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Found 211 results

  1. T-Doshi9

    Kawasaki KX450F (2008)

    0 comments

    love the smooth power of this bike. lots of upgrades
  2. melburbank

    KTM 400 EXC (2002)

    0 comments

    A little too tall for me but fun
  3. yzS50f

    Yamaha YZ250F (2007)

    0 comments

    Plenty of power, great range, great suspension. Engine design is decent, carb is okay. First Engine blew up, had to get an entirely new used one. New engine/shining not shown in pic.
  4. Lennart89

    Husqvarna WR300 (2009)

    0 comments

    good bike
  5. Im new to this site I look forward to any help , ok so I am the new owner of an 06 rm250, my first 250 2 stroke ever and im 38 I am not new to 2 strokes or 4 strokes but never had a 250 2 stroke and I took it out today and what a ripper this thing is , the bike is very clean it has a rekluse clutch asv break away levers ect ect , so my first question is #1 what spark plugs do you recommend ? #2 the clutch engaged slightly even with the lever pulled in , if I start it with the clutch pulled in it jumps a little but not enough to take off and when stopped same thing not enough to take off but I feel it pulling very slightly . #3 mix oil im using klotz , recommend better ? #4 what ratio right now I mixed 40:1 #can anyone decode the crank case number and vin ? I found and old thread and it showed how to decode the vin for the year thanks very much for all your help . I uploaded a couple pics .and thanks 06 rm250 mods showa rear spring showa forks procircut pipe and can gpi radiators and hoses recluse clutch asv levers v force reeds keihin carb renthal bars
  6. jmickle11

    Kawasaki KX250F (2008)

    0 comments

    Great bike.
  7. gunnar127

    Yamaha YZ125 (2005)

    0 comments

    Fast,nimble,light weight machine.
  8. freeriders98

    Tusk Clutch Kit?

    Any of you tried the Tusk Clutch kits? I'm thinking I need new clutch plates. Getting ready to pull them and measure them today. Tusk is like $50...EBC or others are $100+...I've had good luck with all the other tusk stuff I've used. This is on an 02 KX250.
  9. tcmrider

    Honda CRF450X (2008)

    0 comments

    2008 CRF450X. 3.2 gallon tank, Mohard Racing radiator guards, trip computer, has been street legal
  10. cadman_ks

    KTM 500 EXC (2016)

    0 comments

    Still a great bike! This is my second one. I use mine for both dirt and street riding. It is very much at home on the dirt. Not a great street bike for 500 mile rides, but for getting from point A to point B, it's perfect.
  11. Ctone23

    Suzuki RMZ250 (2015)

    0 comments

    2015 RMZ 250 Updated Review 1 Year ownership. For anyone who read my initial review, you will recall I praised the RMZ 250 for its outstanding handling. I have decided to come back a year later to go over my thoughts of ownership and maintenance. Performance- The bike still runs fantastic and starts up with ease. No major issues whatsoever. My only complaint with the RMZ is the clutch. Despite installing the Rekluse auto clutch, sometimes the bike has a really faint clutch feel. Perhaps replacing the OEM clutch basket may help. In my experience the bike shifts fine despite the faint feel. You essentially just need to trust the bike and be deliberate with your shifts. When the bike gets hot the clutch (for me at least) loses some of the feel when traveling from 2nd gear to 3rd. Maintenance - I've put a good number of hours this year on the bike, and she still runs great. Routine oil changes, air filter cleaning, improved coolant, etc, have gone a long way (in my opinion) of the bike running and performing well on the track.
  12. josh.joshuabryant

    Clutch Actuator Blockage

    I'm in the process of rebuilding a 1979 Honda XL125s and am almost ready to ride. the bike has a non oem exhaust pipe which hangs quite low, so low that the actuator arm is blocked from movement and often jams half engaged. i understand that i may need to replace the pipe or get the pipe bent/modified, but i was wondering if anyone else had encountered this issue, and how they fixed it.
  13. FORCON8541

    Kawasaki KDX200 (2006)

    0 comments

    Awesome Bike to have around. Great in the trails and small MX tracks. Reminds me of mid 90's KX125
  14. chadsta_za

    KTM 250 XCF-W (2014)

    1 comment

    Amazing learner bike for my wife. Smooth power delivery but if you give it horns its not going to hold back. Bit on the heavy side for her but thats a four stroke for you.
  15. Gravesdigger

    Rekluse EXP 3.0

    26 reviews

    PRODUCT DETAILS Rekluse EXP 3.0 was inspired by our award winning and premier Core EXP system and singles out the revolutionary EXP assembly. Rekluse EXP employs the same race-ready technology and EXP assembly of our premier product; the difference is that it fits into your stock clutch components.
  16. ThumperTalk

    How to inspect and maintain your clutch

    Clutch Maintenance and General Information Inspecting Your Clutch Assembly Riding style and proper maintenance are two main factors that affect clutch life. When inspecting your clutch plates and springs, be sure to also inspect all other related clutch components for excessive wear. Components such as the pressure plate, inner hub (clutch boss), cable, and basket may be worn as well. This is a commonly overlooked area when the time comes to replace a clutch. Many people think that when their clutch starts slipping or not shifting properly that it must be the clutch plates or the springs. This is not always the case. If the surface or the pressure plate and/or inner hub are excessively worn, it can change the pre-load on the springs and cause a clutch to slip- even a clutch with brand new plates. If your clutch basket or inner hub is severely grooved it can cause the plates to not release freely and result in poor shifting. Barnett offers billet aluminum clutch baskets for many popular ATV’s and off-road motorcycles. These clutch baskets are unique in that they utilize patented stainless steel inserts on the clutch fingers where the friction plate tabs make contact. These inserts prevent severe grooving of basket fingers and provides smooth, trouble free shifting and a longer clutch basket life. The Barnett baskets are also designed to increase oil flow to the clutch plates which keeps them cooler and extends clutch life. Barnett also offers billet aluminum pressure plates for select off-road models. These pressure plates include a tempered steel surface that Barnett guarantees to never wear out. Clutch Cable An improperly adjusted cable can reduce clutch life and performance as well. Make sure that your clutch cable is adjusted per factory specifications. Keep the cable and all pivot points clean and well lubricated. Oil When it comes to what oil to use in your clutch assembly, it never hurts to stick with the manufacturer recommended oils and viscosities. There are also many good quality full synthetic and synthetic blend oils available today. These oils are perfectly fine to use with Barnett friction materials. We do recommend, however, that you only use ‘motorcycle specific’ oil. Do not use oils designed for use in automobiles. Using oil designed for use in autos may reduce the life of your clutch and/or result in poor performance. The main purpose of the oil in the clutch assembly is to cool the plates. Therefore, the best thing for your motor and your clutch is to keep the oil clean. Changing the oil regularly is cheap insurance! Inspecting your clutch plates and springs When it comes to inspecting/replacing your clutch or any other components on your motorcycle or ATV, the best tool you can have is a factory service manual. The manual will provide you with all the specifications you need and show proper installation of all components. If you do not have access to a service manual, remember to take note of how all components come out and make sure that you re-install the components in the same order. Overall Clutch Plate Stack Height One of the most important factors in the clutch assembly is the clutch plate stack height. The stack height is the measurement of all friction plates and metal plates stacked together. The clutch stack height for new plates can vary slightly, but not to any great extent. In most factory service manuals, there is a minimum overall clutch stack height specified. Again, this varies from model to model. If your clutch is worn to the minimum stack height, it is definitely time to replace your clutch. It is also important to make sure that when you install a new clutch pack, it is the correct stack height required by the manufacturer. If the stack height is too thin, it can cause slippage and lead to premature wear. If the stack height is too thick, it can cause the clutch to drag resulting in poor shifting. Friction Plates First of all, friction plates are consumable items that are meant to wear and consequently need to be replaced from time to time. The friction plates are designed to be a specific overall thickness. This thickness varies from model to model. Each manufacturer lists a minimum wear thickness for the friction plates. This number can be found in the factory service manual. This is one way to check the condition of your friction plates. However, this method is not foolproof. Often times, the friction plates may be above the minimum wear spec, but still not perform properly. The friction material, through the numerous heat cycles and abuse, can lose its friction capabilities and need to be replaced. The material can harden and glaze resulting in clutch slippage or clutch chatter. Again, if your clutch starts to slip or not shift properly, it could be the friction plates as well as other components (as stated above). Barnett offers high performance friction plates and complete plate/spring kits for all popular motorcycles and ATV’s. Metal Drive Plates The metal drive plates in the clutch assembly do not always wear at the same rate as the friction plates. As with the friction plates, each model requires a specific thickness for each metal plate. Some models require more than one thickness of metal plates in the clutch pack. When inspecting the metal plates, check to make sure that they are flat and not discolored from heat. If they are not flat or they are burnt from excessive heat, replace them. You can find the manufacturer maximum warpage spec listed in the service manual. Sometimes, the metal plates can be re-used as long as they are still the correct thickness and still flat. We recommend replacing the metal plates when you replace your friction plates. If you do decide to re-use your metal plates, you can bead blast them or lightly scuff them with a Scotch Brite pad or fine emery paper. While, most models come with the metal plates made from steel, some models come with aluminum plates. The aluminum plates have a tendency to wear quickly, polish to a high sheen, and contaminate the oil. Replacing them with Barnett steel plates will help keep the oil cleaner, increase flywheel effect, and last much longer. Barnett also offers “Cryodized” aluminum drive plates for the serious racer. These plates are cryogenically treated and hard anodized for added strength and they do not contaminate the oil like plain aluminum plates. The “Cryo” plates are available for select models and recommend for racing applications only. Springs Another essential component for proper clutch operation is the clutch springs. Weak or fatigued springs are a prime cause of clutch slippage and premature wear. Again, similar to the clutch plates, each manufacturer has a minimum free length spec for the springs in each model. Refer to the factory service manual for the proper length required in your model. Barnett clutch springs are made of chrome silicon and are heat treated, shot-peened, and pre-set to remove initial sag. Barnett clutch springs are generally 15-25% stiffer than OEM springs. If you choose to use heavy duty clutch springs and you feel the lever pull is a little stiff for your liking, you can alternate them with standard springs if your motorcycle or ATV has an even number of springs (4 or 6). Remember that you must alternate them for even pressure on the clutch assembly. Often times you can install stiffer heavy duty springs to aid a slipping clutch. However, this should only be done as an emergency fix to get you through the day or through the next moto. This is only a temporary fix and the clutch assembly should be inspected right away and any worn components should be replaced.
  17. bobkoch

    Yamaha YZ250 (2005)

    0 comments

    Love my YZ250. Set up for desert with wr transmission.
  18. nearma12

    Rekluse 2.0 or 3.0?

    I'm in the market for a Rekluse EXP for my 07 KX450f. Is there a 2.0 and a 3.0? Everywhere I look, the listing is vague. Even from Rekluse website, the listing doesn't specify 2.0 or 3.0. I've seen EXP Core listed as 3.0, but not the EXP disc alone. Anyone know? I would prefer to buy the 3.0 if I can, but I'm not sure how to tell. Thanks!
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