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Found 43 results

  1. I live here in Iowa so the winters can get down to -25 or so and the summer heat can sometimes get to 115 degrees. What Anti-freeze would you recomend to put in my bike? Do any of you use Engine Ice? Im thinking about buying a jug. I also just bought this bike so im not sure what anit-freeze he has in it.
  2. WhatUsernameShouldIChoose

    How to stop overheating

    My bike likes to overheat when I'm going very slow, I'm sure it's not uncommon. When I'm in the trails and going faster, it's fine. Sometimes I just like to putt around my small set of trails I have at my house, and I don't get out of first gear. About an hour and a half later, my bike overheats and starts peeing coolant. Any way I can stop this? Or at least make it more resistant? And I can't go faster in my set of trails, there are 90 degree turns every 5 feet.
  3. I have a rad guard on the left hand side but it has dawned on me that not much is protecting the coolant reservoir. Is there some line of protective bracket a available?
  4. nvrider

    KTM 250 XC-F (2011)

    0 comments

    love this bike! I use it for the track and off road. perfect for me at my current speed.
  5. Alright so i tried poking around to find a thread on this but couldnt find one.... Swear I saw one before or you'd think there would be. So the Coolant "Engine Ice"...The guy I bought my bike from had it in, and my brother just bought one who also had it in. It claims to be some good stuff... BUT i hear whole lots of horror stories about it, about how it has less lubricant in it and its really bad for your water pump, and that it heats up much faster when you're stationary. So I drained it, ran two loads of standard 50/50 prestone in it to wash out all the old crap, and use prestone 50/50 currently. what scares me is a little dripped on my driveway, and where it streamed down the cement it left these really hard black clump deposits here and there on the cement. sometimes see little black flakes floating around the radiator. IDK if its dirt or corrosion. So my question would be, For anyone with Engine ice experience, What do you think of it? And might I have a little Radiator issue or is this normal or should I flush it? Thanks a ton guys! NOTE: I already know the prestone is fine. Ran it in my last bikes and for all summer in this one. Bike is a 2008 YZ250F What coolant should I use if neither of these? Want my bike as cool & safe as possible
  6. Howxitxisx

    Engine ice?

    Does it help I am using antifreeze right now and my bike gets real hot in the tight stuff will engine ice help how about if I mix it with water?
  7. dirtman48

    Coolant coming out of bleed hole

    I just rebuilt my water pump and engine this winter. I ran 50/50 water and vinegar through the engine to flush coolant out. After doing this once I added new engine ice to the radiator. After ride for about 5 min I noticed coolant coming out of the bleed hole. all of the coolant went out of the bleed hole.
  8. Fast question. How and where do I check if I have the right coolant level?
  9. More than you wanted to know about Liquid Engine Cooling Liquid cooling is an often overlooked part of an engine's operation. If it's not overheating then everything's good. The problem is that, when trouble does develop, the answers can be elusive. I'll come right out front by saying that I work at Evans Cooling Systems, Inc. and stand behind the properties of our waterless coolant. I'll tell you about it at the end, but first I'm going to cover some things that you should know if you choose to use a water-based anti-freeze. If you're sick of overheating, you can just skip ahead. Physics Pressure: A higher pressure will raise the boiling point of a liquid. A lower pressure will lower the boiling point. Water runs down hill. For us, it's more important to recognize that vapor wants to go up. This is why cooling systems (almost) always flow out of the bottom of the radiator, down to the pump and into the bottom of the engine. Vent lines are placed so that vapor can escape (from the pump, head, or elsewhere) and go up into the radiator. This direction of coolant flow naturally carries vapor up and out of the engine. Overheating happens when the coolant temperature reaches its failure (boiling) point. Sometimes it is said that when coolant starts spitting out, it's your warning that things are getting too hot. It's not a warning of a failure; it is the failure. Vapor shielding: As the anti-freeze begins to boil inside the cooling jacket, it forms vapor. Soon the vapor increases from a few bubbles to being a layer along the metal surface. This layer prevents liquid from contacting the metal and the metal is effectively insulated; it is no longer “liquid cooled.” The metal temperature spikes and hot spot detonation, seizure, and other engine damage are the result. Head gasket failure is due to head warping which is the result of uneven temperatures across the head. System Layout There are from 6 to 9 basic components depending on the particular layout of the cooling system: radiator(s), cap, overflow tank, hoses, hose clamps, thermostat, cooling jacket (inside engine), pump, and fan. Dirt bikes will lack some of these parts and complex street bikes can have more. Avoid Boiling the Coolant The goal of the system is to cool the engine, but that statement is too simple. The goal is to keep the metal temperatures under control and this can only happen if the liquid is in contact with the metal and carries the heat away. It is often recognized that a greater amount of heat is removed through the action of boiling, but this is only true until the bubbles formed grow big and displace the liquid coolant. If the metal is in contact with vapor, not liquid, the metal temperature cannot be controlled. Boiling coolant is to be avoided. There are two sides to improving the efficiency of your cooling system. One is maintenance and the other the choice of components. Maintenance Keep the outside surfaces of the radiator clean. Spray water through the fins from the back to clean out mud and grass. I never use a pressure washer on my bikes. Some teams put a mesh across the front of the radiators in muddy conditions. If the fins get bent, you can spend some time to straighten them out. Every little bit helps improve efficiency. Check the hoses. Obviously you are looking for cracks or bulges so they can be replaced before a failure. Keep in mind that an older hose can leak through the threads. The hose may look fine, but the coolant can get through the inside layer of rubber and then follow the threads out. Leaks don't always drip to the ground; look for a crusty streak, sometimes at the pump. Change your anti-freeze every year. After time, the corrosion inhibiting additives fall out of solution and settle out of the coolant; this is the sludge that collects at low points in the system. When this happens, the anti-freeze will continue to cool the engine as it did before, but there is much less corrosion protection. If left like this for too long, the corrosion that forms will insulate the metal surfaces from the coolant and this WILL decrease the cooling efficiency. This is why they suggest using a vinegar rinse to clean the system out. Diagnosing an overheating engine Radiator cap: Does the gasket seal? Any rips in it or dirt under it?Is the small disc on the underside free to move? This disc is the return valve that lets coolant back into the radiator from the overflow tank when the engine cools. If the cap doesn't pressurize the system because it doesn't seal, the boiling point of the coolant will be lowered and overheating is the result. A leak elsewhere in the system can also cause a loss of pressure; at operating temperature, you should feel the pressure if you squeeze a hose. Thermostat: If it is stuck open, it may be hard to warm the engine up on a cold day.If it is stuck closed, the engine will run hot or overheat. You can test it by putting it in water and seeing if/when it opens as you heat it up. Thermostats have different temperature ratings. If it's a “190 thermostat” it should be open at 190F. Racers often remove the thermostat entirely to increase the flow rate of the coolant. Do not remove a bypass type thermostat unless you constrict or block the bypass line. There is a myth out there that if you remove the thermostat, the coolant will flow too quickly to shed the heat through the radiator. The radiator can dissipate heat just fine; in fact, it becomes more efficient with a greater liquid/air temperature difference. The myth originates from a real effect which is based on pressure. The thermostat (or restrictor that may be installed in its place) raises the pressure on the coolant in the engine as the pump pushes against it. This higher pressure raises the boiling point of the coolant inside the engine. Pump: Obviously, if the pump doesn't pump, you'll overheat. These days pump impellers are likely to be plastic. We've seen manufacturing problems where the impellers separate from the shaft; you could look at this impeller and not see that it's broken, but it would come off in your hand. We've also seen the blades snap off due to cavitation. Cavitation happens when a coolant is close to its boiling point. The “draw” side of the pump naturally has a lower pressure, and this can cause the fluid to vaporize. As the blades smack against this mix of vapor and liquid, they can wear or break. The pump is not designed to pump vapor so this cavitation also slows the coolant flow which will cause the temperature to rise. If the additives in the anti-freeze have fallen out of solution or you've been using straight water without a pump lube, the pump seal can fail leading to a bearing failure. Engine oil that looks creamy is telling you that there's water in it. If it's reddish brown like peanut butter, it's rusty water. Jetting: A lean fuel/air ratio will cause an engine to run hotter. An aftermarket pipe without proper jetting/fuel injection tuning will flow more air making the engine run leaner. A clogged jet can do the same. Changing things like cams, spark advance, and compression ratio can make an engine run hotter. Ethanol in the fuel will burn leaner. Look for a possible air leak in the boot between the carburetor and head. Altitude: It's not just that the air is less dense at altitude, but the lowered ambient pressure also has an effect. The radiator cap will pressurize the system to, say, 13 psi *over the atmospheric pressure*. A lower atmospheric pressure will lower the internal system pressure. You or your friends: If you are riding slowly, there is less airflow to the radiator. If you get stuck or are waiting at a bottleneck, that problem is worse. Air Pocket: Air trapped in the system can interrupt coolant flow and cause overheating. Optimizing the System: Hoses: Silicone hoses are better quality in general and resist heat stress and age cracking. There are silicone hose kits available that eliminate the plastic Y connector. This connector has a smaller inside diameter than the hose, so it restricts the flow; get rid of it if you can. If you go to silicone hoses, spend a little more on the recommended hose clamps so that they don't cut into the silicone. Silicone hoses are more delicate in terms of impacts, so consider a guard in places where a rock may hit it. Radiators: There are a number of aftermarket radiator companies that make upgraded radiators. Generally they are bigger and/or deeper which adds fluid capacity and surface area to the system, both of which help lower coolant temperature. Whatever radiators you use, make sure they're clean inside and out. Radiator cap: A higher pressure rated cap will raise the boiling point of the coolant. Race teams sometimes take this to an extreme; I've seen auto racing teams that have an air valve on the cap so they can pressurize it with an air compressor. The FIA limited the allowed pressure in Formula One for safety reasons. I don't recommend raising the pressure more than just a few psi. Pump: There are some aftermarket pumps available. A better impeller will increase flow and an efficiently designed housing can reduce the flow restriction. Fan: There are fan kits available now for some dirt bikes; increasing air flow to the radiator will decrease the coolant temperature. Making sure the fan is operating correctly is important. There can be failures of the temperature sensor or fan switch. Some people like to install a manual switch so they can override the automatic operation. If there is a shroud around the fan or ducting that the manufacturer installed, make sure it remains as they intended. Anti-Freeze: Any coolant with water in it has the same basic properties because those properties are limited by water's characteristics. Water boils at 212F at atmospheric pressure. The boiling point is raised a little when it's mixed 50/50 with glycol, either ethylene glycol or propylene glycol. The big increase in boiling point comes from pressurizing the system. Tap water is terrible stuff to use, but most of the anti-freeze for sale today is pre-mixed with clean water anyway. Many equipment manufacturers have guidelines on the anti-freeze to use such as “no phosphate or silicate based additives”. These additives can be gritty like sand and are bad for pump seals. Limitations of Water: Water is corrosive. Anti-freeze manufacturers use a number of different additive packages to fight this property, but they all settle out after time allowing the corrosion to occur. Some additives are bad for seals like silicates. Some additives, like the OAT type(organic acid technology) degrade silicone. Water conducts electricity. This electrolysis eats metal. You can buy “sacrificial” metal tablets to put in the system that will “absorb” the damage from electrolysis. Water's boiling point is too close to the operating temperature of the coolant. There is a very narrow safety margin and the anti-freeze will boil in specific locations before the system is observed to be overheating. The area around the exhaust valves is typically quite hot. When the anti-freeze boils here, a vapor layer forms that shields the metal surface from the liquid coolant. The metal temperature then spikes and detonation is the result. The engine will run poorly and lose power as the coolant temperature approaches its failure point. While the system pressure raises the boiling point, it also sets up a situation where a puncture will expel all the coolant. Hot anti-freeze will gush from an opened cap, but not because of the pressure that the cap regulates. When the cap is removed, the pressure drops which drops the boiling point in the system. It is the flash boiling that happens inside the engine that causes the gusher. Evans Waterless Coolant: Like I said at the top, I work at Evans, but I'm not just a paid promoter. I started using Evans waterless coolant while road racing in the 1990's when it was still legal for pavement racing. As I became more familiar with its properties, I put it in all my vehicles and started selling it at the track and online. Things grew to the point that my volume was getting noticed by the company. Years later, and here we are with a formula specifically designed for the powersports industry. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me tell you about the product that I believe should be in every performance machine out there. You wouldn't take the back off your watch and pour water in it; it's time to stop pouring water in your engine! The high boiling point of Evans means that the coolant temperature won't go above its failure point. It operates within the same temperature range as conventional anti-freeze and is able to stay in contact with metal surfaces, even at stressful points like around the exhaust valves. Pump cavitation is avoided, as is electrolysis. All of Evans' coolant formulas are non-corrosive and last the lifetime of the engine. If I'm rebuilding an engine, I will save the coolant and pour it back in the rebuilt engine. Evans Coolant doesn't freeze; we state that it will flow at -40F, but we have not found a freezing point. After lowering a sample to -60F without freezing, we decided to talk about its pour point like the oil industry does. Evans Coolant is a patented blend of chemicals, most of which are commonly found in conventional anti-freeze formulas, and additives with no water. It is not a gel and will not turn gooey if anti-freeze is added to it. If something were to happen on the trail and you are forced to add water or anti-freeze, it will simply perform like conventional anti-freeze, no worse. Information on the web about poor cold weather performance of Evans Coolant refers to our oldest formula. The current formulas are approved for all weather conditions and are mandated by Rotax for use in their 900 series aircraft engines. Evans Coolant has a high boiling point of 375F at atmospheric pressure. While it does not need pressure to raise its boiling point, we do not recommend modifying the system to hold zero pressure. It will expand 7% at operating temperature so you will notice some movement to the expansion tank, but it doesn't build pressure like water does. If you were to open the cap when hot, it shouldn't spurt out. A little might come out, like a tablespoon, but if more does, it is a sign that there is either water present or an air pocket in the system. The added safety margin of the high boiling point will save the engine when conditions become extreme. Through an unintentional error that cut air flow to the radiator, I saw the coolant temperature on my road race bike go to 297F. The bike was still running alright, so we changed the oil and fixed the cause of the problem. The engine ran fine for all the races that weekend and then all the races at the finals at Daytona. Evans Powersports Coolant is trusted by race teams around the world. I encourage you to go to our website www.evanscooling.com to learn more and see the interview with Jay Leno or stop by our Facebook page http://www.facebook....300949013264495 for a more personal interaction. When you hear about our Chinese business, you should know that we make the coolant in Pennsylvania and export it into China. Evans China has installed American made waterless coolant into more than 150,000 new passenger cars so far!
  10. This has been on a thread before but I wanted peoples thoughts on a bike already built with an overflow such as a WR450. I couldn't find much tested data of actual temp changes/improvments at idle or on the move. Has anyone out there done any testing on their own? I see more of a benefit for bikes without an overflow due to fluid loss from puking it out. Thanks, K
  11. sactofisher

    Coolant in motor oil

    Hi All, I 'inherited' a 2004 DR-Z 400 from a friend and decided to change the coolant and oil before taking it out for a ride. When I went to drain the coolant, nothing came out except for a small amount of motor oil (issue #1). I flushed some water through and it came out clean, so I decided to add some new coolant. I put in the recommended amount, and yet I couldn't see anything in the radiator. I then decided to drain the engine oil and out came my missing coolant. I know that if you have a head gasket leak for example, the oil will be milky, but I assume this would be the case after running the bike, which I did not, Are there any thoughts on what could be causing the coolant to mix in with the oil without running the bike?
  12. Hey guys i do a lot of mountain single track and im having a hard time keeping this thing cool,i have oversized radiators, running enige ice??? any body try the boyesen supercooler water pump?? or maybe hook a fan up!!any help would be awsome.....
  13. Hey Guys, I'm fairly new to dirt bikes and since owning my 2012 WR 450 I've had overheating issues. Coolant boiling over and steam/fluid pouring out the discharge tubes. I removed the pea shooter, changed rad fluid to Coolanl. This didn't help at all. 90% of my riding is slow technical mountain trails in the Alberta Rockies. 1. I have a GYTR Competion ECU on order, will changing the mapping help it run cooler? 2. Is putting a FMF Q4 muffler going to help run cooler? 3. Adding fans is becoming a pain in my butt: Would appreciate some pics & details on someone whose done fan setup. 4. What is the best and most economical temperature sensor or computer a guy can install? I need the biggest bang for my buck cooling upgrade, hopefully it also fairly simple for a newbie to do. Thanks in advance. Cheers Russ
  14. Hi, I've recently purchased a 2 stroke 2007 Honda CR 250. The bike has been standing for 6 months. I topped up the coolant till just below the neck and replaced the radiator cap. As soon as I start the bike the coolant pours out of the overflow pipe, if I rev, more seems to empty out. Haven't driven the bike as I'm scared it might lead to bigger issues. Any idea what might be the problem or what I can do before I go a mechanic and pay through my teeth
  15. Bryan Bosch

    Radiator Coolant Basic Maintenance

    There are tons of threads on ThumperTalk about oil changes, but far fewer on radiator fluid. Because of this, I thought that this would be a good topic to cover. At a minimum, radiator fluid should be changed once per year. If you race, at least twice a year. When you do this, it's a good idea to flush the system with white vinegar and distilled water (50/50 ratio). After you've drained the old coolant, fill it up with the vinegar/water solution, run your engine until warm. Drop the solution and fill with clean water to flush the system. Drain the water and fill to the correct level with your favorite coolant. Do not overfill. The acid in the vinegar does a good job of cleaning out the old coolant and contaminants but will not harm engine seals. In terms of coolant, there are lots of choices and you can't go wrong using what your manual recommends. Most coolants are ethylene glycol based, so make sure to dispose of it where your pets (and young kids) aren't exposed to it. Because it's sweet smelling and tasting to them, they'll drink it and if they ingest enough, dead puppy or kitty. I personally use Engine Ice. It's propylene glycol based, making it much less toxic to humans, animals plants, etc... and it's premixed with distilled water, ready to run with freeze protection down to -26 and a boiling point of +256. If you live where winters are cold and you choose not use a premixed coolant/antifreeze, be sure to check the mixture with a hydrometer. You can get them for cheap at just about any auto parts store. You simply suck up some fluid, count how many balls float and cross reference the number of the freeze protection chart. Also, the specific gravity of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol are not the same, so make sure that you use the correct hydrometer. For example, Engine Ice claims freeze protection to -26, but an ethylene glycol specific hydrometer will read only to +20. Not a problem per se in this example (you'd still be well protected), but the other way around could be trouble. I've found that some hydrometers just don't specifically say what coolant they are for. However, most are for the more traditional ethylene glycol. Hopefully this is of value to some and I've always had excellent results following these practices. May winter come late and that you log lots of happy, trouble-free miles.
  16. teddy montana

    Jet kit question

    I have 09 450 exc. I wanna do the jd jet kit and punch the exhaust. Do u need to have a fan kit to do these mods? Or can I do the jet kit without a fan? I'm running engine ice. Thanks
  17. jclark15

    01 rm250 coolant problem

    Hey tt guys I'm new to the forum and also to the world of rm's. I just bought a really clean 01 rm250 and the thing runs like an animal but the one thing I don't understand is the radiators. When I looked in the radiator to see the fluid it was like 1/2 under the top of the veins so I added some till it was at normal level but when I started the bike it puked all the fluid I just put in. And it wasn't after heat built up it was as soon as I started the bike. Don't really know what's going on. Any help is much appreciated
  18. 2grimjim

    Coolant 411

    Just added an Athena 300 kit on my 2016 Yamaha YZ250X, and after draining the stock blue colored coolant, what drained out wasn't nearly enough to refill with the 300 top end. So.... this is what lead to my quest about coolant color coding, types, and compatibility. When I worked as a Yamaha/Suzuki/Polaris service tech, It never really crossed my mind. The coolant that Yamaha and Suzuki were sometimes blue, sometimes pink, and sometimes yellow. Polaris was (is) always looked like the same green stuff sold at auto parts stores. But, the service replacement coolant sold by Yamaha and Suzuki were always Green. When I asked our Yamaha and Suzuki Service Representatives what the difference was between the OEM and the replacement green coolants, the both had the same reply: "Coolant should be replaced every 2 years. If the coolant is low, advise your customers to drain and flush the cooling system and replace the coolant with what you stock on your shelf." Hmmm.... Ok. Still didn't answer my question, but I'll just do what the man says. Turns out there are significant differences between coolant types. Most of the changes have been made in the last 20 years but prior to that, you had one choice. The green stuff. Now, as of today, you have 3 general classes of coolant (excluding running straight water or waterless coolant). They are as follows: Inorganic Acid Technology (IAT) Organic Acid Technology (OAT) Hybrid Organic Acid Technology (HOAT) Inorganic Acid Technology IAT is what we all know as the classic green coolant that has been around for ages. It is a mixture of either Ethylene Glycol (toxic) or Propylene Glycol (non-toxic, the same stuff in your Mio), and corrosion inhibitors containing phosphate and silicate acids. Now, before I go any further, I'm going to clarify what exactly "Silicates" are. Silicates are not the same as Silica. I've read a ton of nonsense about coolants containing Silica and it being used to "scrub the insides" of your engine. This is a bunch of B.S. Coolants have never contained Silica. Silicon is an element (like Oxygen, Nitrogen, and Carbon). In its pure form, it's used to make chips for electronic circuits. Silica is Silicon Oxide (SiO2). It's the mineral Quartz and the largest component of beach sand. Silica is not soluble in water. Silicone is a synthetic rubber that replaces Carbon with Silicon. Silicate(s) are an anionic Silicon compound. Various types of Silicates are water soluble compounds that are acidic, hence their use as a corrosion inhibitor in coolants. There is endless (incorrect) writings about how Japanese manufacturers don't use coolants with Silicates because the Silicates will grind up water pump seals. Nonsense. Japanese manufacturers don't use Silicates because they believe that Silicate compounds are too chemically aggressive and given the right conditions, will cause excessive pitting in the areas of highest heat (near the exhaust ports). Phosphate and Silicate corrosion inhibitors in green coolant are considered 'fast acting'. They provide a nearly instantaneous barrier to the bare metal internal surfaces but are consumed quickly in this process. IAT coolants must be replaced every 2 years. After 2 years, the coolant my still have it's boil-over and freeze protection, but it's ability to prevent corrosion is gone. IAT coolants are NOT sold as 'long life' coolants. In order to be considered 'long life', the coolant needs to have a corrosion inhibitor package good for 5 years. There are 'low Silicate' and 'Silicate free' brands of coolants available the appease the Japanese manufacturers. Just as there are 'Phosphate free' brands for European brands (Zerex G05 is a Phosphate free HOAT coolant). Low Silicate types are usually sold as 'universal coolants' and advertised that they can be mixed with any type coolant (but they reduce the lifespan of any long life coolant to 2 years) Zerex makes an "Asian Formula", coolant that contains Phosphates but no Silicates. It is available in Red and Blue. The formulation is the same for both, there's just a choice of colors for the anal compulsive. Organic Acid Technology OAT coolants started life with GM's Dexcool in 1996. They are usually orange. As fo 2013, both GM and Ford use Dexcool. OAT coolants do not use Silicates, Phosphates, Borates, Nitrates, Nitrites, or any other type of fast acting, agressive corrosion inhibitor. The ingredients are proprietary. The advantage with OAT coolants is they offer protection against corrosion for 5 years. However there is a problem with Dexcool and GM was sued over it. The brilliant engineers at GM did not test the Dexcool additives for compatibility with the Nylon 66 used in for the intake manifold gaskets used in most everything they built. Given the right conditions, the Dexcool would soften the Nylon and create a coolant leak into the intake ports. OAT (Dexcool) coolants should NEVER be used where the manufacturer didn't use it from the factory. GM allegedly changed the specification for Dexcool after they were sued, but the potential still exists for incompatibility with certain elastomers used in gaskets, seals and o-rings. Hybrid Organic Acid Technology HOAT coolants were a response by manufacturers other than GM that wanted the long life coolant but were concerned about protecting against corrosion while using a less aggressive OAT component. The HOAT coolants used by manufacturers used organic acid inhibitors that were less susceptible to attacking plastics and rubbers but were not as effective at providing initial corrosion protection. All HOAT coolants add some inorganic acid compounds to make up the difference. Ford switched to a HOAT specification between 2003 and 2004 model years without any changes to cooling system components, gaskets or seals. Zerex G05 is a HOAT coolant that contains some Silicates. HOAT specifications for most Asian manufacturers will contain Phosphates but not Silicates, HOAT spec for most European manufacturers will have Silicates but no Phosphates. European manufacturers do not like to use Phosphates because of hard water issues in Europe. The Phosphate corrosion inhibitors will react with hard water and cause precipitates (coolant sludge). Many Industrial, commercial, and heavy duty diesel manufacturers specify HOAT with Borates, Molybdates, Nitrates, or Nitrites to combat cylinder liner cavitation pitting. All coolants advertised as 'Long Life' will be either OAT or HOAT formulations. Now, what does all this business mean with my dirt bike? The color, unless it's orange or green, color is pretty meaningless. Japanese no-Silicate coolant can be pink, blue, or red. There are several universal coolants (Prestone makes one) on the market that will work with any coolant type if you are worried about topping off your OEM factory fill. Japanese manufacturers in general specify a coolant type with little or no Silicates. European Manufacturers in general specify a coolant type containing no Phosphates. No European or Japanese manufacturer recommends the use of Dexcool or a straight OAT type coolant. And Honda and Toyota specifically prohibits Dexcool in any of their vehicles. As far as Polaris, and Arctic Cat (I know, not motorcycles), you are probably safe with any green coolant. But knowing how most ATV's and UTV's are used, a universal long life would probably be a better choice. Universal long life coolants are usually a HOAT type. So, how do I know if my coolant corrosion inhibitors are depleted? If you replace your coolant every 2 years, you don't need to worry about it. But, if you must know, there are 2 tests you can do to check if the corrosion inhibitors are still working. The 1st test is to use a voltmeter. Remove the radiator cap, place the ground probe on the frame (or battery ground cable if you have one), and the positive lead inside the radiator immersed in coolant but not touching the radiator, and observe the voltage. It should be less than 0.3V (300mV). I'm not 100% convinced that this test is an accurate indication. My preference is to use wide range pH test strips. Old school coolant can range between 10.5 and 14. Newer long-life coolants will be between 8 and 10.5. In all cases, if the pH is anywhere near 7 (or below), the corrosion inhibitors are dead. What about Redline Water Wetter, Maxima Coolinol and Cool-Aid, Engine Ice, and Evans waterless? A water-only option without any corrosion inhibitors is just plain stupid. Even distilled water will cause corrosion in a short period of time. Hard water will cause corrosion damage very quickly. Even running straight water with a corrosion inhibitor additive (Redline Water Wetter, Maxima Cool-Aid) won't do much in the way of keeping your engine cooler. How cool the engine runs is determined by the heat rejection rate of the radiator as well as the coolant type. Pure water may have a higher capacity to carry heat, but the radiator can only get rid of that extra heat load at a certain rate. That rate is determined by the radiant area, the difference in temperature between the ambient air passing through the radiator and the coolant inside, and how fast the coolant is traveling through the radiator. Running straight water will require the water flow slower through radiator to allow for the extra BTU energy to be rejected, but slowing the rate through the radiator is going to mean the rate will be slower through the engine. And this will raise the temperature of the water even higher. A run away is then in effect. Most stock cooling systems have enough reserve cooling capacity that this isn't a big problem or even noticeable, but it lowers the threshold where boil-over occurs. Waterless coolants have the same heat rejection issue but for a different reason. Pure ethylene glycol doesn't have the heat capacity of water and since the rate of heat transfer is slower to the coolant, the engine temperature raises. And because the waterless coolant rejects less heat to the radiator, it doesn't cool as much. Operating temps 20+ above what most dirt bikes are designed for is going to cause issues with detonation, oil cook-off, seal life, clutch life, and who knows what else. There is one scary aspect of waterless coolant: it doesn't boil until 385 degrees F. You will pretty much destroy your engine if you manage to bring the temp up to 385 degrees. Having a water based cooling system on a dirt bike is like having a temperature gauge. When the coolant boils and clouds of steam start rolling out the overflow, its telling you to shut the bike down. No warning like that with Evans. Just a seized motor. Manufacturers do a pretty good job of sizing the cooling systems on modern dirt bikes so any playing around with straight water or waterless coolant is going to push things out of balance. 50/50 water/ethylene glycol is what they are designed for and that's what I use. One last note. I've stopped using all of the motorsports industry brand coolants. I think all of them are OK if you change the coolant several times a year, but I'm pretty sure they are all lacking to varying degrees on the amount and quality of corrosion inhibitors blended in them. I've been pretty disappointed on the lack of corrosion control with all of them. Oh, and I settled Zerex Asian Formula (Silicates free) coolant on my Yamaha. With a 21psi cap, not a hint of overheating on a 90 degree day crawling up slow, steep rocky trails.
  19. MaxxRADD

    KTM 300 xc billowing clouds

    I have a 2016 KTM 300 xc and recently on start up it would make a ton of white smoke. Maybe for a minute on start up after it's been sitting for a day plus but after the smoke clears up it's alright even if I kill the bike and start it a few minutes later. The reason I'm unsure of what exactly the issue is, is because we only started getting really cold temperatures recently usually 50-70 but the last few days it's been in the 40s. So is it because of possibly jetting that isn't correct for the temperature or is a coolant leak of some sort, is it possible coolant is leaking slowly leaking into the cylinder while it sits and the smoke becomes pronounced because it has collected?
  20. redwheeliemonster

    Overheating ktms

    So I have seen a number of topics of ktm 2strokes overheating or losing coolant. As well as have a couple of friends who have had heat issues and are considering fans. I ran my cr250 for 2 hard years and didn't lose a drop. So do these bikes have malfunctioning parts or design flaws.
  21. Alright, first time posting on here so about a month ago I bought a 2003 yz250f with "a bad head gasket", he showed me the oil he drained from it there was coolant in it so it made sense he said he was riding it and it started shooting coolant out of the overflow and smoking so I bought the bike for 400$. When ive went riding with him it has always ran really good, So I ordered a cometic top end gasket kit I tore down the engine and piston, rings, and the cylinder wall all looked good so I didn't replace any of that Also the head gasket looked good and I took the head to my uncles machine shop and had it milled down its withing .002" everything in the engine looked good to me although im not a mechanic! So I put everything back together and replaced the coolant cap oil filter and it wont start, its really hard to kick. timing is perfect I did a quick valve measurement .08mm I think it was. so I don't know why it wont start it has fuel spark and compression to my knowledge any help would be appreciated thanks!
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