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Found 27 results

  1. MUSTANGBOY22

    Suzuki DR-Z400S (2009)

    0 comments

    Love the bike so far, I've order a jet kit, exhaust, sm front fender, fender eliminator
  2. baironhorse

    Gps.. new to this

    I'm Looking at a Garmin etrex 20 I could get for about $80....basically need something to attach to my bike when riding in dense single track trails....I read a few posts and they get to technical....I need something to find my way back and will work deep in the Bush...beside s unit what else what I need? Plead help and guide me.
  3. Hi guys, putting the finishing touches on my build and was wondering about your opinions on what would be a better choice between a cigarette lighter port or a USB port. I think I'd mainly use it for my iPhone which means I could use either one, but the USB would be more streamline, eliminating the big piece between the phone's usb cable and the cig lighter. But the cig lighter could have more uses...Hmmm. Also, does anyone know which is smaller between the two, or are they roughly the same size? I've never even seen one of those external motorcycle USB port thingies. Looking forward to showing you guys my bike as soon as it's finished. Getting another box from the boys at Highway Dirt Bikes hopefully this week. Got a nice heavy box from Race Tech last week, woohoo! Knee is healing great, doc says I can ride on the street in 4-6 weeks. No dirt until March though. This forum is great, I don't post much but I read pretty much every post and am thankful for you guys and the wealth of knowledge here. I've learned tons about my bike and am stoked about the goodies I've bolted onto it. I've made a bad choice here and there; I was stoked about getting my new Shorai battery but then read they weren't all that great. Also bought 7/8's ProTaper bars, tapped out the ends, and then decided I loved the look of Gnath's fat bar setup with no crossbar and am getting fat bars, wasting the ProTaper bars. Oh well. I haven't ridden I once since I've added a bunch of fun stuff and have no Idea what to expect, but freaking can't wait. My bike is gonna be awesome,!!!
  4. Dose anyone know if it's possible to hard wire an iPhone charger on an MX bike? Bike is 2007 CRF 450R? If you have a link for a source that would be awesome.
  5. thorns_nz

    2010 450 Engine hours

    I am considering purchasing a 2010 450 with 71 hours on the clock. Bike is in great shape, one owner from new, and the vibe I get from the owner is that it has been looked after extremely well, regular oil/filters etc, swing arm/linkage bearings all fresh. Question is, how many hours would you suggest on the motor before opening her up? The bike comes with the spares kit so I would have all the pieces to put a fresh top end in, would you do it straight away, or wait til closer to 100hours? Would it pay to do the bottom at the same time, or can I expect a lot more time out of that? What about the valve train? Its had the valves clearances checked by a workshop 5 hours ago and all within spec, Coming up to 100 hours, would you be looking at new valves and springs anyway? Any other things to look out for? I know about the gas in the oil, and he assures me he has had no issue with this, and is more than happy to drop the oil for me to have a smell for myself. Bike has pretty much had all the list of mods as per the MXA article here ( http://motocrossactionmag.com/news/mxas-used-motocross-bike-guide-how-to-setup-your-2010-honda-crf450 ) , minus the linkage and pipe, but has been fully revalved for a rider my weight, and he is the same ability as me, so should be pretty close to good in that aspect. Any thoughts on the above ramblings?
  6. Dirtysdad

    Kawasaki KX250F (2015)

    0 comments

    Bike is awesome! Kid loves it. Especially the oversized front brake.(stock). Need to put some Michelin's on her.A Yoshimura slip-on,(we ride in the limited class)and Factory Connection suspension.<br />
  7. Agent2

    El Cheapo, Removable Helmet Light

    For those of us who aren't hardcore night riders with hundreds of dollars in lighting, but still like to go out for the occasional night ride, this inexpensive mod might be the ticket to a little more candlepower. I bought a Coleman Max Headlamp (model 1571) at Wally World for less than $20. This is an L.E.D "flashlight" meant to be strapped on your head (coal miner style). Output is stated as 105 lumens, 3 AAA batteries will last 6 hours on high. I removed the headband, peeled off the rubber comfort strip and glued on a piece of Velcro, the baseplate has about the same curvature as a helmet. In stock form, there are click stops to adjust the angle of the light, but when mounting the light on the top of a helmet, the barrel must be rotated 90 degrees, making the stock click stops ineffective, some more Velcro glued to the barrel body and baseplate solve this problem. One more strip of Velcro glued to the helmet and you are done. The light only weighs a few ounces, so I didn't notice any difference in my helmet weight wise. The on/off switch is easy to find and use, even with riding gloves on. As a test, I did a daylight run up to 90 m.p.h., the light was still attached to the helmet however, I did use an epoxy to attach the Velcro, as I doubt the self stick Velcro would stay as well attached. Although this light is obviously not powerful enough to use as a headlight, it does put out a decent amount of light and mounted on your helmet, it will point where you are looking, making it ideal for "what was that?" situations, as well as trailside bike inspections, and checking out your campsite for creepy crawlies after the night ride is done.
  8. egnaro

    Let the mods begin...

    I've been looking for a dual sport motorcycle for a little while, reading reviews and browsing forums to pass the time during the winter months. Long story short, I recently acquired a lightly used 2013 with very few kilometers. There's a good thing about getting a new bike at this time of the year...... time for mods before the season starts!! First off was heated grips, which turned into heated grips, new grips, and hand guards...... I decided on the Barkbuster VPS backbone with Storm Guards, pillowtop grips, and some aerostich heated grips kit i had already. Sorry no pics of the installation. I found the info here quite useful for the relay wiring. http://www.canyonchasers.net/shop/generic/relay.php I wired the relay switch wire to the rear light so the grips are only on with the ignition. No clearance issues with the Barbusters (stock bars), although had to remove some of the cable ties. More to come........
  9. Adrenolin

    Yamaha WR250R (2015)

    0 comments

    My FIRST motorcycle at 46 years of age! Bought this 2015 Yamaha WR250R brand new from the dealer back in Oct 2015 with 4 miles on it. Most of my miles are street and highway but hit the dirt often and whenever I can. Simply love this bike! I'm currently setting it up for Adv Riding and it'll be seeing more of the USA and Canada this and following years. No trailers, no rear carriers.. just me, the bike and the miles we pass.
  10. Bryan Bosch

    ProTaper Introduces Wireless Hour Meter

    IRVINE, CA – May 20, 2015 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Remember the old, “you can pay me now… or you can pay me later” ad campaign? As great as the current crop of street bikes, MX machines, PWC and snowmobiles may be, their highly tuned engines do require some service work. Monitoring maintenance intervals can be something of a guessing game, but also something you will pay dearly for if you neglect to service your ride! “Eliminate guesswork on when it is time for service with ProTaper’s wireless hour meter,” suggests ProTaper Brand Manager Paul Perebijnos. “The simple and user-friendly design employs wireless, peel and stick installation.” Although ProTaper made their reputation in moto, the hour meter works for virtually any powersports enthusiast. “Off-road, on-road, 2-stroke or 4-stroke, watercraft or sled, ATV or UTV, the wireless hour meter works on literally everything.” Utilizing vibration-sensing technology to track the life of your vehicle, ProTaper thinks this is a good way to save time. “Priced less than $50, think of the ProTaper hour meter as cheap insurance against catastrophic failure,” adds Paul. The fully sealed housing and IP68-rated plastic case was designed to withstand the elements, while solid state circuitry enables the ProTaper hour meter to take a licking and keep on ticking! Double-sided tape and zip-tie grooves make sure you don’t lose track of time by having your hour meter fall off on the track. “It is CE-certified and should outlive most machines,” concludes Perebijnos. “Especially those that fail to get serviced at proper intervals!” Details: MSRP $49.99 Easy to read display Small and lightweight Up to 999.5 total engine hour count (not resettable) Up to 999.5 partial engine hour count (resettable) IP68 resistant plastic case CE-certified Double sided tape included
  11. michaelg131

    Suzuki DR650S (2015)

    0 comments

    Recently I sold my CRF250L due to taking a new job with a 104 mile daily commute. I again almost purchased the WR250 but I decided if highway comfort, simplicity, and displacement were my prime concerns that the WR would still not fit my needs. Out of the shop I noticed that it was idling too low and stalling quite a bit. The bike easily reached 80mph for my ride home even though at this speed the vibrations were killer. I rode on it untouched for about 2 weeks and practically paid for expedited shipping from seat concepts. My other first impression of the bike was wondering where they had time to go to home depot and replace the seat with a 4x4 post. The other complaints were the rubber mounted stock pegs that made you feel like you would slip off standing up and the cramped peg location in relation to the seat and the bars. I mean it is cramped for me at 5' 8" 29 inch inseam. Where my last bike became far more fun in the woods the DR felt... a bit much to handle. The stock tires earned their reputation of the name of deathwings being far less capable than the GP22's that came stock on the 250L, yes I missed the GP22's. The rear suspension was thankfully significantly better and only required some dampening adjustment. The front suspension comparatively to the 250L was far far far worse. If you were to mix the rear stock suspension of the 250L with the front of the 650 you would have created the most poorly suspended bike conceived by man. After going from my Racetech setup on the 250L back to whatever Suzuki calls suspension I felt a bit cheated. Now here came the real test was a 329 mile back roads ride from Austin to DFW and back. (my preferred motorcycle proving ground) The average speed limit was still 75 posted and same as last time I was glad I invested in my seat concepts low seat. The bike easily plodded along at 70 - 90 mph with little complaint or trouble minus a bit of excess arm pump and vibration in my right hand. In strong cross winds the DR650 was a bit better planted but the front end due I guess to its horrifically poorly designed nature introduced more wobble than the 250L and with tucking down in wind made the ride a bit harrowing. This go around I was shy on cash and spent my first $270 on bars, grips, seat, and peg lowering kit from JNS engineering. (I also sprung for a 16T front sprocket to mitigate vibration at high speed) I could not repeat could not have made any trip over 50 miles on the stock garbage seat without reconstructive surgery on my rear. The massive upside to this bike is the ease of work on it. A valve job for instance is 4 tools and about 3 hours of work and the best part is no shims just an old fashioned tappet adjuster. The other real test was arriving at my old stomping grounds in Decatur TX at rocky ridge. This is where the 650 showed me all of it's additional weight feeling nearly unwieldy with the exception of its lower reach to the ground. My lap times which were 28 minutes modded 32 ish minutes stock on the 250L climbed up to 36 minutes on the 650 with the mixture of nearly unusable front suspension and god awful tires. At the minimum before another dirt trip this bike will have new tires and front springs. Stock for stock on the Street/ Highway the DR650 substantially outperforms the 250L but in the dirt the 250L is a good bit better for the job. As far as modding goes however I think I can achieve near if not better performance from the 650 with less money. Right off the bat for instance front and rear suspension will run about 600 to 700 less than a Racetech setup for the 250L so time will tell if this review flips. I had about $2400 into the 250L and as of this week about $307 into the 650, even if I go all out with suspension, pipe, and pumper carb I would only be out $1300. Food for thought.
  12. etyrnal

    Suzuki DR-Z400SM (2006)

    0 comments

    Love this machine!
  13. michaelg131

    Honda CRF250L (2015)

    0 comments

    Having not hit the trails or an enduro for the better part of 14 years I decided to pull the trigger on a 2015 CRF250L, I almost purchased the WR250 but the price and my credit kind of pushed it out of the running, not to mention that I tend to be a bit short 5' 8" and the WR felt like I was climbing a minor mountian. To preface the last time I rode 2 strokes were legal, and a fuel injected bike didn't exist. At any rate having recently gotten my 93 DR350 running but lacking a title to go street legal I opted for the CRF. Out of the shop I noticed that it was for lack of a better term kinda nutless. Here in Texas many of the backroads are 75 mph so it is somewhat harrowing to push the bike that hard. <br /><br /> <br /><br />I rode on it untouched for a month, I did like my commute gas bill going from $44 a week in my truck to $5.44 every 2 weeks on the Honda. Where the bike was a pure joy to ride was the woods. No you won't be climbing mountians on it but it is so nimble in the woods vs the old DR. The suspension and stock tires are a bit hard to deal with but honestly who in their right mind buys a dual purpose with the intent of nailing doubles at the local MX track. I have kind of gotten a bit out of shape and still the stock suspension suits my needs. To be honest I like how it dives a bit in the turns. The real test was a 329 mile back roads ride from Austin to DFW and back. The average speed limit was 75 posted I was having trouble holding 70 and about 100 miles in thanked god I changed the seat. In strong cross winds the higher center of gravity is a bit harder to deal with. I also noticed it seems to run a bit hot especially on your left knee as the fan kicks on. I was a bit afraid of overheating but Captian Slow plodded along. (yeah I named the bike after James May on top gear UK) If you are shy on cash and you have $300 to pick any mods I would stress the 13t sprocket, seat, and handgrips. You will thank yourself so will your rear and hands. After it's paid off I plan to go full on modding.<br /><br /> <br /><br />I finally dropped a bit of money into it (not the warranty voiding variety)<br /><br />I went to a 13T front sprocket (made all of the gears useable with the 14T i considered 4th gear an option and nigh useless)<br /><br />got a seat concepts low profile seat (yeah I am short 5'8" and 210 lbs...)<br /><br />Tusk Fat bar with adapter<br /><br />Holeshot pad for a gps / smart phone<br /><br />Tusk hand guards<br /><br />Protaper Pillow grips<br /><br /> <br /><br />This notched the comfort level up a good bit, I wanted new suspension and the FMF but I like my warranty and after a full bottom and top end rebuild on the DR I don't feel like turning a wrench on my commuter.<br /><br /> <br /><br />Pros:<br /><br />It is cheaper than the competition.<br /><br />5 year warranty for $400, yeah that is nice.<br /><br />Gas mileage is not the 73 it claims it is closer to about 56 - 60 but still...<br /><br />The Service intervals, it is a cheap ride if you take care of it.<br /><br />It is a good bike if you trend shorter<br /><br />Nimble in the woods<br /><br />It runs well on 87 octane actually mine seems to prefer 87...<br /><br />Brakes are pretty darn good.<br /><br />I have to say it but it is a good looking machine stock.<br /><br />The clutch has a 1 finger pull, easiest I have ever had.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> <br /><br />Cons:<br /><br />It's power is underwhealming even vs a 22 year old air cooled 4 stroke.<br /><br />The stock seat is like having a 2x4 wedged up your crack<br /><br />The stock bars and grips transfer excessive vibration and cause a good deal of arm pump.<br /><br />The stock 14t front sproket makes the bike run a bit jerky especially in lower gears.<br /><br />Since it has a fuel pump and fuel injector I fear running gas out on it will end up torching the fuel system.<br /><br />The low fuel indicator comes on at half a gallon left and is very touchy with slopes.<br /><br />I think the idle is set too low from the factory and it likes to stall.<br /><br />The clutch feels like it does not fully engage ever.<br /><br /> <br /><br />Conclusion:<br /><br />If I could go back in time and pick a different bike as a dual sport I would petition Honda to make a 450L, none of the other offerings are in my price range or near as a complete package as a 250L. The WR is nicer off the floor but for the price the performance isn't a lot better (got to try a friends) The Suzuki was almost my choice but it had a bulkiness to it I didn't quite like and was too tall. Anything 650? No thanks. I would still walk off the showroom floor with the same 250L. Update: Stage 1 mods, very fun I can now accelerate in a headwind. Decided to go back to stock gearing since it is my commuter and the stage one gave it some balls. Saving up for a racetech or YSS rear Racetech front suspension rebuild. If the tax return is big enough this year maybe I can pay it off and 305 it as well. Man I don't think I could like this bike more except I got to try a road legal 2015 WR450L that well makes me kind of wander, then again even with all the mods the CRF250L still comes out $700 cheaper also the seat height on the WR would make me have to carry phone books in my riding pack.
  14. mebgardner

    KTM 690 Enduro R (2017)

    0 comments

    I've added over $4k of modifications to this cycle shortly after purchasing it. I'm intending this cycle to be a dual sport in purpose, and a USA BDR rider in particular. So, it will see freeway roads and speeds in excess of 75 MPH with hours of seat time slabbing it. It will also see sketchy two track and possible some single track, mud and for sure, some deep sand. So, *lots* of different conditions will be in view during the build, and as you consider the mods I make, please keep in mind my purpose for this cycle. Everything is a trade off, a compromise. Including cost. For instance, I did not / will not add a Rally tower or Rally type lighting. It's just too darned expensive for my purpose. But, I *am* big on protecting the cycle from hits and drops. So, I build out a layered approach to protection, with an eye on weight since I'll have to pick it up when I drop it. I'm also big on protecting *me* in these various environments. I can do something about the (my) body protection with various clothing armor pieces. I try to be seen, too. So, I'm big on lighting up the front, back and sides because drivers need to see me as best as I can make that happen. Sure, BDR riding does not need all that lighting. But, getting there and connecting the trail bits via roads *does* need it. So, it's on there. I referenced a lot of other folk's builds, picking out the pieces that I thought would be beneficial without adding too much weight, cost, or just too "blingy" for my taste. Kudos to Rocky Mountain ATV.com, and ADVPulse.com for their build descriptions. I also bought from KTM Twins.com, but I'm not very happy with that experience (returns take forever, and they dinged me for a lot of cash, for doing it). Probably not buying from them, if I can help it, anymore. Have a look...
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