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Found 125 results

  1. Bilbo250

    New chain required

    Hi. Hopefully a very quick Q & A and sorry for the newb question I need a new chain for my 01 CR250r Found a listing for an EK 520SR06 120 link O ring listed as a Motocross chain but website lists it as an On road. Is it ok to use?
  2. Hi guys, last weekend i snapped my chain, it was a bit old but i dont think that was the problem. i did a stoppie then as i landed dropped to clutch for second gear wheelie, looked down and chain was snapped. i hope the gearbox is okay but i will find out later. only the master link was damaged both the clip and single side came off undamaged then the other side with the pins was bent at about 20 degrees from normal. if that makes sense then good if not i already threw it out. so my question is, will a new master link be fine or will i need a whole new chain which i have no money for. its an o-ring chain if that makes a difference Cheers, Dale
  3. notenuffridetime

    Primary Drive RDO O-ring chain

    1 review

    PRODUCT DETAILS Sprocket kits include the following Stock size Primary Drive steel front sprocket Stock size Primary Drive steel rear sprocket Stock size Primary Drive O-Ring chain All front and rear sprockets are manufactured to O.E.M., specs using high grade hardened steel . All match original equipment exactly for perfect fit and size . The RDO O-Ring chain provides outstanding durability and long wear characteristics . Features solid bushings with high quality pin material, o-rings and lubricant. Average tensile strength 7,850 lbs.
  4. Mark Matthews

    Honda CRF250R (2016)

    0 comments

    Love this bike, w/ the added rekluse and slip on fmf. I can tear thru anything in any condition.
  5. ThumperTalk

    Parts Unlimited LM O-Ring Chain

    1 review

    Chain Type: 520 100 Ft Bulk 520 SO Chain
  6. TwoStroker894

    Honda CR250R (2004)

    0 comments

    just did a OEM top end on it at the beginning of the season and it runs great.I plan on having it ported by Eric Gorr for more Low to Mid-Range in February 2014
  7. There are hundreds of glamorous products that catch our eye on today’s motorcycles, however – one of the most overlooked products on your bike is the drive chain. They’re dirty, grungy, ugly and as a result, many riders are uninformed about selecting, installing, and maintaining their chain. Selecting wrong chain, improper installation and neglect can cause an extremely dangerous situation which can result in not only harm to your bike, but your body! This article will help you make the most of your chain investment. SELECTION People say, “I want the best chain you make”. Well, there isn’t just one “Best Chain”. There is however, a chain that is “Best” for your bike and type of riding. When selecting a chain, the rider needs consider several factors: 1. What type of riding will you be doing? 2. What chain did my bike come stock with? 3. Is the chain’s warranty (if offered) applicable for this application? 4. Have I made any modifications to the bike that would increase the torque output? Your local motorcycle dealer can help you answer these questions to determine which chain is suitable for your bike & riding style. Keep in mind that the most important aspect of selecting a chain is to BUY THE RIGHT CHAIN! Make sure the chain you’ve selected has a CC rating at or above the number of CCs for the bike. For example, you wouldn’t want to run a chain rated for a maximum of 300ccs if you’re going to install it on a 525cc bike. Also keep in mind that any bike that came stock with an O-ring style chainshould always be replaced with an O-ring style chain. The factory put an O-ring chain on that bike for a reason and installing a standard or heavy duty chain is downgrading from OE standards and should never be done. Check your owner’s manual for information regarding the type of chain your bike came stock with. FACT! 99% OF ALL BROKEN DRIVE CHAINS CAN BE ATTRIBUTED TO IMPROPER ADJUSTMENT OR APPLICATION. Why do chains break? Incorrect application or length, mis-installation, improper adjustment, mismatched drive components – any of these can create the dynamic force, which can break a chain. Chains are a required yet expensive investment for most motorcycles, so the goal should be to maximize your chain investment by getting the longest wear possible. NOTE - To ensure safe, trouble-free riding, you should always install new sprockets when replacing your drive chain. A sure chain killer that most riders overlook is misaligned sprockets. No matter what brand of chain and sprockets you purchase, if your drive system is misaligned you can count on your chain and sprockets to wear faster and cost you more money. Sprockets can be misaligned either side to side, or the leading edge of a sprocket can be off center, or both problems at once. The best way to align sprockets is to lay a straight edge along the flat planes of both sprockets and make sure they touch all the way along. Misaligned sprockets are also one of the primary causes of tight spots. All of RK’s literature states that RK Chains should be installed by a trained mechanic using the proper chain installation tools. Adjustments to the chain should be per the owner’s manual. Most connecting links (AKA master links), including RK use the press-fit design. This means that the connecting link side plate must be squarely pressed over the link pins, with the link pin heads peened over to hold the side plate on (AKA endless chain or rivet style master link). This process can RARELY be installed correctly using vise grips and a hammer. Using tools not designed for chain installation can cause links to bind which decreases the chain’s, performance, life and costs you more money. Also, many chains can be purchased with a clip style master link, including RK, should you want to be able to break your chain more quickly. However, even when installing a clip style master link, a chain press to properly install the side plate is still recommended. Many chain companies sell their own chain tools to help mechanics properly install connecting links. RK’s tool (UCT4060) for example, is both a chain cutter and press-fit/rivet tool. These tools allow you to properly install the connecting link components. However, even using the proper chain tools it is possible to install a chain incorrectly by either flaring the pins too much or not enough. Refer to the chain boxes’ instructions for proper connecting link installment. Always follow factory recommendations for chain adjustments. CHAIN MAINTENANCE No matter if you purchase a heavy-duty chain or an O-ring style chain, ALL CHAINS REQUIRE MAINTENANCE! Maintenance is the most vital part of maximizing the life of your chain. The finest chain made will not last if it is improperly maintained. Cleaning and Lubrication The main purpose of lubricating your chain is the keep the metal from rusting and the O-rings from drying out. Street riders should clean their chain and check adjustment every 400 miles (sooner if the chain gets excessively dirty). Dirt Riders should check chain adjustment before every ride, and clean their chain after every trip (sooner if the chain gets excessively dirty). Use a suitable chain cleaner to remove dirt from building up around the link plates and rollers. Do not use contact cleaner, high-pressure hose, steam cleaner or a coarse brush on an O-ring chain. All these can damage the O-rings and/or wash away the internal lubricant. It’s OK to hose off a non O-ring chain, but be sure to use a moisture dispersant (like WD-40) after any chain comes in contact with water. After cleaning, it is important to lube your chain properly. O-ring and non O-ring chains have different lubrication requirements. Non O-Ring Style Chains (Heavy Duty) Most quality chain lubes will work well on RK’s standard and heavy-duty chains. O-Ring Style Chains All RK O-ring style chains are injected at the factory with a lifetime supply of internal lubricant. An O-ring lube must keep the chain from rusting and the O-rings from drying out. Use only O-ring chain lube that is specifically designed for use on O-ring style chains. Non-Aerosol lube will ensure optimal performance and chain life as these products do not contain thinning ingredients needed for aerosol containers. However any quality O-ring chain lube aerosol or non-aerosol can be used to lubricate your chain. IS MY CHAIN STRETCHING? NO. Chains don’t actually stretch. A more correct term is elongate. This happens due to a process called chordal action. Essentially this means the constant back and forth movement of a sideplate around the pins. The softest part of a chain is the pins, and when it happens correctly, that’s where a chain elongates. The sideplates and rollers have a Rockwell hardness of around C30. The pin material is what’s called “Dead Soft”. Wear occurs between the outside diameter of the pin and the inside diameter of the sideplate hole. Small countershaft sprockets cause more chordal action, as smaller sprockets makemore revolutions than larger sprockets. TIME TO REPLACE Besides the obvious signs of long-term wear, rust, “hooked” sprocket teeth and bound links; there is a Mathematical formula you can use that can tell you when you need to replace the chain. A=# of Links (We’ll use120 for an example) B=.625 for 520 type chain C=.03 (A x = Y (Y x C) = Z (Y + Z) = X X= When the chain exceeds this length – Replace the chain. (120 * .625)=75 (75 * .03)=2.25 (75+2.25)=77.25" You should replace the chain when its length exceeds 77.25" in length. There are many other methods of estimating when you should replace your chain. For example – if you’re able to pull the chain off the back sprocket, using a chain wear guide, etc. But this mathematical formula tells you exactly when your chain has reached its life expectancy. If you have any questions regarding the proper selection, installation and maintenance of your chain, we are more than happy to help you. Please contact one of our knowledgeable sales representatives at 760-732-3161 or email us at info@rkexcelamerica.com www.rkexcelamerica.com
  8. digarcia1987

    Which Chain?

    I ride a 50/50 mix of mx tracks and WORCS like course I have set up near my house. The WORCS course is near a riverbed with very course sand but I mostly ride on the dirt. I want a chain with the least amount of rolling resistance but still reliable. I am considering a Sidewinger Ti II chain but I havent found any in depth reviews on the chain. Will the Sidewinder 16,000 tensile strength 520 chain without oring hold up equal or better than a quality oring? IM pretty sure I have narrowed it down to the DID VM Xring or the Sidewinder but cant decide. any other options are welcome.
  9. Stratman_61

    Honda CRF230F (2005)

    0 comments

    Fun play bike in the dirt. Heavy and suspension is very limited but the torquey motor is forgiving and a blast for casual riding. For SuperMoto track days or mini class racing, corner speed is your friend. The rear drum brake is also limited, and will permanently discolor under heavy use because of heat buildup, but mods can be done to help cool the hub. Even with the limitations, the 230 is a lot of fun, and, on a tight trail or kart track, can be surprisingly quick.
  10. hondacrfinct

    Kawasaki KX450F (2010)

    0 comments

    Smoothest, Fastest, Most Powerful Bike i've ever owned. Currently Race J-Day Offroad and New England MX (450B)
  11. 1 review

    GENERAL INFORMATION 112 links Gold O-Ring 520
  12. ThumperTalk

    Moose Racing Racing 520 HPO O-Ring Chain

    2 reviews

    Chain Length: 120 Chain Type: 520 High-quality O-ring chain Extra-high-tensile-strength link plates Rust-resistant nickel-plated side plates Vacuum-injected greased chain Solid bushings Replacement master link available Extra master link included
  13. DigilubeJay

    How to properly adjust your chain

    It seems like with every thread concerning chain tension comes around, you see the same old answers. The majority of suggestions are given because a rider finds that their method seems to work for them. Actually, giving a person the recommendation to use the 3 finger method is quite silly. I mean, we all have different sized appendages, and 3 fingers for one may be 4 fingers for another. Also, when we have a chain tensioned correctly, there is a very fine line..and only about a 1/4 turn of the tension adjuster, to take the chain into way too tight. Providing pictures of your bike and claiming a person should tension it the same is crazy. The tensioning procedure is far to easily hosed up to simply look at someones picture and be able to make anything at all from it. I have studied the proper adjustment of chains and sprockets for years. I find that one of the biggest problems folks have is misinterpreting the manuals suggestions. For an example, the latest Yamaha 450 manual gives a check range of 1.9-2.6 inches from the back of the top chain slider to the bottom of the chain. After doing a check, I find that this measurement range is about right on. But, do you check this while the bike is on the ground, or while the bike is on the stand? And there lies one of the discrepancies I mentioned.... But where do these moto engineers get the proper recommendation for chain tension in the first place? They use standard engineering practice for chain tensioning...and they pass that textbook information along to the owner, taking into account the length of chain on that particular model bike. The engineering practice they use is the very same for each and every bike, but what changes is the numbers due to how long the chain is...or closer yet, to how long the distance between shafts is...which is what actually determines how taught a chain should be. If you were to use the engineering standard to tension your chain properly, you could then go back and check the measurements that the manual gave you. And you would find that they are indeed very close to what you found. But only if you interpreted what the manual was trying to convey to you properly. I see so many folks who will swear that stock OEM chains are nothing but cheap junk and should be shucked immediately. But that is not really fact. Yes, the OEM chain may not be the top shelf quality chain that your moto supply may want to sell you, but it is almost assuredly of a good quality that will last a rider for many rides before it is trash...IF the rider has it adjusted and maintained it properly. An improperly adjusted chain can only live so long..and even the high-dollar choices will be trash fast if they aren't properly mounted. I'd have to say that the biggest mistake I have seen over the years is folks having their chains too tight. When a chain that is too tight lands a jump and compresses the shock, the overly taught chain eats away at the sprocket teeth, the chain itself, wheel bearings, CS seals, and on and on.... SO many times a rider will then swear his stuff is crap, and start looking for harder and more robust equipment that can handle their improper adjustments better. I contend that if you properly adjust your equipment from the get-go, you will find that even the OEM equipment will provide many hours of riding. Your high dollar replacement equipment will also last longer. The Procedure: You first need to put the bike on the stand and remove your shock. Before you do anything, simply take the swing arm through it's motion of travel from top to bottom. This is the point where many are convinced something is amiss right away, as they often find that there is a point in that travel that the chain gets completely tight. Bowstring tight in many instances. This often will open a persons eyes who has thought they were tensioning their chain properly, but were in reality over tightening it. The tight spot will be when the CS, swing arm, and rear shaft are all in perfect alignment. When you have the bike in that position, you want to use a cargo strap around the seat and the rear wheel to hold the swing arm in that tightest position. Once you have the swing arm in the tightest position, you can then adjust the chain tension. The engineering standard for chain tension is to have between 1%-3% of the distance between the front and rear shafts in total up-and-down chain movement when the chain is at it's tightest point. For instance, if we have a bike that is 24" between the CS and rear shaft, the correct tension for the chain will be between .24" and .72" of total up-and-down free play of the chain when at it's tightest position. Knowing this measurement, you can initially adjust the chain to the .24" mark, and retention once you get to the .72" mark. If this is done, the chain will always be within the recommended tension rage, according to engineering standards. Some may find they feel more comfortable staying within the 2%-3% range. Let's assume you want to start out with the 2% mark and retention when you reach 3%. At 2% of total up-and-down free play would be .48" Note that the tension on the illustration shows the chain having .24" of free play when it is pushed down. And as such, it will also be able to move when pulled up by the same .24" This means that you have a total of .48" in total up-and-down free play in the chain. You are tensioned at the 2% mark. Once you have the tension proper, you want to make certain you still have proper alignment if the sprockets. When everything is nice and aligned, and you are satisfied that you have the proper tension on the chain, you want to make certain everything is buttoned up tight, and you can replace the shock. It is best to recheck everyting before you replace the shock, as things can change a bit on you once you have the adjusters and axle bolt tightened. Take the time to check and recheck until you have it spot on when tight. Once the bike is adjusted properly, and back in running condition...THEN you can check to see what that properly tensioned adjustment gives you when the bike is on the ground...or on the stand for that matter. What you want to do at this point is have some sort of reference so you can check the tension without going back through the shock removal procedure again. If you find that the properly tensioned adjustment gives you three fingers under the chain, behind the slider, when the bike is on the ground...then fine. Use that to determine if you are properly tensioned. But don't tell anyone else that is where they should have their adjustment, it simply may not be correct. To take this further, which is what I do whenever I get a new bike, is to first tension the chain at the upper limit of tension or the 3% mark. I then button everything up and check to see what measurement that gives me when the bike is on the stand. I can from then on see with an easy check when my chain reaches a point that it needs to be re-tensioned. I then go through the whole thing again adjusting the tension to the 1-2% mark, and recheck to see what measurement that gives me when the bike is on the stand. I now KNOW what measurement I should have for properly tensioned chain and chain that needs to be re-tensioned, when the bike is on the stand. I never have to go through the painstaking procedure of removing the shock to properly adjust for tension again. Some will actually cut a GO/NO GO block of wood or plastic to use as a gage. And a proper gage block will have the distance of a properly adjusted chain on one side, and a larger measurement on the other side that will tell when the chain has gone further than the 3%. Many folks have gone for years improperly adjusting the tension on their chains. Many simply accept that their equipment wears out fast...and some find excuses for it like, the chain is junk, or their beastly bike simply is too much for the chain and sprockets to handle...but neither is the usually the case. The truth is that their tensioning procedure is placing undue stress on their equipment, and if they would take the time to do things a bit differently, they may well find that stuff starts lasting a lot longer.
  14. Sierra_rider

    Beta 300 RR Race Edition (2015)

    0 comments

    It has a very neutral chassis, turns very well but doesn't give much up in stability. The power is very linear and easy to use. If you wan't a hard-hitting 2 stroke, this isn't your bike. Even with the aggressive map switch and the powervalve adjuster turned in, it much more mellow than my Yz. Although the power may not be exciting, it's perfect for gnarly technical terrain. Stock forks were harsh on square-edge obstacles. The Pressure springs(small spring in the top of the fork) are known to be to stiff for most offroad riding. I had them changed out when the forks were revalved. E-start works flawlessly and starts the bike within a couple seconds when cold. Ergo's feel good to me...at 6'1", I was worried that it would feel to small to me, but that's not the case. The rear brake lever is a little low for most people, but I actually prefer it that way and it's adjustable anyway. Brakes themselves feel good, the front in particular is very strong. I don't feel they give up much to the Brembo's on the Ktm's. 40 hour update: replaced the stock rear tire within 20 hours and did the front at about the 35 hour point. I now have a tubliss front and rear, with a new rim in the front because of bad crash I had. In that crash, I also smashed the pipe, split a radiator hose, twisted both radiators, and popped the preload adjusters out of both forks. Beta fixed the forks free of charge, so no complaints there. Separate from that crash, the stock map switch is busted and I blew the fuse for the e-starter, although it blew in extremely wet conditions. The most likely culprit is the horn, it's a pretty common issue that's easy to fix. Also, the stock plastic is extremely brittle and easy to crack.
  15. BCRider

    Chain cleaning gutter

    For a while now I've been wanting to try this as a way to make the messy chain cleaning chore less messy and less of a chore. What you see is a short section of gutter with two push on end caps that were then sealed with black silicone rubber. The support is a chunk of corrugated plastic cut to shield the tire and wheel and form a hook that allows it to hang from the swingarm cross member. The support is attached with some 3/8 to 1/2 inch Bostich staples driven through the plastics and bent over on the back side. Other attachment options are possible of course. The two pics below are from the first time I used it. The second one is just before I dumped the blue bowl of solvent into the gutter. This is also pretty much near the end of the cleaning. As you can see it really kept the mess down. In use I clean the lower section of the chain run that is exposed with 4 or 5 toothbrush fulls of solvent and roughly blot off what doesn't drip away with a paper towel. Advance to the next segment and repeat. When I come around to the original segment I pour out the dirty stuff and add new stuff to the bowl and repeat. I found that it takes about three times around on a dirty chain to see the cleaning solvent come off with a light grey color on the paper towel. If it's really dirty I'll run around a 4th time. This process used to be pretty messy with cardboard or a plastic bag under the bike to catch all the drippings. As you can see in the second pic the floor hardly has a drop on it despite being pretty much done. It didn't really speed up the actual cleaning but it sure did speed up the prep prior to the cleaning and the time requied to clean up after the chain is clean. The whole deal to clean and lube this chain took maybe 15 to 20 minutes to go from crunchy dirty to darn near spotless. This time included hooking on the gutter, getting all the stuff off the shelf, doing the cleaning and putting it all way and draining the solvent back into a settling jar. I guess that this seems like a lot of trouble to the racers or serious off road riders but for us dual sport types that are on the roads as much as off them this may help out with a messy chore.
  16. 1 review

    Chain Length: 25ft. Chain Type: 520 25 Ft 520 STD Standard Series Bulk Chain
  17. Spud786

    Stock chain

    This is the stock chain on my 2015 http://www.motorcycle-superstore.com/21516/i/did-520-vt2-enduro-racing-chain?SiteID=SLI|Did%20Chain&WT.MC_ID=10010 I found the number on one of the side plates. It says narrower than standard xring I really intended to go with a DID zvm2 on next chain. What are you all finding with the narrow chains, verses the standard xring type, on the ktm?
  18. Melvin Webster

    Wheelies with stock sprocket(s)?

    I'm new to this - and still getting warmed up to the bike. At the same time, I'm starting to get comfortable enough... and have gotten so I can pop the front wheel off the ground with ease in first gear. While I haven't spent much time trying it in second gear, what little I have played in second gear has me feeling that it may not even be doable to get the bike to lift to wheelie height in second gear, and even less so in third. Is this about right? Or is it a matter of more rpm's and a harder/faster release of the clutch? Thoughts?
  19. Got a new chain and sprockets (15/44) fitted to my real E by the dealer When I picked it up I immediately noticed a vibration through the pegs that wasn't there before. Sometimes you notice it more than other times but it is there independent of revs I notice that the chain is vibrating like crazy at highway speeds and when I put it on the stand , in gear and let it run I can see the chain "jump" once every revolution. Taken it back to the dealer twice and he says there is nothing wrong, the chain "jump" is normal. I am pretty sure I am being fed BS....a chain should run smooth right? The only thing that makes sense is a stiff link. Hopefully someone can confirm I am not going nuts?? My first thought is that I should try replacing the master link (which is a clip type)...it does seem stiffer than the other links...any help greatly appreciated!!
  20. 1 review

    Chain Type: 530 Features solid rollers, solid bushings, through-hardened alloy steel pins, and quadstaked riveting Special alloy steel link-plates are shot-peened, with gold-colored outer plates High viscosity grease is vacuum-injected and sealed inside with Super Seal O-rings Pre-stretched and prestressed for improved performance and fewer initial adjustments Race tested and proven on race tracks throughout the world
  21. ThumperTalk

    RK 520 XSO RX-Ring Chain

    3 reviews

    Chain Length: 100ft. Chain Type: 520 Pro X-ring chain lasts five to eight times longer than standard chain Provides two more lubricant pools than conventional O-rings for longer life Lubricated with specially formulated, vacuum-injected U-grease; locked in by tough Nitrile Butadine rubber X rings Polished and shot-peened link plates High tensile strength ensures reliable performance
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