• Announcements

    • Bryan Bosch

      JUST IN!   04/24/2018

      HOW TO: 4-STROKE PISTON REPLACEMENT DONE RIGHT!

ScottRNelson

Members
  • Content count

    2,451
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

542 Excellent

About ScottRNelson

  • Rank
    TT Titanium Member

Profile Information

  • Location
    California
  • Interests
    Riding motorcycles
  1. Yeah, but a turn signal flasher is about the easiest thing to fix on the bike. And the original flasher on my bike was already screwed up when I got it. If the current one dies, I'll probably have to give in and get a Genuine Honda part to replace it with.
  2. Do you drain your carburetor before letting the bike sit? It has been eight or nine years since I've opened up my carburetor. If you don't let gas sit in them when they're not being used, normally nothing degenerates. I see posts all the time about people cleaning their carburetors and I'm trying to figure out why I don't seem to ever have to do it on any of the carbureted bikes that I've owned. As for cutting out at higher RPMs, the main jet should be the only thing doing any work when you get the throttle wide open. I would be looking at fuel delivery from the fuel tank, including air getting through the gas cap into the tank as well as getting through the petcock and fuel line.
  3. I've been through at least four flasher relays on my bike. The original one looked like it had spent some time in a swamp, so no wonder it didn't work really well. I got a cheap one at an auto parts store that plugged into the same connector and it worked for a few years, then died. The next one, which was electronic rather than mechanical, lasted about six months. I finally stopped by a local NAPA auto parts store and asked for the best one they had. And I kept the receipt just in case, since it had a one year warranty. So far, so good.
  4. Here's the dyno chart of two 2001 XR650Ls. The lower power one is stock, but with pipe, carburetor and airbox modifications. Mine, which has better power, has pretty much the same stuff plus a 10.5:1 piston and displaces 675 ccs.
  5. Only a few people here feel that the OEM carburetor is junk. I'm perfectly happy with how mine works. A flat slide carburetor is a bit quicker to give you power when you first open the throttle, but it doesn't make much difference after that. My throttle response is "good enough", so I've never felt the need to upgrade the carburetor. I can get the front wheel up in first and second gear to get over obstacles off road, so I don't see a big advantage to a flat slide on my bike, unless I want to start doing second gear wheelies on the street regularly or something. In my opinion, it is the DynoJet kit that is junk, but a few people around here disagree on that too.
  6. I generally adjust the chain when I put on a new rear tire. Modern chains don't generally need regular adjustment. The way I check that the chain is adjusted properly is with the bike on the sidestand and the suspension fully extended, I push down on the chain right in the middle, at the back of the black plastic slider thingy on top of the swingarm. If I can just get the chain to touch the end of it, the adjustment is right. If you can get it to touch the swingarm behind it, the chain is too loose. Better loose than tight. Changing the oil at 500-600 miles on a new bike sounds about right. The manual says to change the oil and filter at 600 miles.
  7. My bike did that when I first got it. I turned up the idle until it stopped doing that. No issues since then.
  8. It had better have a bigger range. My 990 typically gets 30 mph with a high of 35, which means that I'm hunting for fuel after 120 miles. I'm hoping for at least 150.
  9. The 790 will be a twin and have quite a bit more power than the 690 single. If it's lighter than my 990 Adventure and handles at least as good in the dirt I'll be happy with it and will buy one. I want something different from an adventure bike than from a dual sport and that's why I have one of each.
  10. I don't bother reading spark plugs, I see how it runs at full throttle in the upper RPM range to determine if the main jet is the right size. I've reduced how much air gets through the airbox, or increased it (remove side cover on XR650L) to see how that changes things. One that is right, I pay attention to the midrange to figure out if the metering needle should go up or down. Only then can I fiddle with the pilot jet and idle mixture screw. Others have posted here how to get the idle mixture right, which actually can be done first if you want, and is usually independent of the other stuff. I watched a cool video last night with Kevin Cameron explaining how to read spark plugs. Watch it, you might learn something useful.
  11. Dakar is limited to 450cc motorcycles currently. They're all single cylinder special bikes that they don't seem to sell to the public. But I like that thing with the Harley engine. I would ride that.
  12. Two thumbs up for riding that heavy thing around a motocross track like that with all of those little bikes.
  13. I have a friend with a 525 EXC, which was the model before the 500 EXC and basically the same bike. He said the stock seat was "a plank" and after switching it over to a Super Moto setup for awhile eventually quit riding it on the street altogether. If you need to ride 200 miles to get to the dirt you want to ride, it is NOT a good choice. My 990 Adventure, was great at that part, and still handled the rough and rocky dirt hills I went for on my last big dirt trip. The XR650L would have been better in the dirt part, of course, but not as good, nor as enjoyable on the 200 mile trip back home afterward.
  14. Oops! Didn't read the fine print. Oh well.
  15. They tend to be that way when they're brand new. (Check thread title.)