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Found 14 results

  1. Hey all, I have been waiting for this day for quite a while. I am finally able to fix my bike, i've been in debt for some time but the day has come Now i have a question, when I got my bike checked out at the shop, i was told i could rebuild my crank with any rod and bearings from 1986-2000. I am going to purchase an entire new hot rods crank instead. Am i able to order any crank from 1986-2000 for my bike? Mine is a 1987. I just want to make sure I am getting the correct part before I spend the money! Appreciate any replies or help. Thanks!!
  2. Hi guys, My friend has a 2004 kx250 and it had a rebuild by the previous owner with a wiesco bottom and numera top. The piston had some blow by but the cylinder has a lip at the top so thats not good but we took the engine apart because it seazed and had plastic on the spark plug because the rod bearing overheated and and melted the plastic on the crank so we are looking for a crank, if you know of a good one let me know but i was wondering if this would work https://www.ebay.com/itm/1993-93-KX250-KX-250-OEM-CRANKSHAFT-CRANK-MAIN-ROD-BOTTOM-END-SHAFT-13031-1347-/263548375017?fits=Model%3AKX250#viTabs_0
  3. I getting to the point where I need to replace the crank in my ‘89 Cr250. I cannot find one for that year. Are there any that will work? I saw something about a 92-01 crank but didn’t go into details.
  4. We know this is technically 'Thumper'Talk, but we also know a lot of you have 2-strokes in your garage. We want to share some tips we put together that will help you prevent and diagnose potential problems with your 2-stroke engine. Bookmark this maintenance guide to help keep your bike on the track or trail and off the bench! Article by Paul Olesen. Two-stroke engines have a storied history of being finicky beasts. If you’ve been around two-strokes for any length of time, you’ve probably heard stories that start and end to this effect: “It was running amazing...then the next thing you know - it blew”. We find these stories interesting, and empathize with the unfortunate owners or riders who tell them. At the same time, however, it is often wondered if there were any signs that could have predicted the fateful date with destruction. Photo: Steve Cox We're going to discuss and share a number of observations and diagnostic tests that can be performed to help identify whether or not your engine is going to leave you in the unfortunate role of the broken engine storyteller. While many operators are insistent that their engine gave up without warning, this is often not the case. We’ll start by going over observations that can be made with the engine running, and progress into diagnostic tests that can be routinely made to assess engine health. Recognizing Symptoms Startability Does the engine struggle to start when kicked, but is more prone to coming to life when the electric start is used or when the machine is bump started? Poor starting under normal conditions is not an inclusive sign that the engine is doomed to a spectacular failure, but it is a sign that something is amiss. Carburetion or injection issues are possible, but the bigger potential issue to be aware of resides within the cylinder. Worn piston rings can cause incomplete sealing, resulting in lower compression and more difficulty in starting. Worn piston rings or reed valves that are no longer sealing properly may be the cause of the poor startability characteristic. When the piston rings don’t seal properly, the engine doesn’t build good compression, so when kicked, the engine struggles to come to life. Similarly, if the reed petals are damaged or broken, less air will be trapped in the cylinder. Push the machine or use electric start, and the compression event is shortened via faster rotational speeds, which may be just enough to bring the engine to life. Damaged or worn out reed petals will allow air to leak out, creating less cylinder pressure and starting/running difficulties. Inconsistent Performance Does the engine struggle to hold a tune, or seem like the jetting constantly needs attention, despite relatively stable atmospheric conditions? Sporadic running is not always a death sentence, but should be investigated further. A dirty carburetor or worn spark plug can contribute to this behavior, but the problems that can lead to catastrophe are worn engine seals or gaskets. Stator side crank seals, leaking base gaskets, or intake manifold gaskets are all examples of seals that will result in air leaks which can lean out the air fuel ratio. Lean air/fuel ratios when running at full power can result in excessive combustion temperatures, which can melt a hole in the piston or seize them in the cylinder bore. Ignoring the possibility of a bad gasket or seal isn't worth the potential damage, especially with the affordability of OEM quality gasket kits from ProX. Gearbox Oil Consumption Loss of gearbox oil is abnormal, and in all cases should be able to be traced back to leaking seals or gaskets. In the unlikely event the bike tipped over or cartwheeled, gearbox oil can occasionally exit via the gearbox/crankcase breather. If the gearbox is losing oil but the leak path cannot be identified externally, there is a good chance the drive side crankshaft seal is leaking and allowing the gearbox oil to migrate into the crankcase. During the scavenging process the oil is transferred up into the combustion chamber and burned. Tracking down a leak like this and finding you need new crankshaft seals will commonly turn into a bottom end rebuild job. If you're going to tear into the bottom end to replace seals, that same amount of wear the seal experienced could be evident in other components as well, including your crankshaft and bearings. Not only does ProX make it easier to tackle a bottom end rebuild with our rebuild guide (10 Tips for a Dirt Bike Bottom End Rebuild), but one of the most recent additions to the OEM-quality replacements parts lineup are complete crankshafts. Dropping in a complete ProX crankshaft paired with a main bearing and seal kit is an affordable option for reliable performance. ProX crankshafts are assembled with double-forged, Japanese steel connecting rods, as well as Japanese big-end bearings, crank pins, and thrust washers, all manufactured by OEM suppliers. Excessive Smoke After Warm Up Since the engine is burning pre-mix oil we have to be careful here, because blueish-white smoke is a normal occurrence of two-stroke engine operation. However, excessive smoke after warm up can be an indicator of a couple problems. Blue smoke exiting the exhaust pipe after the engine has warmed may be a sign that gearbox oil is burning in the combustion chamber. While I would never encouraging sniffing your exhaust, combusted gearbox oil will have a different odor than the normal pre-mix oil the engine is using. White smoke exiting the exhaust pipe after the engine has warmed may be a sign that coolant is burning in the combustion chamber. The root of this problem is typically a leaking cylinder head gasket or o-rings. Excessive Coolant Exiting the Overflow Tube While it is common for coolant to exit the overflow tube when the bike has been tipped over or when it has overheated, it should not occur regularly. Coolant blowing out the overflow tube is another good indicator of a leaking head gasket. Note where your coolant overflow line runs, so you can keep an eye out for overheating issues. Coolant Weepage Dribbles of coolant exiting the engine around the coolant pump are indicative of a faulty water pump seal. If left unattended, the entire cooling system will eventually empty, causing overheating and an incredible amount of damage. Excessive Top End Noise Isolating top end noise in a two-stroke is easy since the only moving component is the piston assembly. Discerning what is normal takes a trained ear and familiarity with the particular engine in question. However, audible cues often present themselves when components wear or clearances loosen up. The most common noise associated with a two-stroke top end is a “metallic slap”. This is commonly referred to as piston slap, and is a result of the piston rocking back and forth in the cylinder bore as it reciprocates. This phenomena is normal, but the intensity of the slap will increase as the piston skirt and cylinder bore wear. Left unattended, excessive piston slap can result in failure of the piston skirt. Check out our complete 2-stroke top end rebuild guide here. Excessive piston slap can cause damage to the piston and weaken the skirts. It's important to check piston-to-wall clearance when installing a new piston to ensure a long operating life. 2-Stroke pistons fitted with skirt coatings also help reduce friction and operating noise. Diagnostic Checks & Tests Engine Coolant Coolant contaminated with black specks can often be traced back to a leaking head gasket or o-rings. Combustion byproducts are forced into the coolant system due to the high pressures in the combustion chamber during the combustion event. These black specks will often float and show themselves as soon as the radiator cap is removed. Gearbox Oil The composition of the gearbox oil can provide a lot of clues as to what is happening within the engine. For starters, what color is it and what is in it? Oil that appears milky is a good indicator that moisture is finding its way into the gearbox oil. The most common culprit is a faulty oil side water pump seal. A keen eye can spot various metallic particles within the oil itself. Aluminum will appear silvery gray. Bronze particles will have a gold shine. Ferrous particles will be dull and are often more discernable by dragging a magnet through the oil. Accumulation of all of these aforementioned particles will be normal in small quantities, but excessive amounts of any of them could be cause for concern. Fortunately, since gearbox and power cylinder lubrication are separate the number of causes for problems is limited and more easily pinpointed. Other than changing your gearbox oil regularly, keep an eye out for metallic particles, as those can be a sign of accelerated wear on internal parts. Cylinder Leak Down Testing While less commonly prescribed on two-stroke engines, performing a cylinder leak down test is by far one of the most definitive diagnostic procedures that can be performed to determine the health of the piston rings, cylinder bore, and cylinder head seal, whether gasket or o-rings. If any of the previously mentioned symptoms are observed, a leak down test is almost always a great next step. A leak down test pressurizes the engine’s combustion chamber and compares the amount of pressure going into the combustion chamber to the pressure that is retained. Pressurized air is administered via the spark plug hole and two pressure gauges are used to make the comparison. The piston is positioned at top dead center. Air exiting the combustion chamber can then be traced back to the piston rings or cylinder head seal. Compression Testing A compression test can be an tell-tale indicator of the health of your top end components. Be sure to compare your reading the manufacturer's recommended compression measurment. A compression test aims to quantify how much pressure builds during the compression event. A compression tester which is connected to the spark plug hole consists of a pressure gauge and a one way check valve. The engine is kicked repeatedly or turned over a number of times using the starter. The resulting pressure that is recorded can then be used to assess the health of the cylinder bore. Low pressure readings can then be attributed to problematic piston rings or leaking cylinder head seals. Crankcase Leak Down Testing A crankcase leak down test is utilized in order to assess the sealing integrity of the crankcase and cylinder. Personally, this is one of my favorite tests to perform because of its ability to isolate a number of potentially problematic seals and gaskets all at once. Components such as crank seals, base gasket, and power valve seals can all be checked to determine if they’re leaking. In summary, a crankcase leak down test is performed by sealing the intake manifold, exhaust outlet, and any power valve breathers. Then the crankcase is pressurized under low pressure. Typically, the goal is to retain the pressure in the crankcase over a set length of time. Loss of pressure is indicative of leaks, which can then be traced to their cause. Preemptively replacing components before the engine suffers a major failure is both safer and more affordable than dealing with the problem after the engine has stopped working entirely. Most problems that can occur within the two-stroke engine can be mitigated by servicing components such as pistons, rods, rings, bearings, seals, and crankshafts. Many riders dread the thought of having to service these items due to the excessively high costs associated with OEM or premium aftermarket parts. Fortunately, brands such as ProX offer a comprehensive lineup of OEM-quality components at reasonable prices, many of which are produced by OEM suppliers. Depending on what you need to service, components such as piston kits, connecting rods, crankshafts, bearings, gaskets, and seals can all be found in the ProX catalog. Replacing components as part of preventative maintenance can save time and money, especially with the availability of affordable, OEM quality parts. Find ProX parts for your machine here. Discussing specific time intervals in regards to when things should be replaced is futile. The reason is simple: different engines, maintenance practices, and applications will all have different intervals. Installing an hour meter on your engine so that you can log the number of hours the engine has run can be one of the most insightful ways to establish maintenance and replacement intervals specific to your engine, riding, and maintenance habits.
  5. Hi I have a Ktm85 2004 that is in need of a new crank, has anyone dealt with mitaka crank shafts? Or is buying a used one from ebay a good option? I want to keep the cost down. I would love to buy a hot rods but I don't have the cash. Thanks guys
  6. Wiseco's new Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits offer everything you need for a bottom and top end rebuild. From the crank to the piston kit, and even an hour meter to track maintenance, everything is included in one box. Here we take a look at the components included, and the technology behind them. So, the time has come for an engine rebuild. Hopefully it’s being done as a practice of proper maintenance, but for many it will be because of an engine failure. Whether the bottom end, top end, or both went out, the first step is to disassemble and inspect. After determining any damage done to engine cases or the cylinder, and arranging for those to be repaired/replaced, you’re faced with choosing what internal engine components to buy, where to get them, and how much the costs are going to add up. A full engine rebuild is a serious job and requires a lot of parts to be replaced, especially in four-strokes. You have to think of bottom end bearings and seals, a crankshaft assembly, piston, rings, clips, wristpin, and the plethora of gaskets required for reassembly. If you’re doing this rebuild yourself, or having your local shop do the labor, chances are you don’t have a factory team budget to spend on parts. However, you know you want high-quality and durable parts, because you don’t want to find yourself doing this again anytime soon. Rebuilding a dirt bike engine is an involved job, requiring many parts to be replaced. Missing one seal or gasket can put the whole rebuild on hold. You could source all the different parts you need from different vendors to find the best combination of quality and affordability. But, it can get frustrating when 6 different packages are coming from 6 different vendors at different times, and each one relies on the next for you to complete your rebuild. Wiseco is one of the manufacturers that has been offering top end kits (including piston, rings, clips, gaskets, and seals) all in one box, under one part number for many years. Complete bottom end rebuild kits are also available from Wiseco, with all necessary parts under one part number. So, it seemed like a no brainer to combine the top and bottom end kits, and throw in a couple extra goodies to make your complete engine rebuild in your garage as hassle free as possible. Top-end piston kits and bottom-end kits come together to create Wiseco Garage Buddy rebuild kits. Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are exactly as the name implies, the buddy you want to have in your garage that has everything ready to go for your engine rebuild. Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits come with all parts needed to rebuild the bottom and top end, plus an hour meter—with a Garage Buddy specific decal—to track critical maintenance intervals and identify your rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. The kits include: Crankshaft assembly OEM quality main bearings All engine gaskets, seals, and O-rings Wiseco standard series forged piston kit (piston, ring(s), pin, clips) Small end bearing (for two-strokes) Cam chain (for four-strokes) Hour meter with mounting bracket and hour meter decal Open up a Garage Buddy kit, and you'll find all the components you need to rebuild your bottom and top end. 2-stroke and 4-stroke Whether your machine of choice is a 2-stroke or a 4-stroke, Wiseco can help you with your rebuild. 2-stroke Wiseco Garage Buddy kits include everything listed above, featuring a Wiseco forged Pro-Lite piston kit. You don’t even have to worry about sourcing a small-end bearing, that’s included too. 2-stroke fans often brag about the ability to rebuild their bikes so much cheaper than their 4-stroke counterparts, and they’ll have even more ammo for bragging now with these kits starting in the $400 range. A Wiseco 2-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, plus an hour meter to track your next maintenance intervals. However, don’t abandon your 4-stroke yet. Many riders cringe—and rightfully so—at the thought of rebuilding their 4-stroke because of the costs associated, but Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kits starting in the $600s takes a lot of sting off your rebuild project. They even include a new timing chain. No matter what you’re rebuilding, you’ll be able to track key maintenance intervals for your fresh engine with the Wiseco hour meter and log book that’s included in the Garage Buddy kits. All Garage Buddy kits include a specific hour meter decal as well, which is important for the limited warranty to identify the rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. A Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, including a cam chain and an hour meter. Ease of ordering Wiseco Garage Buddy kits come with the listed parts boxed up in one box, and listed under one part number, which makes it nice to not have to worry about if you might’ve missed something when ordering. Simply find the single part number for your model, order, and you’re on your way to brand new performance. Quality Performance, backed by a Limited Warranty Ordering convenience doesn’t make a difference if the parts do not provide quality and reliability. Wiseco crankshafts are designed completely by in-house engineers, who determine all assembled dimensions, clearances, materials, and specifications. These specifications have been determined from R&D tests such as hand inspection, dyno, and failure analysis. Once Wiseco cranks have been manufactured to exact specifications they are batch inspected, and critical tolerances and dimensions are measured. Major inspections and tests include crank run-out and trueness, because they must operate within a strict tolerance to last long and perform well. Wiseco crankshafts and bearings are manufactured and tested according to strict tolerances and clearances, including run-out and trueness. Crankshaft designs are also tested for 4 hours at WOT. Bearings are another critical point of inspection. Wiseco has worked to build relationships with top-tier bearing suppliers to provide a long lasting, low-friction product. Debris in a bearing can lead to very fast wear, and Wiseco makes it a point to inspect batches of bearings for cleanliness and proper operation. As part of the design and engineering process, prototype crankshafts are hand inspected and dyno-tested at wide open throttle for 4 consecutive hours. This is a benchmark test, and new crankshaft designs must pass it before to be deemed worthy for manufacturing. Watch our crank R&D and inspection process. A Warranty on Engine Internals? Yes! Wiseco is committed to providing performance and reliability in all their products. This is why Garage Buddy kits come with a limited warranty. Rebuild your engine with a Garage Buddy kit, and your new Wiseco components are covered against manufacturer defects for 90 days from the date of purchase, or 10 hours logged on the hour meter, whichever comes first. Check out all the warranty details on the detail sheet in your new Garage Buddy kit. Open up your Garage Buddy kit and you'll find a detail sheet on the warranty on your new components. Forged Pistons The top end kits included in Garage Buddy kits feature a Wiseco forged piston, which are designed, forged, and machined completely in-house in the U.S.A. Four-stroke Garage Buddy kits come with a Wiseco standard forged piston, which offers stock compression and more reliability and longevity, thanks to the benefits of the forging process. Two-stroke Garage Buddy kits include a Wiseco Pro-Lite forged piston, which is the two-stroke piston that has been providing two-stroke riders quality and reliability for decades. Some applications, two and four-stroke, even feature ArmorGlide skirt coating, reducing friction and wear for the life of the piston. Forged aluminum has an undeniable advantage in strength over cast pistons, thanks to the high tensile strength qualities of aluminum with aligned grain flow. Read more about our forging process here, and get all the details on our coatings here. All Wiseco pistons are forged in-house from aluminum. Some pistons may also come with ArmorGlide skirt coating, and some 2-stroke pistons may already have exhaust bridge lubrication holes pre-drilled. All pistons are machined on state-of-the-art CNC machine equipment, then hand finished and inspected for quality. The forged pistons come complete with wrist pin, clips, and high-performance ring(s). Lastly, all gaskets and seals are made by OEM quality manufactures. Sealing components are not something to ever go cheap on, because no matter how high-quality your moving components are, if your engine is not sealing properly, it’s coming back apart. Need some tips on breaking in your fresh engine? Check this out. Gaskets and seals provided in Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are OEM quality, ensuring your freshly rebuilt engine is properly sealed.
  7. Are there any go-to parts places for these old kdx's? Or anybody that you guys recommend I send my cylinder too? I traded my old kz550 for this kdx last week and the only reason I agreed to the trade was because the kdx supposedly had a brand new crank and top end with low hours on it. It ran good enough to make the trade and had great compression, just needed some carb tuning, it had a good knock to it but everywhere I researched said that its normal and it's only the kipps valves. As soon as I got the carb lined out, the con rod bearing went out, taking my piston and cylinder with it.. idk why it failed, con rod says "royal" on it but other than that, idk what brand any of the parts used are. Havent dug too deep yet. Just want to get it running as cheap as I can since I traded off a dang nice bike for this thing and now I'm kicking myself for doing so.. I have to many project bikes and I really didnt think I was getting another one.
  8. Im rebuilding my 2000 drz's lower. It didnt have many miles on it aka 1500, but my crankshaft bearing is out and i need to replace it amd dont have the tools to change just the bearing. I was curious what brand yall would recommend the hotrods ive heard good and bad mixes. Please if you've replaced a crankshaft or know a reliable brand let me know. Thank you for your time. A.C. DrzFlorencybell
  9. It's no secret Wiseco's crankshaft assemblies experienced some growing pains early on, but various supplier and material actions have been taken and quality control processes put in place to make sure Wiseco bottom end kits make your rebuild easy and reliable. See what has been done for Wiseco's crankshaft line here. Whether you ride a dirt bike, ATV, or any other powersports machine, the time for a bottom end freshening up will come. Hopefully it doesn’t come because of a crankshaft failure, but we all know sometimes stuff happens. Regardless of the reason you’re rebuilding your bottom end, ordering durable parts and having everything you need makes it a lot easier on your mind and your wallet. An extensive process of designing, engineering, quality control, and benchmarking goes into every Wiseco bottom end rebuild kit. Wiseco’s bottom end kits consist of the crankshaft itself, a bottom end gasket and seal kit, and main bearings. Each application has one part number for the complete kit, making it simple and easy for the customer. Finding individual part numbers for all the seals, bearings, and gaskets you need can be a pain. We think receiving everything in one full bottom end kit is much easier. Research and Development Wiseco’s engineering staff is responsible for the complete design of all Wiseco crankshafts, including all assembled dimensions, clearances, materials, and specifications. During the research and development process, the engineering team will first examine the OEM crankshaft. They will take numerous measurements of lengths, widths, thicknesses, tolerances, and clearances. OEM crankshafts will be put through this testing process first, allowing engineers to determine where there are weaknesses in those crankshafts so they can tailor their designs to improve upon those areas. The first step in crankshaft reliability is using properly treated materials. One critical component of all Wiseco crankshafts is properly treated materials. Crankshaft webs and connecting rods are double forged for strength, and then put through heat treatment. Proper heat treatment on connecting rods and main webs of crankshafts normalizes the materials and is essential to wear resistance because it prepares the metal for the heat and stress conditions experienced during engine operation. Without this process, the rod and crank webs could have inconsistent qualities and weak spots. If the crank components don’t have the lowest friction and best possible wear protection, some or all of the affected crankshaft components could fail, which is almost always catastrophic for the entire engine. Also included are low friction bearings. Optimally located rod oil slots help keep these low friction bearings properly lubricated. A main bearing that spins smoothly and easily while also operating within strict tolerances is important to allow your engine to perform quietly and efficiently, without any accelerated wear from operation outside of tolerances. Keeping crank bearings properly lubricated and free of debris is essential to crankshaft function. Before designs are finalized, crankshafts are installed in a motor and tested at wide open throttle for 4 hours. If a crank or any part of it does not last for the entire 4 hours, the engineers will reexamine and redesign any parts needed. When the crank lasts the full 4 hours, it is next inspected for signs of high wear resistance, so Wiseco can be sure the crankshafts will have many hours of service life. Testing and Quality Control The first step in the quality control process for the crankshafts is ensuring consistent quality across every part that comes in. Wiseco has created close relationships with their material and parts suppliers to make sure that each and every part going into their cranks meets strict quality standards. A great example of the importance of working with suppliers is the big end bearings used in Wiseco crankshaft assemblies. Cleanliness of the bottom end bearings is a major factor in proper crank operation. If there is any debris from manufacturing in a main bearing, wear on the bearing will be accelerated, leading to bearing failure, and ultimately, crank failure. Adequate filtration systems and processes have been put in place with the supplier to make sure debris is taken care of right away. Individual inspection and initial testing steps are also taken by the supplier to assure quality begins at the source. Quality control steps for cleanliness, material, and operation start at the supplier, and don't end until everything is boxed up and ready to ship. The next step in the crankshaft assembly after parts are received from suppliers is to thoroughly hand-inspect for any imperfections or dimensions outside of Wiseco’s specifications. According to Wiseco's Director of Powersports, Scott Highland, “A sample group from each incoming shipment is fully inspected in our engineering lab prior to being placed in inventory to be sold. Inspection is fully dimensional, and all data is recorded and compared to standards for each specific crankshaft.” Crankshaft pieces that pass inspections are then used to assemble the crankshafts themselves, then sent off for further testing. The assembled cranks are first tested for any operation that runs outside of specified tolerances. This is referred to as testing the crank for trueness. If there are any that are found to not operate completely within the specified tolerances, they will not be used. Crankshafts are individually measured and inspected to make sure all critical dimensions are met. Scott Highland comments, “Inspecting crankshaft run-out, or trueness, is critical to the crankshaft running smoothly in the engine with less vibration and improved main bearing wear.” Any part that is not in compliance will be recorded and scrapped. OEM Following the Aftermarket Back when Honda was still making the good old 2-strokes, there were certain model years that had what the powersports industry refers to as the “tin can” design for the crankshaft. What this nick name refers to is the web of the crankshaft -- which is the section that houses the main bearing and shaft -- had a surrounding metal piece that resembled somewhat of a tin can. The connecting rod would rotate on the main bearing through the middle of this “tin can.” The natural highly repetitive motion of the crankshaft would cause a great deal of fatigue on the tin can, which ultimately resulted in the metal fracturing and metal fragments falling into the crankshaft. Wiseco created a newly designed crankshaft for the CR250R models that came with the faulty “tin can.” Their new design scrapped the tin can structure and utilized more conventional plastic stuffers that were much more resistant to wear, drastically reducing the chance of bottom end failure. After endurance testing, it proved to be a worthy design. In fact, the new design worked so much better that Honda later started using a similarly designed crankshaft with plastic stuffers instead of the old faulty design. It’s always a good idea to inspect the bottom end components of your machine and replace as needed according to your manufacturers suggestions. Ordering one bottom end kit from Wiseco and receiving everything you need at a fair price makes the first steps of your rebuild a whole lot easier.
  10. Hey guys I got a 2013 ktm 250xc I just changed a crankshaft seal so I figured why not change the clutch pack while i had it apart so long story short after i put the clutch assembly back togather with the bolts torqued to spec I decided to pull the clutch lever to make sure the action was correct, I noticed only one side of the clutch pack was disengaging. Also I noticed it was was always the side with the x y z adjustment holes. I then took it apart and put it back together two more times to make sure I did it right and didn't miss any steps same result then decided to start the bike up and see if the clutch would even work and basically it didn't disengage fully then I took it back apart and removed the clutch basket and everything and put it back together following all the instructions same result whether it was on x y or z setting. Not really sure what else to do at this point anyone have similar problems or know what else I should check ? Also thinking about taking apart the slave to make sure i didn't dislodge any small parts
  11. I have an 01 ttr125 and the connector rod seems melted to the crankshaft LOL. it won’t move. I broke my flywheel trying to get to it. Well, everything is removed from the cases and I need a new crankshaft. I need a new flywheel too but they seem easy enough to find. I AM having trouble finding a crankshaft with connector rod though. This is my first time rebuilding a motor. Shit. It’s my first Dirtbike. Yikes. I was considering getting a whole bottom end rebuild kit. But they are also seemingly hard to find for this year and model. I will need new gaskets for top end but that is all. I didn’t notice any gaskets on bottom end. I don’t think it’s ever been taken apart, judging by how hard it was to get the flywheel and crankshaft off. Is it normal for it to not have any gaskets if it’s never been opened? Please help guys. I know I have a lot of questions. Sorry.
  12. So I'm rebuilding my 2001 yz 250f engine. I'm gonna go ahead and get the wiseco bottom and top end rebuild kit for the 2003 model. What else is a must do when converting the bottom end to the 2003. I've read something about the exhaust cam and the stator size, but are those must do's? I'm really trying to not spend too much. Thanks in advance!
  13. Hey guys, I have a 2001 RM250 that im in the process of rebuilding. I bought what I thought was a crank out of a 2001 model; however it is not. Turns out it is a 2003 RM250 crank and I have already installed it. Seems to fit the same the only diffenence seems to be the crank gear. Can anyone confirm this? Also would I be able to just put a 2003 crank gear in and roll with it? Any help is appreciated and thanks in advance!
  14. Many riders associate the need for a bottom end rebuild with a costly trip to the shop. However, saving on labor and parts isn't out of the question with the help of ProX. We put together a list of 10 tips to help those who want to tackle the rebuild themselves. Rebuilding the bottom end of your engine, whether two or four-stroke, can be a fun and rewarding job. Additionally, a considerable amount of money can be saved by taking on the work yourself versus tasking a shop to perform the work. These statements are only true, however, assuming the bottom end rebuild is performed correctly. This is a huge caveat, and for the average weekend warrior who doesn’t perform this task often, unfamiliarity with technique and componentry can lead to errors. To help ensure your next bottom end rebuild is executed to a professional level, here’s 10 tips which will elevate your confidence and understanding as an amateur engine builder. The tips will be presented in chronological order. Let’s get started! Rebuilding the bottom end yourself can be a daunting, yet rewarding, task. Just make sure you take the engine out of the frame first! Correct Tools, Correct Diagnostics, Correct Expectations, Correct Replacement Components Successfully rebuilding your bottom end starts with planning and preparation. Starting with tools, you’ll need a few specialty tools in conjunction with your standard sockets, wrenches, etc. Namely, the correct flywheel puller for your specific engine, a flywheel holding tool, a crankcase splitting tool, a blind bearing puller, and a crankshaft puller. Using heat to assist in removal/installation of the bearings and crankshaft is an effective method, so an oven and freezer are also noteworthy items. You need to have a copy of the factory service manual or equivalent for your particular vehicle. I highly recommend reviewing the sequence of events and procedure in advance of executing the work. If you are rebuilding the bottom end because of a failure, be sure to inspect all components to identify the cause of the failure and determine what was damaged. This will ensure your rebuilt engine will not encounter the same problem. Bottom ends are taken apart for many different reasons. If a major failure occurred, the scrutiny of the rebuild will be at a much higher level than a bottom end that is merely being reconditioned. If any problems were persistent when the machine was operated, such as a poorly shifting gearbox, or leaks between the crankcases, the causation of these issues must be identified prior to reassembly. Replacement components are a major factor to consider, both in terms of cost and engine performance, when diving into a bottom end rebuild. Replacing bearings, seals, gaskets, and refurbishing the crankshaft either by rebuilding or replacing it is essential. It’s recommended to peruse your service manual or microfiches ahead of the rebuild to generate a list of replacement components. Selection of components and sourcing them should also be planned out. In addition to OEM options, brands such as ProX offer OEM quality parts at more affordable prices. Complete crankshafts, connecting rod kits, bearings, seals, and many other components can be found for a wide variety of engine models that can make the rebuilding process easy and affordable. All ProX bottom end parts are made by OE manufacturers and suppliers to OE standards, so your mind can rest easy that your rebuild can retain OEM quality and longevity. Click here to see more about ProX drop-in ready complete crankshafts. ProX bottom end components are manufactured by OE suppliers to OE specifications. Crankshafts, gaskets, seals, and bearings are available to cover your bottom end rebuild with OEM reliability and performance. Find all the OEM replacement parts you need for your bike here. Keeping Track of Hardware As the engine is torn apart, you will amass a significant number of components, bolts, nuts, and miscellaneous hardware. Properly keeping track of these items is critical. I prefer to lay sub-systems out on a large table, remove the bare minimum of components/hardware to get to the items I’m servicing, and stick bolts through cardboard in the pattern they were removed from components (think crankcases and covers). This methodology reduces the number of mixups that can occur and ensures bolts of varying length will be reinstalled in their original location. While my method is far from the only one, make sure you have a robust and sustainable system for keeping track of everything. Flywheel Removal Commonly, two specialty tools are required to remove the flywheel - a flywheel puller and a flywheel holder. It is imperative that both are utilized. Many rebuilds have gone awry because a flywheel holding tool was not used during the rebuild. Instead, the crankshaft was secured from the primary drive side when the flywheel nut was removed/installed. At face value, this may not seem like a big deal, however, when the flywheel is removed, or more importantly installed, in this fashion, a torque is exerted across the crankshaft. While it may seem implausible, the twisting force that is exerted can actually alter the trueness of the crankshaft. Using proper tools is critical. Pictured here is a clutch holder, used in aiding in clutch component removal, which also doubles as a flywheel holder. The small dowels on the back of the arms of the tool sit inside the recesses in the flywheel to hold it in place while removing the flywheel. Crankcase Separation There are a few noteworthy items to discuss when separating the crankcases. First off, I always recommend blocking the crankcases so that the split line lies horizontally, and confirming which side should be oriented face up. Doing this will reduce the likelihood of components falling out and ensure that subsequent removal of components goes smoothly. When installing the crankcase splitter, make sure a protective cap is used to cover the end of the crankshaft. This applies to both two and four-strokes, but is especially critical on four-stroke engines that pass oil out the end of the crankshaft. Be sure to position the crankcase splitter arms as close to equispaced from one another as possible. Also, ensure that the splitter studs utilize thread engagement at least 1.5 times the diameter of the bolt. For example, most crankcase bolt holes are 6mm, so the stud should be screwed down at least 9mm to ensure adequate thread engagement. Removing the crank after the cases have been split is another critical job that requiring a special tool. We always recommend using a crank puller. The puller can also be used to install the crankshaft. Once the crankcase splitter is set up, it is imperative that separation happens evenly around the periphery of the crankcases. Screwdrivers and the like should never be used to facilitate separation. Instead, a rubber mallet can be used to encourage separation. Seal and Bearing Removal The use of seal pullers to facilitate seal removal is not completely necessary, but is definitely recommended. Their use reduces the likelihood of bore damage during removal. Bearing removal can be done with or without heat. However, the former seems to be a better method. Using heat to remove the crankcase bearings reduces bearing bore wear and work on part of the rebuilder. I do want to note that your heat source and surrounding area can become odorous due to the residual oils that become heated during the process. For this reason, it is advisable to thoroughly clean the crankcases prior to heating them up, as well as keeping ventilation in mind. After heating the crankcase halves, use a hammer and punch to remove any bearings that did not come out on their own. Be careful not to damage the bearing bores when doing this. To remove the bearings by heating the crankcase halves, position the crankcase halves split line down on a pair of trays. The trays will catch the bearings and any oil that did not get cleaned out. The oven, grill, or heat source should be set at 350 degrees Farenheit, and the crankcases should be heated for around half an hour. After, the majority of the crankcase bearings should fall out of their bores. Any bearings that did not drop out should be carefully tapped out with a punch and hammer. Bearings situated in blind bearing bores that did not fall out should be removed with the assistance of a blind bearing puller. If you do not want to or can’t use the heating method to remove the bearings, an arbor or hydraulic press may be utilized to aid in removal. A blind bearing puller will also have to be heavily relied on to facilitate removal. Due to the unevenness of load distribution that can result from pounding the bearings out with a hammer, we caution against this as a primary form of removal without the aid of heat. Cleaning, Case, and Component Inspection At this point, it is my recommendation that all components that originated inside the crankcases be thoroughly cleaned. Clean components will ensure easy and accurate inspections. On four-stroke engines that have oil passages running through the crankcases, cylinder, and cylinder head, it is imperative that these are cleaned and blown out. This is especially true if the engine suffered a major failure where oil contamination was a resulting issue. Similarly, on two-strokes, the passages that lead to the crank bearings should be cleaned. Component inspections should be conducted to assess the condition of the gearbox, crankcase bearing bores, and crankshaft. The crankshaft should either be rebuilt or replaced depending on the severity of wear and desires of the builder. Should you determine you'd like to rebuild your crank, ProX offers OEM quality connecting rod kits that can be used for a crankshaft rebuild. Unless you are experienced in this field and have the tools, crankshaft rebuilds should be trusted in the hands of a reputable shop. ProX connecting rods are double-forged, Japanese steel, and are heat treated and shot peened for strength and longevity. Read about the advtantages of ProX connecting rods here. Crankshaft Trueness Regardless of whether a new or rebuilt crankshaft is utilized, the trueness of the crankshaft must be checked. This can be farmed out to a competent shop, machinist, or if properly equipped, performed in-house. While it should normally be expected that new or rebuilt cranks are within runout specifications, the trueness of the crankshaft is imperative to long-term durability. Checking is insurance that our postal system didn’t drop your crank, and that the factory or rebuilder did their job correctly. Bearing Installation Similar to removal, heat can also aid in bearing installation. The same heating recommendations apply, and once at temperature, the majority of the bearings should fall to the bottom of their bores without any input. The caveat to this is the bearing dropping into the bore cock-eyed. When this happens, a punch and hammer should be used be help square the bearing to its bore. Be sure to tap on the outer race of the bearing. To ensure the bearings are at the bottom of their bores, they should be tapped to confirm they are fully seated. Bearings should be tapped on their outer races only to make sure they are completely and squarley seated in their bores. Alternatively, if you don’t want to, or can’t use heat, an arbor or hydraulic press should be utilized to install the bearings. Be sure to load the bearings through their outer races when pressing them in place. Seal Installation Seals can be tapped into place with a seal driver or socket and hammer. Alternatively, a press can be used. The important checks to perform are to ensure the seals have been installed squarely in their respective bores, and at any prescribed depths outlined in the service manual. Any seals installed cock-eyed will wear out prematurely. When installing new seals, make sure they are completely seated by using a seal driver or socket and hammer. Use caution and make sure the tools don't come in contact with anything but the seal. To prepare for the new bearing and seal installation, complete crankshaft bearing and seal kits are available through ProX. ProX uses reputable, OEM bearing and seal suppliers for all parts in order to maintain OEM quality. Ordering in kits creates less hassle and is a budget-friendly step in your rebuild. Click here to check out ProX bearings and seals. Crankshaft Installation Crankshafts that utilize an interference fit with their mating crank bearings can be installed two ways. Shrinking the crankshaft in place using a combination of heating and cooling of components works well. Alternatively, utilizing a crankshaft puller is another great way to install the crankshaft. Pounding or pressing the crankshaft into place should never be considered because the trueness of the crankshaft can be affected. While your crankshaft cools in the freezer, carefully heat the inner race of the crank bearing, paying careful attention not to damage any new seals. To shrink the crankshaft in place the crankshaft should be set in a freezer for about an hour, and the inner race of the crank bearing should be carefully heated with a torch. The cautionary point here is to use care when heating if the crank seals have already been installed. Inner race temperature can be gauged by applying a drop of water to the surface of the race. If the water droplet sizzles, the inner race is plenty hot. At this point, the cooled crankshaft can be dropped through the heated bearing. Once seated, work to button up the crankcase assembly should progress quickly, and the remaining inner race can be heated and the crankcase installed. Using a crankshaft puller is an equally acceptable method and is incredibly straightforward. The puller is threaded and seats against the crank bearing or crankcase and attaches to the end of the crank via a nut or retaining ring. Once set up, the puller is tightened and the crankshaft is pulled through the bearing. Your cooled crankshaft should fit through your heated bearing fairly easily. A crank puller can be used for installation to make sure everything is square. Also, be sure to use assembly lube in critical areas during assembly. At this point, your crankcases should be buttoned up and you should be well on your way to rebuilding the rest of your engine. Upon installation of your flywheel, be sure to use a flywheel holding tool to secure it in place when torqueing the nut. Images provided and owned by Kelsey Jorissen Photography, LLC.
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