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Found 230 results

  1. KeystoneSM

    Brake Bleeding

    Got hit by a guy in September. Part of the damage was the front brake line broke. Bought a new HEL steel braided brake line and am not getting shit for feedback. I have bled from, both master cylinder and caliper banjo bolts. The bleeder valve. I zip tied the brake lever for 24hrs. I even went and bought a mighty vac. Still not getting any significant pressure build up. Any tips, what am I doing wrong? Pump 5-15x. Hold. Crack bleeder. with mighty vac Build van pressure to 15psi, crack bleeder. Refil resivoir. Repeat pumping. Going insane.
  2. Shane Watts

    How to Bleed Brakes - Video Tutorial

    find more tips by Shane About Shane
  3. Romy

    Honda XR400R (1999)

    0 comments

    Over the years I’ve owned a few dual sports, street legal from the factory: XT, DRZ, CRF-L. Each one was lacking in one way or another. Heavy, underpowered and burdened with emissions crap. I always found myself modding the crap out of them to confidently take on aggressive woods / atv trails. Basically, I had a $3-4000 machine which I had to dump a bunch more $$$ into to get the performance I wanted. So, I picked up this ‘99 XR400 for cheap money. For $1400 bucks, it needed tires, a chain and a carb cleaning. Bone stock mechanically, it already had more power than any of my previous DP’s (so there’s untapped potential). It came already set up with a BajaDesigns light kit, proTaper bars, Acerbis bark busters and an IMS 4.0 gallon tank. I tuned it up, added a Doubletake Mirror, RAM mounts for my GPS/Phone and I’m riding it a bunch and enjoying it very much!
  4. Carman

    Husqvarna TE 300 (2017)

    0 comments

    Awesome bike. very nimble and zero vibration. awesome woods bike. street plated. awesome in the woods and single track
  5. ThumperTalk

    Scar Racing Brake Clevis

    1 review

    Eliminate the play in the OEM brake pedal Rigid and lightweight design Provides better control of the rear brake
  6. ThumperTalk

    EBC Oversized Brake Rotor Kit

    4 reviews

    Supercross Contour discs not only provide a trick looking brake set up, but also deliver great and improved brake feel over conventional solid discs. Made from heat treated carbon steel with higher friction and more stopping power than stainless steel. Luster finish gold anodized to prevent corrosion. Extra weight reduction reducing unsprung weight. Stylish contoured profile.
  7. ThumperTalk

    Braking STX Brake Rotor

    1 review

    Floating rotors with a stainless steel external braking track and aluminum carrier for more braking power due to the high % of carbon in the steel and the high friction coefficient that it results in Best resistance to heat: the floating design allows for the outer disk, where the heat is generated, to expand and contract instead of warping The STX disks characteristics result in a lighter, better performing and great looking brake rotor Sold Individually Polished Finish
  8. ThumperTalk

    Braking CM46 Sintered Brake Pad

    2 reviews

    Sintered metal pad for motocross, off-road, and ATV racing Provides powerful bite using less force/pull on the brake lever Works great in all racing conditions and temperature and offers a consistent brake pad performance throughout the entire race
  9. N8ster

    Yamaha YZ250X (2016)

    0 comments

    This bike works great! I purchased it in March 2016. It will be used for off-road racing and general play riding. Power comes on hard, right off the idle. Suspension is valved pretty close to where I would like it. Only a few clicks on the forks to make it work. The wide ratio transmission compliments the package well. I thought I would remove the kick stand but it works well and stays in place.
  10. Michael499

    Kawasaki KX250F (2014)

    0 comments

    Solid platform to work with. . Carter and Gary Bailey worked on final suspension settings, which are TCD's handy work. The C4MX modified race motor arrived and is ready for installation. New black plastics await the graphics. The Yosh pipe is on. Rental bars cut to 31.5" are on. Sharp footpegs too. The Braking oversized rotor. Graphics are on their way. Here the initial start up of the C4MX motor at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dJF-VuBRauw
  11. lugnutt480

    Yamaha YZ450F (2006)

    0 comments

    Power,Speed,Grace and BEAUTY;)And she never talks back....or complains.......if only 2300.00 bucks could get a woman that great it would be a much happier world indeed :)
  12. Snifflytooth

    Brake line fittings

    I'm just about to order some HEL brakelines. They don't do a kit for the L, so I have a choice of sending the originals or they have a page on their website where you can specify what you want. So my question to the power of TT is.. What are the thread sizes in the master cylinder and caliper? Am I right in thinking that the length is 500mm to get rid of 'the loop' many thanks in advance ride safe
  13. I just installed the OE front brake micro-switch on my 2014 XC-W. It's stock switch on the EXC and all of the front brake perch part numbers are common between the XC-W and EXC. As you can see in the picture, the brake lever comes nowhere near engaging the switch. Even with the lever adjusted fully away from the bar (which would be too far for me to reach comfortably), there is still air between the lever and the switch. Obviously, applying the front brake pulls the lever further from the switch. I know I can use a hydraulic banjo switch but I already bought this OE switch and I wonder if there's an adjustment I'm over looking? The picture below is the brake lever at rest. TIA.
  14. Guest

    Brake Line Installation!

    I wrote this when I was a member of another board. My guide was written for sportbikes, but it all applies. I'll submit this for consideration as a 'sticky' if the board admin wants to use it. -- Replacing and/or bleeding brake lines. Nothing short of pulling a bank of carburetors causes the average sportbiker more distress. I for one believe braided lines are one of the best bang-for-the-buck mods you can do for your motorcycle. Maybe the very best mod a guy can do for a around a hundred bucks. You get better braking feel and increased stopping power because the lines don't expand under pressure like the cheap rubber OEM ones do. And trust me on this, doing the work is not nearly the black art you might think it is. Now that you've decided to make the leap, go ahead and buy your line kits from wherever you like. There are some great site sponsor e-vendors right here on Thumpertalk who can help you out, I'm sure. You can get your fluid and Speedbleeders from them too (I highly recommend the latter purchase - you'll need three and they're ten bucks apiece, well worth the cash). As for the whole debate on what brake fluid to use, guys get excited about synthetic DOT 5.1; the selling point on this stuff is that it resists boiling better than DOT 4 and is less "hygroscopic" too - which means it tends to absorb less moisture over time than DOT 4. However, unless you're talking about a dedicated track bike, I don't see the value. It's typically more costly than plain-jane DOT 4 and cannot be mixed with anything else if you're low on fluid and in a pinch. Fresh DOT 4, changed out once a year in the spring, will serve you just fine and will cost you less. Thus, I suggest you simply order a bottle of Galfer Super DOT 4 (or any other name brand) when you order your lines and Speedbleeders from the vendor of your choice. I would also recommend the purchase of a basic Mityvac Brake Bleeding Kit, the cheap plastic one that sells lots of places for $25 or $30. (For some reason, CycleBrakes.com is about $15 higher than they should be on this tool.) Don't get intimidated by the relatively lengthy instruction manual that comes with the Mityvac. In fact, you just as well toss it in the trash. This tool is a simple vacuum pump, nothing tricky about it. Affix the clear vinyl tubing to the pump with the inline capture cup attached and you're ready to go. Let's start with the front brake lines, shall we? Put your bike on front and rear work stands, or a rear stand at least. You want it level and sitting on a solid, stable platform. Remove your windscreen and set it aside. It's easier to work on the front of the bike w/o the screen on, and this way you avoid mucking it up with a spilled drip of brake fluid (more on that later). Put some old towels on top of your instrument cluster, fairing, and fuel tank too. You should have some plastic clip-type fasteners which hold the factory lines to the back of the fender. Remove those so the midsection of the lines are free. The first thing you'll use the pump for is sucking out the bulk fluid from the reservoir cup. Unscrew and remove the plastic cover, insert the free end of the vinyl tubing, and pump to your heart's content. Easy as pie. Next you'll want to drape some more towels on the bottom half of your front wheel because you will still have fluid in the line, and when you unbolt it from the caliper, it's going to dribble some. (Note: at the risk of insult, the hex-head fasteners which attach the lines to the master cylinder and calipers are called banjo bolts, so that's what I'll refer to them as from here on out.) Just have a jar or bottle handy so you can put the leaking free end of the stock rubber line inside to catch the majority of the draining fluid. A word on working with brake fluid: don't flip out if you get a drop on your fork, caliper, wheel or other painted surface. Stay calm, wipe it off with a dry paper towel (more absorbent than a cloth towel) and you'll be fine. You might want to clean the now dry spot with another paper towel and some Honda Spray Cleaner & Polish (to this day, I love Honda chems!) if you're really worried about it. The point is, people talk about brake fluid as if it's nitroglycerin or something sure to ruin your bike the instant it touches anything painted. Not true. Be careful, wipe up spills, and you'll be fine. Okay, once the majority of the fluid in the line has drained, unbolt the banjo at the master cylinder up top on the right clip-on. Have a paper towel ready to capture any drips from the top of the line. Carefully thread the line down through the fairing and out the bottom of the bike. You'll be tossing it, the OEM banjo bolts, and all used crush washers (new ones come with your Galfer kit). Get the new lines ready. The front kit is a two line affair with a long and a short line. Take a look at the back of the package - it'll tell you where to place the new crush washers, how many to use, etc. (basically at each and every 'joint'). The short line is the right side which will go against the master; the left line rides on top of it. Bolt everything up, make sure the lines aren't binding on anything at full lock, then torque to 12 to 15 ft-lbs. Unscrew and remove the stock bleeder nipples from both the right and left calipers. Again, you may get a drip. Just have a paper towel handy, this is not the end of the world. Replace the stock bleeders with the new Speedbleeders you bought. No need to seal the threads with Teflon tape or wheel bearing grease as the SB's come with thread sealant already applied. Tighten them down with a small wrench, but don't overtighten. Now you're going to attach the Mityvac to the left caliper's SB via the clear vinyl tubing. Set it down and get your bottle of DOT 4. Carefully pour it into the reservoir cup, almost all the way to the top (just leave enough room that it doesn't spill if you jiggle the bike a bit). Unscrew the SB 1/4 to 1/2 a turn. Begin pumping the Mityvac. You'll see fluid begin to disappear from the cup. Now you're beginning to prime the lines. At first you'll be sucking only air and you'll have to stop pumping from time to time so you can stand up and pour more DOT 4 into the cup (you don't want to let it get sucked dry because that means you've drawn air into the system and you'll be starting over). Eventually (it really doesn't take too long), you'll see fresh brake fluid coming out of the SB, through the clear tubing, and into the catch cup attached to the Mityvac. Keep pumping and pouring until you get mostly clean fluid coming through without big gaps of air pockets (small bubbles will remain, but don't fret, we'll take care of them in a few minutes). By now you might want to unscrew the Mity's catch cup and dump the fluid into another container. Snug up the SB on the left side. Go around the bike and prime the right line in the same manner described above. Once you get mostly clean fluid coming through, you've got both front lines primed and you're ready for the final bleed. At this point, you're done with the pump. You can remove it, leaving yourself a length of clear tubing to attach to the SB's and the catch cup at the end. I like to go back to the left side caliper and start the final bleed there because it's the longest line, but I have no scientific reason to support why I do this. I think you could begin on either side and have it work out just fine. Again, you'll want to back out your SB about a 1/4 to 1/2 turn. Attach your tubing and catch cup. Make sure you've got sufficient fluid inside the res. Give the brake lever a full squeeze, slow and firm, all the way to the bar. Then release, keeping an eye on your fluid level to make sure you don't run dry as you go. Repeat above as necessary. You should see movement in the fluid and a gradual reduction in not only the number of bubbles coming out the SB, but also in the size of them as well. If you've done things correctly, you should be pushing virtually unblemished, virgin DOT 4 through the lines and out the SB in very short order, just a number of pulls on the lever. You might need your husband, wife, S.O. or roomie here at the end, because I like to close the SB about mid-stroke on the brake lever just to make sure the line fluid is under pressure when the escape route is sealed off. (You can simply tighten the SB after your last pull of the lever and be okay, however. The internal check-valve is what prevents air getting into the system.) Now go over to the other side of the bike and repeat the final bleed process. Once you're done up front, you pretty much follow the same steps to replace, prime, and bleed the rear line. The final thing I like to do is use a nylon tie to hold back the front brake lever with the bike on its side stand and bars locked to the left. This places the master cylinder as high as you can get it. Take the plastic handle end of a screwdriver and gently rap the calipers, banjo bolts, and lines from top to bottom. By the next morning, any teeny-tiny bubbles which might have evaded your expert bleeding adventures should have, in theory, escaped up and into the res. You're all done! Go inside, shower up, and crack a beer. You've earned it! Note: you can do all this without Speedbleeders and a Mityvac, but the process changes a bit. I'd have to type up another walk-thru if that's the route you go, so I implore you to pony up the extra coin to get the SB's and pump! Ride well, all. Sarge
  15. Stratman_61

    Honda CRF230F (2005)

    0 comments

    Fun play bike in the dirt. Heavy and suspension is very limited but the torquey motor is forgiving and a blast for casual riding. For SuperMoto track days or mini class racing, corner speed is your friend. The rear drum brake is also limited, and will permanently discolor under heavy use because of heat buildup, but mods can be done to help cool the hub. Even with the limitations, the 230 is a lot of fun, and, on a tight trail or kart track, can be surprisingly quick.
  16. Kamikazejr

    Suzuki DR-Z125L (2006)

    0 comments

    great starter bike super low maintenence
  17. ThumperTalk

    SDG Galfer Rear Brake Rotor

    1 review

    Fits all year models
  18. 5 reviews

    SPECIFICATIONS Smoother & Stronger Braking Stainless Steel Fittings and Bolts Eliminate That Spongy Feeling Sharper and More Responsive Braking Finest Quality Stainless Steel Braided Hose Lifetime Warranty More Reliable Braking System Superior Abrasion and Corrosion Resistance Race Proven Technology
  19. 0 reviews

    PRODUCT DESCRIPTION Motomaster Flame Series brake disc rotors One thing I like about the Beta is they come stock with good quality aftermarket stuff like the Galfer discs, and as with most genuine Beta parts they are quite cheap too. I put the Galfer discs on the second set of wheels I bought with trials tyres, then scouted around for any other options to the stock Galfer discs. Eventually I settled on a set of Motomaster Flame discs when I realised they were top of the line brake rotors but the same price as the genuine Beta discs. I'm pretty fussy about brake discs as I researched them heavily a few years ago when I was having custom made discs made for motard projects. Just pause to read more... A few years ago I did try a set of cheap Chinese discs but down very steep descents they would start an annoying screeching sound, and on some of the longer descents they would start to fade, pretty unnerving if you've never had this happen before. Obviously our slow technical riding rarely pushes a brake disc very hard but we do have some very long steep descents that can drop about 1000 feet in altitude. I've only ever had the stock Galfer discs on the Beta fade once, but that was enough to swing me over to trying the Motomaster Flame Series. In a nutshell? Motomaster is a Dutch-based company and the discs are made in Holland - which can only be a good thing as I've spent some time in the Netherlands and those guys tend to be obsessive about things like quality control. Since 1997 they've become extremely popular discs for competition and they are now the standard disc in the KTM Hard Parts catalogue. If you are just pottering around on your bike then obviously cheap discs may suit your purposes. But if you usually prefer to use reasonably good discs I'd recommend you compare prices with the Motomaster Flame series, it's usually not big step up in price to a set of discs that won't let you down on those steep long downhill runs. A few other reviews I found... Motocross Action Magazine The hardened stainless steel Flame rotors are laser-cut, CNC-drilled and surface-machined to provide almost perfect flatness. That is the key to solid braking. Once our Flame rotors were broken in (and the pads seated to them), the stopping power was impressive.... This is a night-and-day mod for 2015 Yamahas and Suzukis. Bill Baker, Reno NV I've used moot-master on all my motors for racing and also for street work. Great tuff stuff. Motorcycle News Stopping power, put simply. This saw blade-like rotor is the recommended brand to suit the SBS carbon racing pads in my TZR250 (a similar set-up is used by some World Supersport teams), and between the two parts I can stick my race bike on its nose hard, late and with confidence. Feel is good, it’s light and looks great too. Enduro Illustrated Really liked the quality of construction. Great feeling and power. There was no aggressive initial grab, instead a progressive strong feeling and power which gave us confidence and security.
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