Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'grease'.

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Dirt Bikes
    • General Dirt Bike Forums
    • Make / Model Specific
    • Dirt Bike Technical Forums
    • Special Interest Forums
    • Dirt Bike Regional Discussion
  • General
    • General Forums
  • ATV / UTV
    • General ATV / UTV Forums
    • Make/Model Specific
    • ATV / UTV Regional Discussion
  • Inside TT
    • Community Sponsors
    • Advertise on ThumperTalk
    • Site Usage, Bug Reports & Suggestions
  • ThumperTalk Clubs FAQ & Help's FAQ/Help & Discussion
  • Chadwick, Missouri: Information & Riding's Topics
  • So Cal Flattrack's Club Forum
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Discussion
  • Jersey MX and offroad's Places you ride
  • Jersey MX and offroad's Discussion
  • SE Ohio Riders's Club Discussion
  • NorCal Trail Riders's Topics
  • Northern Nevada Roaming Bastards's Discussion
  • North Texas Enduro Riders's Topics
  • Twistin it in PHX's Introduce yourself!
  • Twistin it in PHX's Discussion
  • So-Cal Track and Trail's 1st club ride coming soon...
  • Moto TnT Track & Trail's Moto Tnt Racing Questions
  • Moto TnT Track & Trail's Rider's Forum
  • Dualspot Riders Orange County So~CaL's Club Discussion
  • Chester County PA DS/Adventure's Im here
  • Chester County PA DS/Adventure's Ride Dates & Times
  • Niagara region's Club Discussion
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Unanounced ride(s) recap(s)
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Supplements & recovery aids
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Bikes maintenance & restoration
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Safety gear & apparel
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's General
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Riding technique
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's Club Discussion
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's Info from another club
  • NC woods riders.'s Club Discussion
  • Colorado US Route 50 Rides's Club Discussion
  • Middle GA Off-Road & Trails's Club Discussion
  • WNY Dual Sport Trail Riders's General Discussion's
  • SoCal JUST RIGHT riding club's SUNDAY 10.13
  • OREGON Riders Club's Club Discussion
  • Glamis bike crew's Topics
  • Glamis bike crew's One last trip
  • Glamis bike crew's Let’s hit the dunes!
  • South Texas Dirt riders's Topics
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Trail equipment and how to carry it
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's General Discussion
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Introduce Yourself
  • New England riders's Events
  • SC Dirt Riders's Topics
  • Club RMX's Photos and videos
  • Club RMX's Engine & Engine tuning
  • Club RMX's Chassis, Suspension, & tuning
  • Club RMX's Electrical and electronics
  • Club RMX's Body, fender, & Graphics
  • Club RMX's Build projects
  • Club RMX's Everything else
  • Club RMX's Classifieds
  • North GA Trail Riders's Topics
  • NorOnt Trail Riders's Topics
  • Virginia Supermoto's Club Discussion
  • Kentucky Trail Riders Club's Topics
  • ADK ADV's Notes
  • Pennsylvania Dirtbike Riders's introductions
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's General discussion
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's General discussion
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's Adventurepalooza 2021
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's Organized ride section
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's Gpx files
  • Missouri Dual Sport Riders's For sale items
  • WISCONSIN TRACK RIDERS's Racing
  • Yamaha WRz's Topics

Categories

  • Powersports Gear & Apparel
  • Universal Parts & Accessories
  • Parts & Acc. - Japanese Bikes
    • Honda Parts & Accessories
    • Kawasaki Parts & Accessories
    • Suzuki Parts & Accessories
    • Yamaha Parts & Accessories
  • Parts & Acc. - Euro Bikes
    • Beta Parts & Accessories
    • Husqvarna Parts & Accessories
    • KTM Parts & Accessories
    • Other Euro Parts & Accessories
  • Motorcycles
    • Off-Road Motorcycles
    • Dual Sport Motorcycles
    • Street Motorcycles

Products Categories

Vehicles Categories

Garages

Blogs

  • Speed Through Fitness
  • Moto Mind
  • Test Blog
  • Trail Tales of Enduro in South America
  • Michael File
  • Greg 198
  • Jason Bohl
  • Cole B
  • Loves dirt
  • RodneyBell
  • Johnnyship
  • michael
  • chunky bits of metal in oil

Calendars

  • ThumperTalk Clubs FAQ & Help's Club Calendar
  • Chadwick, Missouri: Information & Riding's Events
  • So Cal Flattrack's Club Calendar
  • So Cal Flattrack's Events
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Club Calendar
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Events
  • SE Ohio Riders's Events Calendar
  • NorCal Trail Riders's Ride & Event calendar
  • Northern Nevada Roaming Bastards's Stuff that happens on a particular date
  • Central Washington riders's Events
  • Central Washington riders's Group ride?
  • Central Washington riders's Events
  • Dualspot Riders Orange County So~CaL's Events Calendar
  • Niagara region's Club Events Calendar
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's I love Mondays trail ride
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's Events Calendar
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's First round of Hollister 2020
  • NC woods riders.'s Club Calendar
  • Colorado US Route 50 Rides's Club Calendar
  • Middle GA Off-Road & Trails's Club Calendar
  • OREGON Riders Club's Club Calendar
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Calendar
  • North County San Diego - DirtbikesWithDad.com's 2020 Calendar
  • Club RMX's Calendar
  • North GA Trail Riders's Ride Calendar
  • Virginia Supermoto's Club Calendar
  • Kentucky Trail Riders Club's Events

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


Facebook


Instagram


Twitter


TikTok


YouTube


TeleGram


LinkedIn


Website


Interests

Found 5 results

  1. My 2012 klr 650 makes a hissing/ scraping noise when pushed forward it becomes louder when riding and sometimes makes a click consistent with the revolutions: It only has 6,000 miles on it. It does sit sometimes and collects sawdust like a motherf***** that I clean off with compressed air but sometimes I don’t clean as often as I should. So should I grease or be tightening anything?? This noise doesn’t need brakes applied to happen but it does get worse (the hissing/scraping) when brakes are applied.
  2. How to install Zerks (grease nipples) into the later model 400E swingarms. I am installing a 2007 new-old-stock swingarm on to my 2004 green DRZ but would lose 3 of the 5 factory Zerks. By copying the grease gallery locations on the old swingarm it can be done. Greasing won't stop the shafts from seizing but it will certainly keep the needle bearings free from dirt / moisture / corrosion. Naturally this would be better if performed without the bearings installed as it would save a lot of cleaning afterwards. Centre bearing gallery location is on the circular boss - see punch mark Outer bearing gallery location is on the semi-circular boss. 1 on top & 1 below The swingarm needs to be level when drilling the centre bearing gallery. Even though the casting is mostly hollow there is a web all the way through where the gallery goes. From the sound it makes when tapping on it, it is not that much larger than the hole size. Drill 5.2 mm for the Suzuki M6 x 0.75 fittings. The gallery is 75mm long, and taking care, can just be accomplished without a long series drill bit. The outer galleries are a walk in the park. The swingarm needs to be level for drilling the centre bearing gallery! If you get it right the drill will exit between the 2 needle races. OEM Zerk orientation
  3. I've read here and there about regular greasing and lubing on the YZ250 / YZ250X, as well as noted the recommendation in the manual (same manual for both bikes, see image), though I do not think it consolidates all of the grease and oil points into one checklist, hence this post. As a sort of newbie getting back into dirt bikes after a long time (as a kid I only fixed things after they broke), plus being new to the YZ250 platform, I'd appreciate any suggestions one what you grease or lube and how often (and maybe even with what product). Thanks!
  4. Bike is a 1999 Suzuki RM125. I had the crankshaft rebuilt, so during the install I had put in new crank bearings, new crank seals, new case gasket, new reeds, and a new top end. I also cleaned the carb and put in the recommended jets for my exhaust and elevation/temperature. I run 32:1 fuel mix. I also put in a new primary gear, which is what contacts the oil seal. I put axle grease into the seal before inserting the primary gear. The bike smokes more than it should, and I'm pretty sure the cause is that transmission oil is leaking into the crankshaft area and eventually getting into the cylinder. I would top off the oil and check the level with the little bolt on the side of the clutch cover. After a while of riding I would take the bolt out and I would have to tip the bike quite a bit for anything to come out. I don't understand why it could leak. I also topped off the coolant, and the level stayed the same, so that's not leaking. Do you think its still getting in through the seal? If not, where could it get in from? There was quite a discussion as to the orientation of the seal itself here, but since that post I have installed a new seal with spring side out (which is different than most bikes, but I think that's what the manual says).
  5. Grease is a tool used so universally around the world but remains somewhat of a mystery for many of the people who use it. Every motorcycle needs grease at some point and there are several different areas where it is applied. Although grease manufacturing is a somewhat complex process it is somewhat seen as an art and each company’s methods and exact formulas are different. This results in sometimes subtle but sometimes drastic differences in products. The basic formula for grease is this: base oil, thickener and additives. Base oils can be anything from petroleum to synthetic to plant based oils. There are several different commonly used thickeners. The most common types are lithium, aluminum and calcium sulfonate. The additives used are dependent on the type of grease and the purpose of the grease. Base Oil: The base oil composition of a grease will impart a few crucial properties: Table 1: Basic base oil comparison The reason synthetics are less versatile than non-synthetic base oils is because of synthetic types likes silicone and poly-alyklene glycol (PAG). These types of oil are usually only meant for very specific industrial applications and are unsuitable in many others, so care is needed when selecting grease to avoid these types of synthetics in many instances. With that same reason in mind, additive selection is also more limited with these alternative synthetic options. However, plant based oils are still generally less versatile due to the temperature constraints they are typically limited by to. Thickener: Different thickener types have different performance attributes distinct to each type. Here are the most common types of base grease thickeners used for multipurpose motorcycle greases. Lithium offers a good water resistance, heat tolerance and mechanical stability. It is currently the least expensive type of grease to make so it is very prevalent in the marketplace. The drawbacks of it compared to other types are that it is not completely waterproof and will accept moisture over time. Aluminum is practically waterproof but is more expensive to manufacture than lithium grease. It offers high temperature stability, but is slightly less mechanically stable than other types. Calcium sulfonate has excellent high temperature, low temperature and inherent properties that allow it to use fewer additives to obtain certain performance levels. Its water resistance is excellent and it is often compatible with other greases. The big drawback to calcium sulfonate is the price. It is typically much more expensive than either of the other two types to produce. A grease complex is a variation of the standard base grease that is possible to make with lithium and aluminum. Aluminum and lithium complex greases exhibit higher temperature limits and better mechanical stability than their uncomplexed counterparts. All three of the grease types listed are often compatible with one another up to around 25% contamination with one type and 75% of the other. Beyond that 3:1 ratio though, incompatibilities are more common and certain properties may be sacrificed if mixed. There are many other types of thickener types I haven’t mentioned but those are rarely, if ever, used for the types of greases commonly used for motorcycle. Additives: Common additives for greases include: anti-oxidation, anti-corrosion, anti-wear and extreme pressure(EP) additives. Additional types are certainly used, but those are going to be found in a lot of greases with perhaps the exception of extreme pressure additives if the grease is not labeled as EP grease. One last fairly universal additive is dye. Most greases are dyed some color and many people believe these colors mean something. Let me be absolutely clear here so there is no confusion; THE COLOR DOES NOT MATTER. The colors are arbitrary and chosen by the manufacturer for aesthetics and nothing else. They may have their own standards and reasons for why they color certain grease a certain way, but it is not to conform to any industry standard. Grease Applications & Properties: Grease has some advantages over oil in certain applications. It can be applied in open areas without a sump or reservoir. It forms a significantly stronger physical barrier on a surface making it more suitable in extreme applications. It can utilize solid lubricants more effectively than liquids can. There are basically two types of greases commonly used in most motorcycles. They are assembly grease used during engine building or repairs and multipurpose greases for everything else. Multipurpose greases are usually good for bearings, axles, pivots and really any grease point on a bike. Assembly lubricants usually contain a high level of solid lubricants and provide lubrication to machine internals that are normally lubricated by oil or special applications that require a high content of solid additives. The purpose of assembly lubricants is to provide lubrication on parts that have never been exposed to engine or gear oil yet, so when the bike is started for the first time after maintenance; those parts have some protection before the regular lubricant begins circulating. These assembly greases are usually washed away by the oil and are removed from the system during subsequent oil changes. Another application for these products are areas such as final drives where a high content of solid additives can be beneficial for surface protection. Most grease points on motorcycles are fairly low load compared to more extreme grease applications in commercial applications. This means specialized grease is rarely needed and a single multipurpose grease is usually able to serve all of those grease points. They go into places that are open and exposed, high load or in places that oil films cannot be maintained. Bearings, axles and chassis linkages are common applications for these greases. They generally will provide extreme pressure protection and decent anti-wear protection. Because they form a physical barrier against water and oxygen, corrosion protection is inherently high, but this is also often boosted further by additives to protect against rust and corrosion. They should maintain a physical barrier to keep out moisture and dirt from these applications that would self destruct very quickly if contaminated. Grease does all of this through both physical and chemical means and there are a few key points to consider when choosing the right grease for your application. First and foremost is the grease consistency or hardness. This property for grease is just as important as the viscosity is for oil. Using an incorrect grease consistency can quickly result in part failure and under-lubrication. Grease is categorized into different grades by the National Lubricating Grease Institute (NLGI) scale based on a grease’s penetration test result. Grease penetration is a measurement of the depth at which a calibrated metal cone will penetrate into the surface of grease when dropped form a standard height. Penetration is represented in decimillimeters (tenths of a millimeter), and the penetration is often taken under two different conditions: worked and unworked. An unworked grease is fresh from the container and has never been used. A worked grease is one that has been put through mechanical stress to simulate usage. The purpose is to indicate the stability of the grease with regards to its consistency. Working grease is a standard process that involves a piston churning the grease a standard number of times using an instrument known as a grease worker. The standard method uses a plunger with 60 holes in it and it is pushed a pulled a total of 60 times in 1 minute. Figure 1: Mechanical Grease Worker (please imagine there are 60 holes in the piston face) After that minute, the grease is considered worked and can now be tested for NLGI consistency. The grades identify significant differences in the hardness or softness of greases. The simplest way I find to describe them is to compare them to common foods. Table 2: NLGI grades and consistencies. Another important property of grease is the base oil viscosity. During the manufacture of base grease, the ingredients of the thickener are mixed with oil. When the grease reaction takes place, that oil becomes part of that grease. Typically the higher viscosity the oil, the more heavy duty application it can withstand. However higher viscosity base oils usually limit the low temperature performance, so for general purpose grease, a base oil blend balanced for moderately high and low temperature performance is preferable. Assembly grease typically contains a high level of solid lubricant meant to withstand high pressure and remain in place in the absence of the regular lubricant that would normally protect the surface. The reason this regular lubricant needs replacing is usually because the machine is rebuilt and hasn’t had the oil circulation system running yet. These greases don’t need to have a very long usable lifespan since they are designed to be used up fairly quickly, washed away by the oil and removed by either a filter or through the next oil change. Therefore, anti-oxidation and long term stability are not key features for assembly lubricants. However, another application for assembly greases comes from the typical high level of solid lubricants. Since these solid lubricants will resist extreme loads there are applications in some bikes that call for a grease like this such as final drive shaft gears. Grease application is an aspect that a lot of people have difficulty with as well. I often see comments implying to just pump in as much grease as a bearing can hold and that is how much it should use. That advice is almost universally bad. Over-packing a bearing can lead to some very bad failures. Alternatively too little grease is also a problem for more obvious reasons; under-lubrication and all that goes with it being the biggest of them. You can read about the pitfalls of these mistakes and how to avoid them here. So I hope that gives you a good basic starting point to look at greases and you are now armed with the knowledge to at least ask the right questions when trying to choose between different brands of grease.
×
×
  • Create New...