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Found 16 results

  1. Hey all, I have been waiting for this day for quite a while. I am finally able to fix my bike, i've been in debt for some time but the day has come Now i have a question, when I got my bike checked out at the shop, i was told i could rebuild my crank with any rod and bearings from 1986-2000. I am going to purchase an entire new hot rods crank instead. Am i able to order any crank from 1986-2000 for my bike? Mine is a 1987. I just want to make sure I am getting the correct part before I spend the money! Appreciate any replies or help. Thanks!!
  2. Hey guys and gals, I ended up getting a knocking noise after a long run... About 10 minutes away from my house on the return route too :(. Anyways, I took the engine apart and the connecting rod has some play in it and not just side movement. I can get a video of it tomorrow BUT either way, I'm wondering the cost of the repair. When the connecting rod gets this, is it just the bearing that needs to be replaced or is it the whole crank? I really hope for my wallets sake it isn't the second one..
  3. So tell me. How and why? It was an idle to midrange rev on the stand and on the decel it started this, didn't seize anything at all just flat out broke.
  4. Wiseco's new Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits offer everything you need for a bottom and top end rebuild. From the crank to the piston kit, and even an hour meter to track maintenance, everything is included in one box. Here we take a look at the components included, and the technology behind them. So, the time has come for an engine rebuild. Hopefully it’s being done as a practice of proper maintenance, but for many it will be because of an engine failure. Whether the bottom end, top end, or both went out, the first step is to disassemble and inspect. After determining any damage done to engine cases or the cylinder, and arranging for those to be repaired/replaced, you’re faced with choosing what internal engine components to buy, where to get them, and how much the costs are going to add up. A full engine rebuild is a serious job and requires a lot of parts to be replaced, especially in four-strokes. You have to think of bottom end bearings and seals, a crankshaft assembly, piston, rings, clips, wristpin, and the plethora of gaskets required for reassembly. If you’re doing this rebuild yourself, or having your local shop do the labor, chances are you don’t have a factory team budget to spend on parts. However, you know you want high-quality and durable parts, because you don’t want to find yourself doing this again anytime soon. Rebuilding a dirt bike engine is an involved job, requiring many parts to be replaced. Missing one seal or gasket can put the whole rebuild on hold. You could source all the different parts you need from different vendors to find the best combination of quality and affordability. But, it can get frustrating when 6 different packages are coming from 6 different vendors at different times, and each one relies on the next for you to complete your rebuild. Wiseco is one of the manufacturers that has been offering top end kits (including piston, rings, clips, gaskets, and seals) all in one box, under one part number for many years. Complete bottom end rebuild kits are also available from Wiseco, with all necessary parts under one part number. So, it seemed like a no brainer to combine the top and bottom end kits, and throw in a couple extra goodies to make your complete engine rebuild in your garage as hassle free as possible. Top-end piston kits and bottom-end kits come together to create Wiseco Garage Buddy rebuild kits. Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are exactly as the name implies, the buddy you want to have in your garage that has everything ready to go for your engine rebuild. Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits come with all parts needed to rebuild the bottom and top end, plus an hour meter—with a Garage Buddy specific decal—to track critical maintenance intervals and identify your rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. The kits include: Crankshaft assembly OEM quality main bearings All engine gaskets, seals, and O-rings Wiseco standard series forged piston kit (piston, ring(s), pin, clips) Small end bearing (for two-strokes) Cam chain (for four-strokes) Hour meter with mounting bracket and hour meter decal Open up a Garage Buddy kit, and you'll find all the components you need to rebuild your bottom and top end. 2-stroke and 4-stroke Whether your machine of choice is a 2-stroke or a 4-stroke, Wiseco can help you with your rebuild. 2-stroke Wiseco Garage Buddy kits include everything listed above, featuring a Wiseco forged Pro-Lite piston kit. You don’t even have to worry about sourcing a small-end bearing, that’s included too. 2-stroke fans often brag about the ability to rebuild their bikes so much cheaper than their 4-stroke counterparts, and they’ll have even more ammo for bragging now with these kits starting in the $400 range. A Wiseco 2-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, plus an hour meter to track your next maintenance intervals. However, don’t abandon your 4-stroke yet. Many riders cringe—and rightfully so—at the thought of rebuilding their 4-stroke because of the costs associated, but Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kits starting in the $600s takes a lot of sting off your rebuild project. They even include a new timing chain. No matter what you’re rebuilding, you’ll be able to track key maintenance intervals for your fresh engine with the Wiseco hour meter and log book that’s included in the Garage Buddy kits. All Garage Buddy kits include a specific hour meter decal as well, which is important for the limited warranty to identify the rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. A Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, including a cam chain and an hour meter. Ease of ordering Wiseco Garage Buddy kits come with the listed parts boxed up in one box, and listed under one part number, which makes it nice to not have to worry about if you might’ve missed something when ordering. Simply find the single part number for your model, order, and you’re on your way to brand new performance. Quality Performance, backed by a Limited Warranty Ordering convenience doesn’t make a difference if the parts do not provide quality and reliability. Wiseco crankshafts are designed completely by in-house engineers, who determine all assembled dimensions, clearances, materials, and specifications. These specifications have been determined from R&D tests such as hand inspection, dyno, and failure analysis. Once Wiseco cranks have been manufactured to exact specifications they are batch inspected, and critical tolerances and dimensions are measured. Major inspections and tests include crank run-out and trueness, because they must operate within a strict tolerance to last long and perform well. Wiseco crankshafts and bearings are manufactured and tested according to strict tolerances and clearances, including run-out and trueness. Crankshaft designs are also tested for 4 hours at WOT. Bearings are another critical point of inspection. Wiseco has worked to build relationships with top-tier bearing suppliers to provide a long lasting, low-friction product. Debris in a bearing can lead to very fast wear, and Wiseco makes it a point to inspect batches of bearings for cleanliness and proper operation. As part of the design and engineering process, prototype crankshafts are hand inspected and dyno-tested at wide open throttle for 4 consecutive hours. This is a benchmark test, and new crankshaft designs must pass it before to be deemed worthy for manufacturing. Watch our crank R&D and inspection process. A Warranty on Engine Internals? Yes! Wiseco is committed to providing performance and reliability in all their products. This is why Garage Buddy kits come with a limited warranty. Rebuild your engine with a Garage Buddy kit, and your new Wiseco components are covered against manufacturer defects for 90 days from the date of purchase, or 10 hours logged on the hour meter, whichever comes first. Check out all the warranty details on the detail sheet in your new Garage Buddy kit. Open up your Garage Buddy kit and you'll find a detail sheet on the warranty on your new components. Forged Pistons The top end kits included in Garage Buddy kits feature a Wiseco forged piston, which are designed, forged, and machined completely in-house in the U.S.A. Four-stroke Garage Buddy kits come with a Wiseco standard forged piston, which offers stock compression and more reliability and longevity, thanks to the benefits of the forging process. Two-stroke Garage Buddy kits include a Wiseco Pro-Lite forged piston, which is the two-stroke piston that has been providing two-stroke riders quality and reliability for decades. Some applications, two and four-stroke, even feature ArmorGlide skirt coating, reducing friction and wear for the life of the piston. Forged aluminum has an undeniable advantage in strength over cast pistons, thanks to the high tensile strength qualities of aluminum with aligned grain flow. Read more about our forging process here, and get all the details on our coatings here. All Wiseco pistons are forged in-house from aluminum. Some pistons may also come with ArmorGlide skirt coating, and some 2-stroke pistons may already have exhaust bridge lubrication holes pre-drilled. All pistons are machined on state-of-the-art CNC machine equipment, then hand finished and inspected for quality. The forged pistons come complete with wrist pin, clips, and high-performance ring(s). Lastly, all gaskets and seals are made by OEM quality manufactures. Sealing components are not something to ever go cheap on, because no matter how high-quality your moving components are, if your engine is not sealing properly, it’s coming back apart. Need some tips on breaking in your fresh engine? Check this out. Gaskets and seals provided in Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are OEM quality, ensuring your freshly rebuilt engine is properly sealed.
  5. HELP PLEASE!!! I just replaced the crank and main bearings on a 2010 KX250F with a Hot Rods crank and bearings kit. All went well during the rebuild thus far. When I attempt to torque (87inlb) the case bolts the crank starts to tighten up and gets worse at the case gap closes tighter. The bearings are seated all of the way. I've pulled the bearings and re-installed them to make sure that they were seated correctly. Upon inspection i noticed that the Hot Rods crank is wider than the OEM crank by roughly 1 mm. Total length is the same but the actual crank body is a little wider. I can see a very small gap between both sides of the crank and left / right case halves. However, the gap is a little bigger on the right side. The crank does not appear to be rubbing on the case though. See picture below. I can't find what the spec for this gap measurement is in the manual. My guess is that the crank being 1 mm wider than the stock is putting the bearings in a bind when I try to torque the 8mm case bolts. Any help would be appreciated. Not sure where to go from here and could use some advice.
  6. Hey guys and gals, I ended up getting a knocking noise after a long run... About 10 minutes away from my house on the return route too :(. Anyways, I took the engine apart and the connecting rod has some play in it and not just side movement. I can get a video of it tomorrow BUT either way, I'm wondering the cost of the repair. When the connecting rod gets this, is it just the bearing that needs to be replaced or is it the whole crank? I really hope for my wallets sake it isn't the second one..
  7. Okay. So I bought this 87 xr600r with a snapped connecting rod and broken pieces off the cylinder for $200. So I bought a new cylinder and crankshaft. I took apart the casings and replaced the crankshaft. But the new crank seems to have a longer flywheel mounting shaft and caused it to stick out about a 1/4 inch and will not allow case cover to fit flush, instead a 1/4 inch gap. How could I go about this without having to get a new crank and re-replace it.
  8. Hey everyone, forever having issues on this 2001 yz125 still. 2 sets of new crank seals and were still having bad seal issues, first set was cometic and the second was OEM. The ignition side seal has a very visible gap between the crank and the sealing surface which is letting fuel into the ignition side cover and causing the bike to run very poorly. My first question is, do the crank seals seat against the crank or the bearing? we pushed it in to the manual specs but im wondering if its supposed to be all the way against the bearing? I was also wondering if anyone with a 2001-2004 bike could tell me or possibly measure their own crank to see what the diameter of the shaft is where the left side seal sits? this measurement is not in the manual and i would like to compare it with whats in the bike My worry is that the previous owner dropped in a crank from the wrong year
  9. Have a 1985 Cr80. Needs a full rebuild. Any ideas what matches up? Having a hard time finding a crankshaft...
  10. My crank bearing seized and I split my engine and a gear a washer and what seemed to be a sleeve over a shaft came out and I cant tell if the gear is just floating there or what order the 3 parts go together in.
  11. Blew top and bottom end last week and my cylinder, piston , crank , head are all destroyed, not sure about anything else yet . I wanted to know if anyone knew where to get a brand new oem cylinder, everywhere has shown that they were out of stock or not able to be added to my cart. If anyone knows where I can get a new oem cylinder please let me know where and a price if possible , thank you
  12. Purchase any Wiseco Powersports product(s) with a subtotal of $250 or more between March 21st 2018 and May 31st 2018, and receive a ProX air filter FREE by mail-in rebate! Just follow the redemption process outlined below. A Race-Quality, Dual-Stage Air Filter for Free! ProX air filters feature dual-stage bonded foam, to capture dirt and debris, from coarse to fine. The thick, flat sealing ring provides a proper seat on the air box, to keep everything but air out. ProX air filters optimize air flow and protection in one package. How to Redeem Your Free ProX Air Filter: Purchase Wiseco Powersports product subtotaling $250 or more between March 21st 2018 and May 31st 2018. Download the rebate form here. Complete the form and include a copy of your receipt showing the seller's name/company and selling price(s), and the product serial number(s). Cut out the barcode label(s) on the side of the box with the Wiseco part number(s) and mail in with your redemption form. Mail completed form and copy of receipt to: Wiseco Performance Products Attn: ProX Air Filter Rebate 7201 Industrial Park Blvd. Mentor, Ohio 44060 You will receive your free air filter in 4-6 weeks. Go here for complete details and terms and conditions. ProX air filters feature dual-stage bonded foam and thick sealing rings, creating a reliable combination of protection and performance. Learn about proper air filter maintenance and performance here.
  13. Hey guys new to the forum, but long time reader. I noticed a weird noise coming from my bike a few weeks ago, but haven’t noticed any performance lost when riding. Someone told me it sounded like the power valve clicking, others said it was the rod main bearing. Any input. This is on a 250 2004 rm. thanks. https://youtu.be/Zm8DW92Re24
  14. Anyone have any tips on rebuilding a bottom end on a 2012 WR450? It's been like 30 years since I rebuilt a bottom end on a 2 stroke, and I have a friend local who I can fall back on if I have issues. I recently broke the case where the clutch arm actuator is, and the seal is leaking pretty bad (Chain guide broke off from the swing-arm and came around). I tried to replace the seal, but no luck. Off the top of my head, I have approximately 500 hours on the bottom. The head was rebuilt a year ago by fast heads, and at that time, I also replaced the timing chain, piston rings, cam chain tensioner. I haven't checked the hours and this is 1 of my 2 bikes, so pretty sure the parts mentioned can be re-used (maybe max 30 hours). I was thinking rings and wrist pin bearing max for the top. For the bottom.. Re-use the crank, or get a new one? I see you can buy the Rod, Pin, and Bearing for about half the price, but then I'd need to find a machine shop to put it together right. What about the Oil pump? Looking at the parts diagram, there is a pump assembly and a rotor assembly.. are both these wear items? You guys pull the motor out with the head and then disassemble, or take the head/cylinder off before removal? Do new cases come with most of the bearings and seals installed, or is that something I'll have to buy and install? Thanks.
  15. Hi all, I’m thinking about buying a 02 CR125. It has a full engine rebuild. Crank,rod,piston,rings (wiseco) I’ve heard a lot of bad things about the wiseco cranks. Saying that they break less then 50 hours. If anyone has used wiseco cranks before can you let me know how it went and all? Thanks
  16. Many riders associate the need for a bottom end rebuild with a costly trip to the shop. However, saving on labor and parts isn't out of the question with the help of ProX. We put together a list of 10 tips to help those who want to tackle the rebuild themselves. Rebuilding the bottom end of your engine, whether two or four-stroke, can be a fun and rewarding job. Additionally, a considerable amount of money can be saved by taking on the work yourself versus tasking a shop to perform the work. These statements are only true, however, assuming the bottom end rebuild is performed correctly. This is a huge caveat, and for the average weekend warrior who doesn’t perform this task often, unfamiliarity with technique and componentry can lead to errors. To help ensure your next bottom end rebuild is executed to a professional level, here’s 10 tips which will elevate your confidence and understanding as an amateur engine builder. The tips will be presented in chronological order. Let’s get started! Rebuilding the bottom end yourself can be a daunting, yet rewarding, task. Just make sure you take the engine out of the frame first! Correct Tools, Correct Diagnostics, Correct Expectations, Correct Replacement Components Successfully rebuilding your bottom end starts with planning and preparation. Starting with tools, you’ll need a few specialty tools in conjunction with your standard sockets, wrenches, etc. Namely, the correct flywheel puller for your specific engine, a flywheel holding tool, a crankcase splitting tool, a blind bearing puller, and a crankshaft puller. Using heat to assist in removal/installation of the bearings and crankshaft is an effective method, so an oven and freezer are also noteworthy items. You need to have a copy of the factory service manual or equivalent for your particular vehicle. I highly recommend reviewing the sequence of events and procedure in advance of executing the work. If you are rebuilding the bottom end because of a failure, be sure to inspect all components to identify the cause of the failure and determine what was damaged. This will ensure your rebuilt engine will not encounter the same problem. Bottom ends are taken apart for many different reasons. If a major failure occurred, the scrutiny of the rebuild will be at a much higher level than a bottom end that is merely being reconditioned. If any problems were persistent when the machine was operated, such as a poorly shifting gearbox, or leaks between the crankcases, the causation of these issues must be identified prior to reassembly. Replacement components are a major factor to consider, both in terms of cost and engine performance, when diving into a bottom end rebuild. Replacing bearings, seals, gaskets, and refurbishing the crankshaft either by rebuilding or replacing it is essential. It’s recommended to peruse your service manual or microfiches ahead of the rebuild to generate a list of replacement components. Selection of components and sourcing them should also be planned out. In addition to OEM options, brands such as ProX offer OEM quality parts at more affordable prices. Complete crankshafts, connecting rod kits, bearings, seals, and many other components can be found for a wide variety of engine models that can make the rebuilding process easy and affordable. All ProX bottom end parts are made by OE manufacturers and suppliers to OE standards, so your mind can rest easy that your rebuild can retain OEM quality and longevity. Click here to see more about ProX drop-in ready complete crankshafts. ProX bottom end components are manufactured by OE suppliers to OE specifications. Crankshafts, gaskets, seals, and bearings are available to cover your bottom end rebuild with OEM reliability and performance. Find all the OEM replacement parts you need for your bike here. Keeping Track of Hardware As the engine is torn apart, you will amass a significant number of components, bolts, nuts, and miscellaneous hardware. Properly keeping track of these items is critical. I prefer to lay sub-systems out on a large table, remove the bare minimum of components/hardware to get to the items I’m servicing, and stick bolts through cardboard in the pattern they were removed from components (think crankcases and covers). This methodology reduces the number of mixups that can occur and ensures bolts of varying length will be reinstalled in their original location. While my method is far from the only one, make sure you have a robust and sustainable system for keeping track of everything. Flywheel Removal Commonly, two specialty tools are required to remove the flywheel - a flywheel puller and a flywheel holder. It is imperative that both are utilized. Many rebuilds have gone awry because a flywheel holding tool was not used during the rebuild. Instead, the crankshaft was secured from the primary drive side when the flywheel nut was removed/installed. At face value, this may not seem like a big deal, however, when the flywheel is removed, or more importantly installed, in this fashion, a torque is exerted across the crankshaft. While it may seem implausible, the twisting force that is exerted can actually alter the trueness of the crankshaft. Using proper tools is critical. Pictured here is a clutch holder, used in aiding in clutch component removal, which also doubles as a flywheel holder. The small dowels on the back of the arms of the tool sit inside the recesses in the flywheel to hold it in place while removing the flywheel. Crankcase Separation There are a few noteworthy items to discuss when separating the crankcases. First off, I always recommend blocking the crankcases so that the split line lies horizontally, and confirming which side should be oriented face up. Doing this will reduce the likelihood of components falling out and ensure that subsequent removal of components goes smoothly. When installing the crankcase splitter, make sure a protective cap is used to cover the end of the crankshaft. This applies to both two and four-strokes, but is especially critical on four-stroke engines that pass oil out the end of the crankshaft. Be sure to position the crankcase splitter arms as close to equispaced from one another as possible. Also, ensure that the splitter studs utilize thread engagement at least 1.5 times the diameter of the bolt. For example, most crankcase bolt holes are 6mm, so the stud should be screwed down at least 9mm to ensure adequate thread engagement. Removing the crank after the cases have been split is another critical job that requiring a special tool. We always recommend using a crank puller. The puller can also be used to install the crankshaft. Once the crankcase splitter is set up, it is imperative that separation happens evenly around the periphery of the crankcases. Screwdrivers and the like should never be used to facilitate separation. Instead, a rubber mallet can be used to encourage separation. Seal and Bearing Removal The use of seal pullers to facilitate seal removal is not completely necessary, but is definitely recommended. Their use reduces the likelihood of bore damage during removal. Bearing removal can be done with or without heat. However, the former seems to be a better method. Using heat to remove the crankcase bearings reduces bearing bore wear and work on part of the rebuilder. I do want to note that your heat source and surrounding area can become odorous due to the residual oils that become heated during the process. For this reason, it is advisable to thoroughly clean the crankcases prior to heating them up, as well as keeping ventilation in mind. After heating the crankcase halves, use a hammer and punch to remove any bearings that did not come out on their own. Be careful not to damage the bearing bores when doing this. To remove the bearings by heating the crankcase halves, position the crankcase halves split line down on a pair of trays. The trays will catch the bearings and any oil that did not get cleaned out. The oven, grill, or heat source should be set at 350 degrees Farenheit, and the crankcases should be heated for around half an hour. After, the majority of the crankcase bearings should fall out of their bores. Any bearings that did not drop out should be carefully tapped out with a punch and hammer. Bearings situated in blind bearing bores that did not fall out should be removed with the assistance of a blind bearing puller. If you do not want to or can’t use the heating method to remove the bearings, an arbor or hydraulic press may be utilized to aid in removal. A blind bearing puller will also have to be heavily relied on to facilitate removal. Due to the unevenness of load distribution that can result from pounding the bearings out with a hammer, we caution against this as a primary form of removal without the aid of heat. Cleaning, Case, and Component Inspection At this point, it is my recommendation that all components that originated inside the crankcases be thoroughly cleaned. Clean components will ensure easy and accurate inspections. On four-stroke engines that have oil passages running through the crankcases, cylinder, and cylinder head, it is imperative that these are cleaned and blown out. This is especially true if the engine suffered a major failure where oil contamination was a resulting issue. Similarly, on two-strokes, the passages that lead to the crank bearings should be cleaned. Component inspections should be conducted to assess the condition of the gearbox, crankcase bearing bores, and crankshaft. The crankshaft should either be rebuilt or replaced depending on the severity of wear and desires of the builder. Should you determine you'd like to rebuild your crank, ProX offers OEM quality connecting rod kits that can be used for a crankshaft rebuild. Unless you are experienced in this field and have the tools, crankshaft rebuilds should be trusted in the hands of a reputable shop. ProX connecting rods are double-forged, Japanese steel, and are heat treated and shot peened for strength and longevity. Read about the advtantages of ProX connecting rods here. Crankshaft Trueness Regardless of whether a new or rebuilt crankshaft is utilized, the trueness of the crankshaft must be checked. This can be farmed out to a competent shop, machinist, or if properly equipped, performed in-house. While it should normally be expected that new or rebuilt cranks are within runout specifications, the trueness of the crankshaft is imperative to long-term durability. Checking is insurance that our postal system didn’t drop your crank, and that the factory or rebuilder did their job correctly. Bearing Installation Similar to removal, heat can also aid in bearing installation. The same heating recommendations apply, and once at temperature, the majority of the bearings should fall to the bottom of their bores without any input. The caveat to this is the bearing dropping into the bore cock-eyed. When this happens, a punch and hammer should be used be help square the bearing to its bore. Be sure to tap on the outer race of the bearing. To ensure the bearings are at the bottom of their bores, they should be tapped to confirm they are fully seated. Bearings should be tapped on their outer races only to make sure they are completely and squarley seated in their bores. Alternatively, if you don’t want to, or can’t use heat, an arbor or hydraulic press should be utilized to install the bearings. Be sure to load the bearings through their outer races when pressing them in place. Seal Installation Seals can be tapped into place with a seal driver or socket and hammer. Alternatively, a press can be used. The important checks to perform are to ensure the seals have been installed squarely in their respective bores, and at any prescribed depths outlined in the service manual. Any seals installed cock-eyed will wear out prematurely. When installing new seals, make sure they are completely seated by using a seal driver or socket and hammer. Use caution and make sure the tools don't come in contact with anything but the seal. To prepare for the new bearing and seal installation, complete crankshaft bearing and seal kits are available through ProX. ProX uses reputable, OEM bearing and seal suppliers for all parts in order to maintain OEM quality. Ordering in kits creates less hassle and is a budget-friendly step in your rebuild. Click here to check out ProX bearings and seals. Crankshaft Installation Crankshafts that utilize an interference fit with their mating crank bearings can be installed two ways. Shrinking the crankshaft in place using a combination of heating and cooling of components works well. Alternatively, utilizing a crankshaft puller is another great way to install the crankshaft. Pounding or pressing the crankshaft into place should never be considered because the trueness of the crankshaft can be affected. While your crankshaft cools in the freezer, carefully heat the inner race of the crank bearing, paying careful attention not to damage any new seals. To shrink the crankshaft in place the crankshaft should be set in a freezer for about an hour, and the inner race of the crank bearing should be carefully heated with a torch. The cautionary point here is to use care when heating if the crank seals have already been installed. Inner race temperature can be gauged by applying a drop of water to the surface of the race. If the water droplet sizzles, the inner race is plenty hot. At this point, the cooled crankshaft can be dropped through the heated bearing. Once seated, work to button up the crankcase assembly should progress quickly, and the remaining inner race can be heated and the crankcase installed. Using a crankshaft puller is an equally acceptable method and is incredibly straightforward. The puller is threaded and seats against the crank bearing or crankcase and attaches to the end of the crank via a nut or retaining ring. Once set up, the puller is tightened and the crankshaft is pulled through the bearing. Your cooled crankshaft should fit through your heated bearing fairly easily. A crank puller can be used for installation to make sure everything is square. Also, be sure to use assembly lube in critical areas during assembly. At this point, your crankcases should be buttoned up and you should be well on your way to rebuilding the rest of your engine. Upon installation of your flywheel, be sure to use a flywheel holding tool to secure it in place when torqueing the nut. Images provided and owned by Kelsey Jorissen Photography, LLC.
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