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OldGuyJim

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About OldGuyJim

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    TT Newbie

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  • Location
    Oregon
  1. OldGuyJim

    aftermarket gas tank

    The cap on my Clark 3.0 split at just about 8 months. Called Clark and they said it was past warranty. Wound up buying a tusk cap. Love the tank, it fit nicely and other then the cap, no problems.
  2. OldGuyJim

    need to find more trails in southern oregon

    I ride quartz ck every week. ( I live 4 miles from the bottom) Miles and miles of single track up there. It's possible to go from quartz, to hog ck, then to stratton and then do a loop back to the top of quartz and down to hugo and back over to the back side of quartz. Technically the trails down by the river ( indian mary) are wild and scenic and are off limits (clearly marked) . There was enough snow free areas that we did 35 miles of single track on sunday. You guys can pm me if you want to get together for a ride.
  3. OldGuyJim

    Gearing Down

    I also run 13/51, (as well as a +13oz flywheel) but still find that on the really tight rocky stuff I can't lug down far enough and wind up bouncing around on the rocks. On top of that, the top end really suffers with 13/51 or 52. In my opinion, the r just does not have the right transmission gearing for the really tight technical stuff. Don't get me wrong, I love my r and ride the hell out of it but I have to do more shifting than I would like and work harder to get through tight stuff. As much as I hate to say it, my next bike will be an x. I'm willing to give up a little of the r punch for the x's wider tranny.
  4. OldGuyJim

    Vote Pro ORV Park Tonight

    Done. It would be nice to see a new place since the places we can ride are really shrinking quickly.
  5. OldGuyJim

    450R Trail Bike

    http://www.trailtech.net/flywheel_1.htm Happy with mine as well. Don't forget a quality flywheel puller. You'll need it.
  6. OldGuyJim

    Weighted flywheel

    As noted by others, a heaver flywheel will help with stalling if that is your goal. It also does a few other things, some you may like and others you may not. In my experience it depends on the type of riding you do and the amount of weight you add with the new flywheel. Nearly all of my riding is tight woods stuff with a few trips to the dunes. In southern oregon we are blessed with miles and miles of woods and single track trails. I used a 13oz trail tech flywheel on my 05 250r. It eliminated the stalling but it also took away the punch and mellowed out the power. It pretty much eliminated the wheel spin as well but it takes longer to get the revs up and they stay up better once there. I found that I was using then next gear up in some situations. As far a bottom end, I can't say it added bottom end, but it made the bottom more forgiving when riding in the woods. For the first year, I rode with the stock sprockets and was pretty happy but felt that I was shifting a lot and to often. This year I added one tooth to the rear sprocked. The bike lugs very nicely with one extra tooth on the rear but the top speed is down. The extra tooth changed the shift points and I find that I don't use 1st much anymore. The added flywheel weight and the extra tooth eliminated some of the shifting. I ride with a guy that has a 04 xr250. With the 13oz fw and the extra tooth in the rear on my bike, I can lug almost right down to where he can go. As would be expected, I can out gas and out climb his bike, but when it comes to the stuff we have to lug through, he can crawl just a little slower than I can. When we take a trip to the dunes, I switch back to the stock sprocket in the rear for a little more speed. All in all it made the bike smoother to ride and more like my old xr350. Not the same as the 350, but more like it. I'm comfortable with the way the bike rides, however, my next bike will be an x model because (in my opinion) the trannies in the r's are just not right for woods riding. I still do a lot of shifting. No matter what you do, the r's trannies just don't have the spacing or the gearing to be a smooth easy riding woods bike. In the end, I would say the heavier flywheel will make a huge improvement. As for how much weight to add, that's a tough one. The more you add the less punch the bike will have, but the smoother the power will be. It's a trade off. I went with a 13oz because I figured the 13oz was enough to smooth the bike out without over doing it with the 15oz. Simple as that. I came off the xr's and was trying to get that feel back. A note about the Trail Tech flywheels. You must use a rewound stator with the flywheel they sell for lighting. No if's, and or but's. You can not just put the "for lighting" flywheel on and expect to be able to add lights to the r.
  7. OldGuyJim

    CRF's Only

    And my o5 crf250r: http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/garage.php?do=viewattachment&attachmentid=20982
  8. OldGuyJim

    Fuel Tanks

    My 05 crf250r with a Clark 3.0 gal Natural. Although you can't see it, the first time I filled the tank, I marked it with a perm marker at 1gal and 2gal. With the natural tank, I have no problem determining how much fuel I have left. Don't know about IMS tanks, but the clark tank fit very nicely and I have had no issues with it. As you can see from my bike, I'm not into bling or even looks for that matter. Like every thing else added to my bike, the larger tank was added because I needed it for the type of riding we do. We often do 70 mile single track/dirt road rides and the tank gives me plenty of fuel and some to spare. My 250r with a Clark 3.0 gal Natural Fuel Tank I purchased the tank at MonkeyButtParts.com
  9. OldGuyJim

    Helmet Cam 101 Has Been Revised!!!!

    I have the same lanc, however, I was actually refering to the a/v cable that came with the camera from sony. Mine stuck out a good two inches before I modded it. I went with a little different approach and skipped the hard box. I was trying for the smallest, lightest and softest pack I could come up with as well as the least complicated cable set I could. I also wanted to be able to have a pack that allowed me to carry the other stuff I always carry. Water, tools, lunch, lightweight jacket...... I used a fox hydration backpack and made some foam that fits the camera and battery pack. I put the camera in the foam block with velcro wraps and then inside a water tight bag and then into the camel pack. It is easy enough to access when you want to change the tape or check the video. I made a custom cable that allows me to take off my helmet with the camera and mic still attached. Basically, I'm down to one cable for the helmet cam/mic and then another cable for the lanc. The lower half of the camera/mic cable as well as the lanc cable have a 4" loop in the pack for strain relief and then are threaded up through the shoulder harness of the camel pack. They stay there even when I don't bring the camera. The cable from the bullet, wraps around the to the back of the helmet and then plugs into the harness at the top front of the shoulder. The plug is a snug slip fit and is held in place by a velcro loop. In the event the helmet cable was snagged, it can pull out of the plug and pull free. The reason I started screwing with the cable is because 4 months after I started using the camera, the wires at the back of the bullet broke internally from strain. It was not an easy job fixing them, and by then, I was already up to my neck in wires so I just started rearranging stuff. I used a length of serial mouse cable. (6 shielded wires + ground). That gave me enough for video/ground, L/R Audio/ground, 12v+ and ground. My goal was to come up with an arrangement that allowed me to take off the helmet as well as take out the video camera and still use the pack without having to attach/unattach the cables and without having tons of extra cables and connectors. When I first got the camera, I was amazed at how many cables, adapters and connectors there were. Basically, I removed all of the connectors except for the one where the helmet attaches to the harness. Pictures of the pack (before the water tight bag): http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721271690.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721280695.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721305064.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721312250.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721315333.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721323449.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721331260.jpg&s=f5 http://putfile.com/pic.php?pic=5/14721340661.jpg&s=f5 For the cam and mic batteries, I use 8 aa nimh rechargables. So far, they have lasted the full day without an issue and when I'm sitting having lunch and stuff, I unplug the helmet and that disconnects the battery pack. Before I made the cable, there was no way to disconnect the batteries without opening the pack. I had added a small switch to the 12v line but that was bulky and my goal was to get all of the controls up to the front shoulder harness. Unplugging works almost as well since when I want the camera off, I usually also have my helmet off. Not always, but in those cases, It's no biggie to just unplug the helmet. As you said, remembering to plug back in (or turn the switch back on) will be an issue. When my helmet is unpluged, the plug is right up front where I can see it when I look down to check the lanc light. For the video camera, I use aftermarket (ebay) recharagable lithium ion batteries. They are good for about 5 hours. As long as I carry a spare, then I'm good for the day. They also came with a charger that runs on either 110v or a cigarette lighter or any 12v source. An issue is the tapes. They only last an hour. I purchased a 2gig memory stick but have not had a chance to use it yet. My other issue is that I've taped more than I will ever have time to edit. Someday I'll get the 200+ hours of tape edited...... What's even more frustrating is the fact that I know how nice the video looks in full res avi, but have'nt found a codec that will come anywhere near that. (i've tried many). When you reduce a 1gig avi file down to 25 megs (putfile) for the internet, it just plain stinks. Where in Oregon are you? Jim
  10. OldGuyJim

    Helmet Cam 101 Has Been Revised!!!!

    >LANC jack, it does NOT work when you are also using the a/v inputs! I know this has been a while, but, I use Sony DCR HC32 with a lanc controler and it works just fine. All I do is plug in the lanc, the helmet cam and I can turn the camera on when needed with just the lanc button. Push the button on the controller once for on, (the light on the controller turns green), push it again and it records (light red) until I push it a third time (back to green). Push and hold the button for 2 seconds (light flashes) and the camera goes off. I use one of the little disk shaped lanc controls. I do know that there are two versions of that lanc control and the dcrhc32 camera will not work correctly with the wrong one. You can find more info here: http://www.jonescam.tv So how did you get arround the fact that the factory a/v cable sticks straight out of the side of the camera and no one that I found makes a right angle plug. I wound up cutting the strain releif off of the factory cable and then heated and bent the little end. Works great now.
  11. OldGuyJim

    2005 CRF 250r

    I'll second the Clark 3.0 tank. I got the natural (it's actually semi transparent) and fits great. I marked the tank as I filled it up the first time. I marked it at 1 gallon and two gallons and it does hold a full 3 gallons. Although I can ride hard for 6 hours on 2 gallons, the extra gallon is nice for that extra hour or two of riding. We have never had to turn back or plan our rides around a fuel stop. Best price I found was at monkeybutt and the guys there were great to work with. They went out of their way to help when I had questions about other parts I purchased. Clark 3.0 Tank at Monkeybutt About $157.00 last I looked.
  12. OldGuyJim

    Hill Climbing in the Woods Vid

    Thanks. It worked out pretty good for that hill. It was a new hill we found just passing buy and the entrance was covered in brush. I had to clear the part where the trail droped off the road. Otherwise, I would have just blasted away.
  13. OldGuyJim

    Hill Climbing in the Woods Vid

    Yea, it was a little steeper than it looks. The angle of the trees is the giveaway. I was actually a little bummed when I first starting shooting vids by how much is lost in depth. Fortunatly, my goal for doing the videos is to share the experience and fun with others and not to impress people with the type of riding I do, or don't do. Stop by the next time you're out on the west coast and we'll ride. If you like the woods, we have miles and miles. I have tons more tape (that day, and many others), just not much time to edit it. I didn't want to start off with my best stuff. What would I do for an encore. Hopefully, I'll get more posted next week and lots more later this summer after the woods are closed and before steelhead season heats up. Although I'm 47, the reference to Old Guy is really just what the people I ride with call me. With the exception of my long time riding partner (he's 51) , all of the other people I ride with are 30 or younger. To them, I am the Old Guy. Thanks much.
  14. OldGuyJim

    Hill Climbing in the Woods Vid

    We have nice packed forest debris (like the hill in the video) as well as, red gumbo, black gumbo, decomposed granite, shale, packed volcanic ash, volcanic debris (packed ash mixed with small rocks and the occasional watermelon size rock) and several lava beds. The red and black gumbos are the worst in the rain. Slick, slick, slick... We are pretty lucky since we can usually ride all year except for a few weeks in winter when there is snow in the hills, and then they close things down from July until the end of September because of fire season. It makes for some fun and interesting riding.
  15. OldGuyJim

    Hill Climbing in the Woods Vid

    The dirt was just damp. It was sweet all day. One of those days you wait all winter for. You could pretty much hook up any where you went.
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