the trail went down and right over a ledge section??? With the 1000' drop (It had t be several hudred) a couple of feet further to the right:eek: My buddy and I had a lot of fun on the mountain bikes riding there. I definitely want to take the DRZ down to that area.
  10. Moab is one of the most amazing areas in this country. If you haven't been there you need to visit it soon. It has not been spoiied yet, and I am not sure how long it will stay that way. I've been moutain biking there and one of the really cool things about this place is that the mtn bikers, the motorcyclists, and the 4 wheel drive people all seem to get along just fine. It is also fun to sit at one of the main street restaraunts and watch the 4WD's that look like they have been rolled over a few times and are missing body panels drive down main street. It's interesting they call it the "Slick Rock Trail". The rock was smooth, but the tires stick to it like nothing I've ever seen. I would think full on slicks would work great for 90% of the Slick Rock Trail. Somebody mentioned riding the Porcupine Rim Trail. Did you ride the whole loop?!?! There were a couple of 10' sections that would have been absolutely terrifying.
  11. I recently bought a pair of Sidi Crossfires. They were a bit spendy, but they are extremely comfortable and offer great protection. I feel I can even walk around in them comfortably. I would definately recommend these boots. If you think about it, say you buy a pair of boots, and they don't work out. Then you buy anoother pair of different boots, you will have spent more than the Sidis. Scott
  12. Wind Turbines, Hydro, Geo-Thermal. Hydrogen is not an energy source, it is a storage medium. It would be geat if pared with wind power which is intermittent.
  13. Plus 1 on that. That narration couldn't have been better! I hope you and the bike are unscathed.
  14. If I remember correctly, aluminum is not hardened by quenching like tool steel or 41XX Cro-Mo. It is heated up until the grain structure goes away and the metal becomes a homogenous structure. It is then cooled. At this point the grain structure reforms and the material is in a soft form. To harden the aluminum it must now be aged. Aging is the process where impurities precipitate out of the grains and migrate to the grain boundaries. These impurities now act like a piece of grit between two smooth surfaces and inhibit them from sliding along each other. This is what makes the aluminum "hard". Aging can be accomplished a couple of ways. One way is just like it sounds, you let the aluminum sit for a very long time. The other option is artificial aging. The material is heated up and the precipitation process is sped up considerably. Sorry if I am babbling, but it is late and things are a little fuzzy for me this time of evening.
  15. I'm not sure what alloy or temper thay use in these levers, but if they are tempered, heating them up to where they are easier to bend will definately affect their strength. If someone knows the alloy and temper, you may be able to re-heat treat them. Some tempering processes are within the temperature range of most kitchen ovens. They can also take a long time. Actually, you may be able to anneal a lever in your oven, bend it and re-heat treat it. If someone can fin out the alloy, I can find some times and temps for manipulating the properties.