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Found 55 results

  1. 0 comments

    love this bike! I use it for the track and off road. perfect for me at my current speed.
  2. I wanted to share my experience for all to enjoy, ever since owning this bike a year ago, i've thoroughly enjoyed learning thru this platform bare with this story, and let me know your thoughts, honestly 2003 DRZ400S 20k miles with suspected coolant leak that i was trying to ignore After riding 2000miles and a few oil changes, i noticed stalling when running hot and coming back to idle Figured i'd clean the carb Pulled the carb, couple screws were stripped already (ordered a rebuild kit and sprayed it out with carb clean [ through drain plug and all over, letting it soak upside down, 3 times and brown stuff was flowing out]) When i put it back together, i primed it and left the prime on for a bit after it started up Heard it backfire (i think just once) It wouldn't hold idle for longer than 30 sec, blowing a little gray smoke (was thinkin it was just burnin off some junk) I messed with the fuel screw/idle screw (yes have the screw upgrade) Got it idling then the IDIOT LIGHT (coolant temp) lit up Started blowing more smoke, this time sweet and whitish Checked coolant and level and was low Next day i got more coolant in and started it up Cranked easy, after a little it would blow white sweet smoke again Noticed: -coolant leak coming out of coolant hose seal connecting to front of head -found fuel in the oil when draining fluid -also looked like oil/gas was in coolant when draining From my research (thanks team) i figured at minimum have a head gasket issue I ordered, rubber valve seals, engine gasket kit, rings.... Now i finally got to taking off the head cover today (crankcase bolt was stripped so i got to TDC by dropping it into 5th and turning the wheel before removing spark plug...) I haven't gotten deeper than that due to running outta daylight but noticed that the Exhaust Cam Cover looks way dirtier (with oil all around it) than the Intake Cam Cover I'm assuming its oil that has been burning off around the cover, what should i expect now? Feeling like i may be a bit underwater with this one but i wanna keep charging. i love my drz I'll post a pic tomorrow when i have more light THanks for reading through this case, time to get a beer, CHEERS!!!!!!!!
  3. Fast question. How and where do I check if I have the right coolant level?
  4. Hi all, I have a 2012 kx250f. I recently thought I saw something weird in the coolant. I changed it about 10 minutes ago and found lots of these little flakes in the coolant. I think it’s metal, but not sure. They aren’t magnetic so if they are it’s aluminum. What can this be, and what are the causes if it is aluminum? Here’s a picture for reference.(it’s on the tip of my thumb) there were lots of these.
  5. I just checked my coolant after reading another post about the color of his coolant, & discovered that mine has some kind of build up on the cap & fill nozzle. It appears to be calcium or something similar, whitish & salty looking. Has anyone else seen this? The coolant is clear with a pink tint & the tubes in the radiator appear to be clean but the cap & fill nozzle had this crusty stuff. I've never seen anything like this in my previous YZ's. I always used 50/50 distilled water & Prestone in them.
  6. I have a rad guard on the left hand side but it has dawned on me that not much is protecting the coolant reservoir. Is there some line of protective bracket a available?
  7. Does it help I am using antifreeze right now and my bike gets real hot in the tight stuff will engine ice help how about if I mix it with water?
  8. I just rebuilt my water pump and engine this winter. I ran 50/50 water and vinegar through the engine to flush coolant out. After doing this once I added new engine ice to the radiator. After ride for about 5 min I noticed coolant coming out of the bleed hole. all of the coolant went out of the bleed hole.
  9. Alright so i tried poking around to find a thread on this but couldnt find one.... Swear I saw one before or you'd think there would be. So the Coolant "Engine Ice"...The guy I bought my bike from had it in, and my brother just bought one who also had it in. It claims to be some good stuff... BUT i hear whole lots of horror stories about it, about how it has less lubricant in it and its really bad for your water pump, and that it heats up much faster when you're stationary. So I drained it, ran two loads of standard 50/50 prestone in it to wash out all the old crap, and use prestone 50/50 currently. what scares me is a little dripped on my driveway, and where it streamed down the cement it left these really hard black clump deposits here and there on the cement. sometimes see little black flakes floating around the radiator. IDK if its dirt or corrosion. So my question would be, For anyone with Engine ice experience, What do you think of it? And might I have a little Radiator issue or is this normal or should I flush it? Thanks a ton guys! NOTE: I already know the prestone is fine. Ran it in my last bikes and for all summer in this one. Bike is a 2008 YZ250F What coolant should I use if neither of these? Want my bike as cool & safe as possible
  10. More than you wanted to know about Liquid Engine Cooling Liquid cooling is an often overlooked part of an engine's operation. If it's not overheating then everything's good. The problem is that, when trouble does develop, the answers can be elusive. I'll come right out front by saying that I work at Evans Cooling Systems, Inc. and stand behind the properties of our waterless coolant. I'll tell you about it at the end, but first I'm going to cover some things that you should know if you choose to use a water-based anti-freeze. If you're sick of overheating, you can just skip ahead. Physics Pressure: A higher pressure will raise the boiling point of a liquid. A lower pressure will lower the boiling point. Water runs down hill. For us, it's more important to recognize that vapor wants to go up. This is why cooling systems (almost) always flow out of the bottom of the radiator, down to the pump and into the bottom of the engine. Vent lines are placed so that vapor can escape (from the pump, head, or elsewhere) and go up into the radiator. This direction of coolant flow naturally carries vapor up and out of the engine. Overheating happens when the coolant temperature reaches its failure (boiling) point. Sometimes it is said that when coolant starts spitting out, it's your warning that things are getting too hot. It's not a warning of a failure; it is the failure. Vapor shielding: As the anti-freeze begins to boil inside the cooling jacket, it forms vapor. Soon the vapor increases from a few bubbles to being a layer along the metal surface. This layer prevents liquid from contacting the metal and the metal is effectively insulated; it is no longer “liquid cooled.” The metal temperature spikes and hot spot detonation, seizure, and other engine damage are the result. Head gasket failure is due to head warping which is the result of uneven temperatures across the head. System Layout There are from 6 to 9 basic components depending on the particular layout of the cooling system: radiator(s), cap, overflow tank, hoses, hose clamps, thermostat, cooling jacket (inside engine), pump, and fan. Dirt bikes will lack some of these parts and complex street bikes can have more. Avoid Boiling the Coolant The goal of the system is to cool the engine, but that statement is too simple. The goal is to keep the metal temperatures under control and this can only happen if the liquid is in contact with the metal and carries the heat away. It is often recognized that a greater amount of heat is removed through the action of boiling, but this is only true until the bubbles formed grow big and displace the liquid coolant. If the metal is in contact with vapor, not liquid, the metal temperature cannot be controlled. Boiling coolant is to be avoided. There are two sides to improving the efficiency of your cooling system. One is maintenance and the other the choice of components. Maintenance Keep the outside surfaces of the radiator clean. Spray water through the fins from the back to clean out mud and grass. I never use a pressure washer on my bikes. Some teams put a mesh across the front of the radiators in muddy conditions. If the fins get bent, you can spend some time to straighten them out. Every little bit helps improve efficiency. Check the hoses. Obviously you are looking for cracks or bulges so they can be replaced before a failure. Keep in mind that an older hose can leak through the threads. The hose may look fine, but the coolant can get through the inside layer of rubber and then follow the threads out. Leaks don't always drip to the ground; look for a crusty streak, sometimes at the pump. Change your anti-freeze every year. After time, the corrosion inhibiting additives fall out of solution and settle out of the coolant; this is the sludge that collects at low points in the system. When this happens, the anti-freeze will continue to cool the engine as it did before, but there is much less corrosion protection. If left like this for too long, the corrosion that forms will insulate the metal surfaces from the coolant and this WILL decrease the cooling efficiency. This is why they suggest using a vinegar rinse to clean the system out. Diagnosing an overheating engine Radiator cap: Does the gasket seal? Any rips in it or dirt under it?Is the small disc on the underside free to move? This disc is the return valve that lets coolant back into the radiator from the overflow tank when the engine cools. If the cap doesn't pressurize the system because it doesn't seal, the boiling point of the coolant will be lowered and overheating is the result. A leak elsewhere in the system can also cause a loss of pressure; at operating temperature, you should feel the pressure if you squeeze a hose. Thermostat: If it is stuck open, it may be hard to warm the engine up on a cold day.If it is stuck closed, the engine will run hot or overheat. You can test it by putting it in water and seeing if/when it opens as you heat it up. Thermostats have different temperature ratings. If it's a “190 thermostat” it should be open at 190F. Racers often remove the thermostat entirely to increase the flow rate of the coolant. Do not remove a bypass type thermostat unless you constrict or block the bypass line. There is a myth out there that if you remove the thermostat, the coolant will flow too quickly to shed the heat through the radiator. The radiator can dissipate heat just fine; in fact, it becomes more efficient with a greater liquid/air temperature difference. The myth originates from a real effect which is based on pressure. The thermostat (or restrictor that may be installed in its place) raises the pressure on the coolant in the engine as the pump pushes against it. This higher pressure raises the boiling point of the coolant inside the engine. Pump: Obviously, if the pump doesn't pump, you'll overheat. These days pump impellers are likely to be plastic. We've seen manufacturing problems where the impellers separate from the shaft; you could look at this impeller and not see that it's broken, but it would come off in your hand. We've also seen the blades snap off due to cavitation. Cavitation happens when a coolant is close to its boiling point. The “draw” side of the pump naturally has a lower pressure, and this can cause the fluid to vaporize. As the blades smack against this mix of vapor and liquid, they can wear or break. The pump is not designed to pump vapor so this cavitation also slows the coolant flow which will cause the temperature to rise. If the additives in the anti-freeze have fallen out of solution or you've been using straight water without a pump lube, the pump seal can fail leading to a bearing failure. Engine oil that looks creamy is telling you that there's water in it. If it's reddish brown like peanut butter, it's rusty water. Jetting: A lean fuel/air ratio will cause an engine to run hotter. An aftermarket pipe without proper jetting/fuel injection tuning will flow more air making the engine run leaner. A clogged jet can do the same. Changing things like cams, spark advance, and compression ratio can make an engine run hotter. Ethanol in the fuel will burn leaner. Look for a possible air leak in the boot between the carburetor and head. Altitude: It's not just that the air is less dense at altitude, but the lowered ambient pressure also has an effect. The radiator cap will pressurize the system to, say, 13 psi *over the atmospheric pressure*. A lower atmospheric pressure will lower the internal system pressure. You or your friends: If you are riding slowly, there is less airflow to the radiator. If you get stuck or are waiting at a bottleneck, that problem is worse. Air Pocket: Air trapped in the system can interrupt coolant flow and cause overheating. Optimizing the System: Hoses: Silicone hoses are better quality in general and resist heat stress and age cracking. There are silicone hose kits available that eliminate the plastic Y connector. This connector has a smaller inside diameter than the hose, so it restricts the flow; get rid of it if you can. If you go to silicone hoses, spend a little more on the recommended hose clamps so that they don't cut into the silicone. Silicone hoses are more delicate in terms of impacts, so consider a guard in places where a rock may hit it. Radiators: There are a number of aftermarket radiator companies that make upgraded radiators. Generally they are bigger and/or deeper which adds fluid capacity and surface area to the system, both of which help lower coolant temperature. Whatever radiators you use, make sure they're clean inside and out. Radiator cap: A higher pressure rated cap will raise the boiling point of the coolant. Race teams sometimes take this to an extreme; I've seen auto racing teams that have an air valve on the cap so they can pressurize it with an air compressor. The FIA limited the allowed pressure in Formula One for safety reasons. I don't recommend raising the pressure more than just a few psi. Pump: There are some aftermarket pumps available. A better impeller will increase flow and an efficiently designed housing can reduce the flow restriction. Fan: There are fan kits available now for some dirt bikes; increasing air flow to the radiator will decrease the coolant temperature. Making sure the fan is operating correctly is important. There can be failures of the temperature sensor or fan switch. Some people like to install a manual switch so they can override the automatic operation. If there is a shroud around the fan or ducting that the manufacturer installed, make sure it remains as they intended. Anti-Freeze: Any coolant with water in it has the same basic properties because those properties are limited by water's characteristics. Water boils at 212F at atmospheric pressure. The boiling point is raised a little when it's mixed 50/50 with glycol, either ethylene glycol or propylene glycol. The big increase in boiling point comes from pressurizing the system. Tap water is terrible stuff to use, but most of the anti-freeze for sale today is pre-mixed with clean water anyway. Many equipment manufacturers have guidelines on the anti-freeze to use such as “no phosphate or silicate based additives”. These additives can be gritty like sand and are bad for pump seals. Limitations of Water: Water is corrosive. Anti-freeze manufacturers use a number of different additive packages to fight this property, but they all settle out after time allowing the corrosion to occur. Some additives are bad for seals like silicates. Some additives, like the OAT type(organic acid technology) degrade silicone. Water conducts electricity. This electrolysis eats metal. You can buy “sacrificial” metal tablets to put in the system that will “absorb” the damage from electrolysis. Water's boiling point is too close to the operating temperature of the coolant. There is a very narrow safety margin and the anti-freeze will boil in specific locations before the system is observed to be overheating. The area around the exhaust valves is typically quite hot. When the anti-freeze boils here, a vapor layer forms that shields the metal surface from the liquid coolant. The metal temperature then spikes and detonation is the result. The engine will run poorly and lose power as the coolant temperature approaches its failure point. While the system pressure raises the boiling point, it also sets up a situation where a puncture will expel all the coolant. Hot anti-freeze will gush from an opened cap, but not because of the pressure that the cap regulates. When the cap is removed, the pressure drops which drops the boiling point in the system. It is the flash boiling that happens inside the engine that causes the gusher. Evans Waterless Coolant: Like I said at the top, I work at Evans, but I'm not just a paid promoter. I started using Evans waterless coolant while road racing in the 1990's when it was still legal for pavement racing. As I became more familiar with its properties, I put it in all my vehicles and started selling it at the track and online. Things grew to the point that my volume was getting noticed by the company. Years later, and here we are with a formula specifically designed for the powersports industry. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me tell you about the product that I believe should be in every performance machine out there. You wouldn't take the back off your watch and pour water in it; it's time to stop pouring water in your engine! The high boiling point of Evans means that the coolant temperature won't go above its failure point. It operates within the same temperature range as conventional anti-freeze and is able to stay in contact with metal surfaces, even at stressful points like around the exhaust valves. Pump cavitation is avoided, as is electrolysis. All of Evans' coolant formulas are non-corrosive and last the lifetime of the engine. If I'm rebuilding an engine, I will save the coolant and pour it back in the rebuilt engine. Evans Coolant doesn't freeze; we state that it will flow at -40F, but we have not found a freezing point. After lowering a sample to -60F without freezing, we decided to talk about its pour point like the oil industry does. Evans Coolant is a patented blend of chemicals, most of which are commonly found in conventional anti-freeze formulas, and additives with no water. It is not a gel and will not turn gooey if anti-freeze is added to it. If something were to happen on the trail and you are forced to add water or anti-freeze, it will simply perform like conventional anti-freeze, no worse. Information on the web about poor cold weather performance of Evans Coolant refers to our oldest formula. The current formulas are approved for all weather conditions and are mandated by Rotax for use in their 900 series aircraft engines. Evans Coolant has a high boiling point of 375F at atmospheric pressure. While it does not need pressure to raise its boiling point, we do not recommend modifying the system to hold zero pressure. It will expand 7% at operating temperature so you will notice some movement to the expansion tank, but it doesn't build pressure like water does. If you were to open the cap when hot, it shouldn't spurt out. A little might come out, like a tablespoon, but if more does, it is a sign that there is either water present or an air pocket in the system. The added safety margin of the high boiling point will save the engine when conditions become extreme. Through an unintentional error that cut air flow to the radiator, I saw the coolant temperature on my road race bike go to 297F. The bike was still running alright, so we changed the oil and fixed the cause of the problem. The engine ran fine for all the races that weekend and then all the races at the finals at Daytona. Evans Powersports Coolant is trusted by race teams around the world. I encourage you to go to our website www.evanscooling.com to learn more and see the interview with Jay Leno or stop by our Facebook page http://www.facebook....300949013264495 for a more personal interaction. When you hear about our Chinese business, you should know that we make the coolant in Pennsylvania and export it into China. Evans China has installed American made waterless coolant into more than 150,000 new passenger cars so far!
  11. I live here in Iowa so the winters can get down to -25 or so and the summer heat can sometimes get to 115 degrees. What Anti-freeze would you recomend to put in my bike? Do any of you use Engine Ice? Im thinking about buying a jug. I also just bought this bike so im not sure what anit-freeze he has in it.
  12. What’s up everyone. So I know this has been touched on a lot. I’ve read lots of different forums but can’t quite find an answer to my problem. So I’m fairly new to the riding world. I’ve always rode friends bikes a couple times a year on camping trips or occasional weekends. I’ve never owned my own bike til now. I’m by all means a novice rider. I’ve recently purchased an 07 CRF450R. Probably not the best beginners bike but I couldn’t pass the deal. Anyways I’m having issues with the bike overheating. I’m assuming it’s because I’m riding trails that are pretty tight and like I said I’m a new rider and not riding as fast as a more experienced rider would. Therefor I imagine the radiators aren’t getting the proper air flow. That being said is there anything I can do or add to help stop my bike from puking all the coolant out of the overflow tube? I’ve read a lot about Evans coolant but not sure if that’s the way to go for my situation. Last thing I want to do is start melting things from the inside out. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks guys and gals!
  13. So previously I had an issue of coolant leaking out of my head on my 2001 rm125 (between the cylinder and head) as well as the head studs. I took the head off and resurfaced it until it was flat with no wobble against glass. I put it all back together today and rode around for like 7 minutes, then when I stopped I noticed coolant leaking out of every single head stud. It continues to leak but slower after the dirt bike is shut off. This is all with new o rings in the head from the tusk kit. What is my problem? Please help, I’ve been facing this issue for two weeks now waiting to ride with my friends. the picture included is of the head after I resurfaced it. added: there is an overflow tube at the top of my radiator so if there was excess pressure I would assume that it would come out if that tube and not the head studs
  14. My bike likes to overheat when I'm going very slow, I'm sure it's not uncommon. When I'm in the trails and going faster, it's fine. Sometimes I just like to putt around my small set of trails I have at my house, and I don't get out of first gear. About an hour and a half later, my bike overheats and starts peeing coolant. Any way I can stop this? Or at least make it more resistant? And I can't go faster in my set of trails, there are 90 degree turns every 5 feet.
  15. Hello everyone, This is my first post here so I apologize if I'm posting in the wrong thread or something like that. Anyways, a few days ago(Friday the 13th) I decided to take my 2001 Drz400E out for a spin in the woods outside my neighborhood. Long story short, I drowned the thing. Three hours and a lot of cussing later and I got the thing out of the mud and back home. Moral of the story? Stick to the trails. When I got the thing back home I discovered two problems: 1.) The bike was leaking coolant, No clue where from. 2.) The bike wouldn't rev over 4.5k rpm. If I give it more gas, it stalls. I did some research on the rev thing and apparently cleaning the carb/jet fixes this(If anyone can confirm this it'd be helpful). I removed the carb, cleaned it, and everything looks fine. I haven't tested it, however, because of the coolant leak. I figured running the bike with next to no coolant probably isn't a good idea. I also don't feel like putting everything back on the bike just to end up tearing it apart to fix the other stuff. I heard from a friend that water could have caused a gasket to leak, but I'm not exactly eager to tear apart my engine to find out. If you guys could give me any advice, it'd be a big help(Especially since I've got a road trip planned for memorial day).
  16. 5 reviews

    Evans Powersports Coolant offers improved performance and reliability. Even under extreme conditions, Evans Powersports Coolant will not overheat. Using Evans Coolant allows the engine to be safely tuned for more power. A higher compression ratio, leaner mixture, and more advanced spark are some of the options available to the engine builder. Evans Powersports Coolant provides permanent cooling protection for the life of the engine so replacement is never necessary. Its superior corrosion protection is not degraded over time and it won’t freeze or damage engine components.
  17. 7 reviews

    Made of Propylene which is biodegradeable and non-toxic Premixed with deionized water which eliminates all impurities - even distilled water contains particles of metal and chemicals which cause scarring, scaling, clogging and mineral buildup Proven to reduce operating temperatures by as much as 50 deg F - a necessity for todays high-performance bikes which overheat just idling Engine ice is the only coolant sold in motorcycle dealerships that is legal in AMA, CCS, FUSA Road Racing and AMA/Prostar Drag Racing Used by top racers like James Stewart, Ernesto Fonseca, Chad Reed, Rand Hawkins and many more 4/case
  18. 0 comments

    Having not hit the trails or an enduro for the better part of 14 years I decided to pull the trigger on a 2015 CRF250L, I almost purchased the WR250 but the price and my credit kind of pushed it out of the running, not to mention that I tend to be a bit short 5' 8" and the WR felt like I was climbing a minor mountian. To preface the last time I rode 2 strokes were legal, and a fuel injected bike didn't exist. At any rate having recently gotten my 93 DR350 running but lacking a title to go street legal I opted for the CRF. Out of the shop I noticed that it was for lack of a better term kinda nutless. Here in Texas many of the backroads are 75 mph so it is somewhat harrowing to push the bike that hard. <br /><br /> <br /><br />I rode on it untouched for a month, I did like my commute gas bill going from $44 a week in my truck to $5.44 every 2 weeks on the Honda. Where the bike was a pure joy to ride was the woods. No you won't be climbing mountians on it but it is so nimble in the woods vs the old DR. The suspension and stock tires are a bit hard to deal with but honestly who in their right mind buys a dual purpose with the intent of nailing doubles at the local MX track. I have kind of gotten a bit out of shape and still the stock suspension suits my needs. To be honest I like how it dives a bit in the turns. The real test was a 329 mile back roads ride from Austin to DFW and back. The average speed limit was 75 posted I was having trouble holding 70 and about 100 miles in thanked god I changed the seat. In strong cross winds the higher center of gravity is a bit harder to deal with. I also noticed it seems to run a bit hot especially on your left knee as the fan kicks on. I was a bit afraid of overheating but Captian Slow plodded along. (yeah I named the bike after James May on top gear UK) If you are shy on cash and you have $300 to pick any mods I would stress the 13t sprocket, seat, and handgrips. You will thank yourself so will your rear and hands. After it's paid off I plan to go full on modding.<br /><br /> <br /><br />I finally dropped a bit of money into it (not the warranty voiding variety)<br /><br />I went to a 13T front sprocket (made all of the gears useable with the 14T i considered 4th gear an option and nigh useless)<br /><br />got a seat concepts low profile seat (yeah I am short 5'8" and 210 lbs...)<br /><br />Tusk Fat bar with adapter<br /><br />Holeshot pad for a gps / smart phone<br /><br />Tusk hand guards<br /><br />Protaper Pillow grips<br /><br /> <br /><br />This notched the comfort level up a good bit, I wanted new suspension and the FMF but I like my warranty and after a full bottom and top end rebuild on the DR I don't feel like turning a wrench on my commuter.<br /><br /> <br /><br />Pros:<br /><br />It is cheaper than the competition.<br /><br />5 year warranty for $400, yeah that is nice.<br /><br />Gas mileage is not the 73 it claims it is closer to about 56 - 60 but still...<br /><br />The Service intervals, it is a cheap ride if you take care of it.<br /><br />It is a good bike if you trend shorter<br /><br />Nimble in the woods<br /><br />It runs well on 87 octane actually mine seems to prefer 87...<br /><br />Brakes are pretty darn good.<br /><br />I have to say it but it is a good looking machine stock.<br /><br />The clutch has a 1 finger pull, easiest I have ever had.<br /><br /> <br /><br /> <br /><br />Cons:<br /><br />It's power is underwhealming even vs a 22 year old air cooled 4 stroke.<br /><br />The stock seat is like having a 2x4 wedged up your crack<br /><br />The stock bars and grips transfer excessive vibration and cause a good deal of arm pump.<br /><br />The stock 14t front sproket makes the bike run a bit jerky especially in lower gears.<br /><br />Since it has a fuel pump and fuel injector I fear running gas out on it will end up torching the fuel system.<br /><br />The low fuel indicator comes on at half a gallon left and is very touchy with slopes.<br /><br />I think the idle is set too low from the factory and it likes to stall.<br /><br />The clutch feels like it does not fully engage ever.<br /><br /> <br /><br />Conclusion:<br /><br />If I could go back in time and pick a different bike as a dual sport I would petition Honda to make a 450L, none of the other offerings are in my price range or near as a complete package as a 250L. The WR is nicer off the floor but for the price the performance isn't a lot better (got to try a friends) The Suzuki was almost my choice but it had a bulkiness to it I didn't quite like and was too tall. Anything 650? No thanks. I would still walk off the showroom floor with the same 250L. Update: Stage 1 mods, very fun I can now accelerate in a headwind. Decided to go back to stock gearing since it is my commuter and the stage one gave it some balls. Saving up for a racetech or YSS rear Racetech front suspension rebuild. If the tax return is big enough this year maybe I can pay it off and 305 it as well. Man I don't think I could like this bike more except I got to try a road legal 2015 WR450L that well makes me kind of wander, then again even with all the mods the CRF250L still comes out $700 cheaper also the seat height on the WR would make me have to carry phone books in my riding pack.
  19. 0 comments

    I've added over $4k of modifications to this cycle shortly after purchasing it. I'm intending this cycle to be a dual sport in purpose, and a USA BDR rider in particular. So, it will see freeway roads and speeds in excess of 75 MPH with hours of seat time slabbing it. It will also see sketchy two track and possible some single track, mud and for sure, some deep sand. So, *lots* of different conditions will be in view during the build, and as you consider the mods I make, please keep in mind my purpose for this cycle. Everything is a trade off, a compromise. Including cost. For instance, I did not / will not add a Rally tower or Rally type lighting. It's just too darned expensive for my purpose. But, I *am* big on protecting the cycle from hits and drops. So, I build out a layered approach to protection, with an eye on weight since I'll have to pick it up when I drop it. I'm also big on protecting *me* in these various environments. I can do something about the (my) body protection with various clothing armor pieces. I try to be seen, too. So, I'm big on lighting up the front, back and sides because drivers need to see me as best as I can make that happen. Sure, BDR riding does not need all that lighting. But, getting there and connecting the trail bits via roads *does* need it. So, it's on there. I referenced a lot of other folk's builds, picking out the pieces that I thought would be beneficial without adding too much weight, cost, or just too "blingy" for my taste. Kudos to Rocky Mountain ATV.com, and ADVPulse.com for their build descriptions. I also bought from KTM Twins.com, but I'm not very happy with that experience (returns take forever, and they dinged me for a lot of cash, for doing it). Probably not buying from them, if I can help it, anymore. Have a look...
  20. MandM

    White smoke

    I can fix things but for the most part I’m Ignorant until I learn from my mistakes. I Just bought my first bike its a 98 cr250. I know 2 strokes smoke and the bike started when I kicked every time on the 1st or 2nd kick- was super fast with a clean idle and great response so I thought the smoke was something normal. After doing more research I’ve found that the bright white and sweet smelling smoke is a very bad thing and it hasn’t gone away. I’m hoping for help from someone who’s been here before. I guess my first question is how much harm have I done / am I going to do by running this thing? At the moment I’ve only really started it twice and let it run for maybe 10 minutes each time. I’d really like to take it out at least one time before tearing it all apart but I don’t want to risk making the situation worse. Second question- it runs so well I guess I’m expecting it’s not a head gasket issue? Does anyone have any advice on what/how to troubleshoot before tearing everything apart?... and even (fingers crossed ) could it be anything else? Is it okay to spray that area with carb cleaner and search for a vacuum leak. Any help and advice is appreciated. Thank you for reading my novel.
  21. So I did a complete rebuild, everything. I have the jetting on the rich side, 55 pilot, 168 main, stock needle. 2002 kx250. I rode a good hard 25 min moto Sunday. This is the first time I have stretched her and let run. When pulling off, she idled up and back down erratic, like a lean condition. Maybe once every 5 or 6 seconds at worst. i shut her down, coolant level was good, it did not do that earlier in the moto. i did notice itlater on though. so once she is warm is when she did it. i have a boyeson super cooler, so flow and volume are not it? I know it isn't lean, so is that an overheat issue?
  22. If this question has been answered, please point me in the right direction. Otherwise here goes. My 2000 DRZ-400S coolant overflow/expansion tank was almost full when I bought it. The bike started over heating. Checked the radiator level and it had emptied itself (this is when I first bought the bike so I was unfamiliar with every bit of it). Flushed the system, put 50/50 standard mix in, got what air bubbles I could out, and replaced the cap with a new stock one. Everything seems fine except that darn tank is still filling up. I can put air pressure on the hose to push the fluid back into the radiator but it fills up the very next ride. Any ideas to why this is happening and what I can do to fix it? Thanks
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