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Found 1,163 results

  1. How to properly measure a cylinder for a top end rebuild. This applies to 2 and 4 stroke motorcycles. With just a few simple specialty tools you can measure your cylinder and small end rod to evaluate if your parts are usable or need a trip to the machine shop. This video will give an overview of the tools required and how to do the job. First and foremost a service manual for the bike/engine is required before attempting. This is just one of many measurements that must be done before ordering parts for a top end rebuild.
  2. After experiencing some overheating while going slow in rough terrain I decided to try a cheap fix and install a couple of cooling fans. Here are some photos of my fan installation. The fans are not sealed but since they are brush-less DC fans, unless some debris gets in them they should not be affected by the environment. The fans are fairly inexpensive draw very little current and easy to replace if they fail. The fans are held on the radiator by zip ties. I inserted one zip tie through each of the radiator side mounting holes of the fan then passed the zip ties through the fins if the radiator and secured them with the clipped-off head of another zip tie. The 2006 250 xc-w does not appear to have a 12vdc circuit. It does have an output from the generator that I assume is alternating current. Since the stock regulator only has one wire going to it and ground on the other side I suspect is just a zener diode, that acts as a voltage limiter shunting anything over a certain voltage to ground. If that is the case the AC generator output would be fine for lights and a horn, but not a Direct Current Fan. I installed a inexpensive (cheap) aftermarket regulator/rectifier, inserting it between the generator and the rest of the KTM's electrical circuit. You can see the voltage regulator in the attached photos. The regulator/rectifier provides 12vdc to the fans, horn, lights and the battery. The battery pack is a ni-mh 1800 mha 12vdc, NOT lithium-ion. I opted for the ni-mh because there is less of a fire hazard in-case the voltage regulator goes nuts. The battery is connected to the rest of the circuit with a 7.5 amp fuse and is intended to act as a voltage conditioner. If the voltage provided by the regulator has any rpm related spikes, or dips, the battery should absorb the spikes by charging, and fill any dips by discharging. Or at least that's the plan. The battery also powers the fans if the radiators are still hot when the engine is not running. The fans are activated by an appliance thermo-snap switch. This switch is a normally open bi-metal switch that closes at 85c (185f). It is designed to switch 120vac at 8 amps. That is an order of magnitude more current then the fans require, so they are not likely to fail due to current draw. If it fails it will probably be a result of exceeding the cycle life of the switch and I have NO idea of how many cycles to failure this switch is rated for. It is attached to the radiator just below the radiator cap near the hot coolant in hose using JB weld epoxy adhesive. The switch activates after the stock thermostat opens fully and the coolant temp at the top of the radiator exceeds 85c. Since installing the fans, a coolant recovery bottle and a 1.8 bar radiator cap, even though I have been riding harder, I have not experienced any steam from overheating. I have seen the coolant recovery bottle over half full. So the cooling system with the fans running has gotten hot enough to overpressure the 1.8 bar radiator cap and over flow coolant into the recovery bottle, but it did not over flow the bottle, and all of the coolant was returned to the radiator as soon as the bike cooled. The fact that the coolant bottle did have coolant overflow in it is proof that the fans and 1.8 bar radiator cap are not a total cure to overheating. Though as I said overheating has happened far fewer times even though I'm riding more and harder than last year. The thermo-snap switch ensures that the whole system is automatic requiring no input from the rider. The fans turn on and off according to radiator temperature whether the engine is running or not. The fan system weighs less than 1 kg (2 lbs). All in all I am very satisfied with the way it works. I know the wiring is a rats nest. It was pretty much a proof of concept job. My son was going to clean it up and give it a more professional look, but I haven't gotten it over to him yet (1year+) >>> See my coolant recovery bottle system HERE.
  3. I did the fix last night and took some pics and notes to make this easy on people that haven't done it and want more detail. Please chime in if you think I've missed something. Required Tools: Set of Allen wrenches #3 Phillips screwdriver small flat head screwdriver 8 & 10 mm sockets 13 mm open end wrench (I needed this to remove my skid plate) snap ring pliers gasket scraper compressed air Required Parts: New clutch cover gasket, Suzuki Part # 11482-29F00 Tube or can of RTV sealant Oil filter and oil (if you plan to change the oil) 1. Remove your skid plate (if you have one). I have a Tonn's skid plate and it was in the way. 2. Remove right side radiator cover. 3. Unbolt the rear brake lever. This will require removing a cotter pin on the backside of the bolt, and then the bolt itself. I was able to swing the lever far enough out of the way without completely removing it from the bike (see pic). 4. Drain the coolant. This requires removing the radiator cap and the small bolt on the water pump, which has an aluminum washer on it. I rocked the bike from side to side to get most of the coolant out of the bike. 5. The oil, two options here. You can either drain the oil and remove the oil filter or you can do what I did which is lay the bike on its left side to keep the oil from pouring out of the engine when you remove the clutch cover. I still removed the oil filter so I could clean the clutch cover with brake clean after scraping the old gasket off. 6. Loosen the hose clamp on the coolant hose that attaches to the top of the water pump and fold the hose out of the way. 7. Remove the water pump cover and the clutch cover by removing the bolts holding them on. Note that some of the bolts are of different sizes so keep track of which hole you pulled them from. Also, not all of the bolts need be removed, see the pic below. 8. Remove the old gasket from the clutch cover and/or the engine with your gasket scraper. I then cleaned the clutch cover with brake cleaner as it was fairly oily. 9. With your snap ring pliers, remove the snap ring from the plastic gear on the clutch cover seen here: 10. Remove the plastic gear. 11. Push out the metal pin and remove the washer underneath as seen here: 12. With a screwdriver or whatever your preferred tool, remove the “E” clip as seen here: 13. After removing the “E” clip push the water pump shaft out of the clutch cover. 14. You will now have the part in your hand that needs fixing. Remove the porcelain gasket at the bottom of the shaft by blowing it with compressed air. Don’t not pry it with a screwdriver as it could damage the gasket. Mine was stuck fairly well so I sprayed some WD-40 on first to loosen it up. 15. If you used WD-40 clean the shaft and gasket with some brake cleaner and then apply the RTV sealant to this area (I reused this pic as its perfect): 16. Push the gasket back down flush on the shaft wiping away any excess RTV that may flow out. 17. Reassemble the shaft into the clutch cover in reverse order as listed in steps 9-13. 18. Place your new clutch cover gasket on the engine and then place the cover back onto the bike. 19. Put the bolts back into the clutch and water pump cover and tighten equally. I could not find a torque setting for these in the manual so I snugged them evenly. 20. Put the oil filter or a new one in the bike and put the oil filter cover back on. 21. Re-attach the brake lever and tighten the bolt to 21 ft lbs. Be sure to install a new cotter pin on the backside of the bolt. 22. If you drained your oil, refill the crankcase with the proper amount. If you didn’t drain the oil be sure you have enough in the crankcase from oil lost from removing the clutch cover. 23. Let bike sit for 24 hours to let the RTV set up before adding coolant. 24. Re-attach the coolant hose to the top of the water pump and tighten the hose clamp. 25. Fill the radiator with a “Silicate Free” anti-freeze and put the radiator cap back on and tighten the radiator cap screw. 26. Put the radiator cover and your skid plate back on the bike. 27. You are done, go ride!
  4. You are going to hear 30 different ways to break it in, because there are different ways for different people. That being said, here is my method I have used for all 7 smoker motors I've rebuilt. Pre-Notes: *DO NOT use a synthetic blend oil for break in! A castor based oil is my weapon of choice. I use Castor 927 in two strokes. *Remember, you WANT A LOAD on the piston the break it in! The "idling" theory does not put the proper load needed to seat the rings and seal it up. The "idling" method I can't undernstand. My trick is the heat cycle break-in, 3 times. *1st cycle: Ride the bike. Go NO MORE than 1/2 throttle, with NO hard accelaration. Ride the bike until it is to operating temperature like normal, then park it. Wait until it is cool to the touch (on the pipes/radiators). You want the motor 'ice cold', not warm. *2nd cycle: Take the bike out again, this time go NO MORE than 3/4 throttle. Go through all the gears, NOT WINDING it out- short shift. Stay away from hard accelartation. Get it to running temp, and park it again. Wait for it to cool down a second time. *3rd cycle: Take the bike out, this time go through ALL the gears, but don't bring it to redline. You can go as hard as you want in any gear, but don't hit the revv limiter. Get to operating temp, and park it. Let it cool down one last time. After it is cooled down the 3rd and final time, take it out and tear it up. Like I said, you will hear X different ways for break in, but this is my choice. I have 7 rebuilds, ranging from rings, to piston and rings, to cranks, seals, etc. and not once ever had a problem.
  5. So, many of you in the dirt bike scene are aware that Rekluse makes automatic clutches. The reviews on these clutches, if properly setup, have been simply awesome. Well, I must agree, they are simply awesome. I did a lot of research on this clutch before I put down the money for this clutch. Was it worth it? Absolutely! During my installation process, I took a few pictures to help anybody else who is interested in this type of clutch. Here are a few of the basic tools you will need to get the clutch installed. What you don't see in the picture (yes, I'll need to get it updated) is a dental pic tool. These are really handy when you are trying to pull the clutch packs out. Yes, it can be done with a flat tip screwdriver, but its much easier with the right tool. Here is a close up picture of the cable operated clutch actuator that sits on top of the case. Mine was kinda dirty due to a leaking seal on the front sprocket. So, lay the bike on its left side. I believe the instructions call for you to drain the oil. In my case, I didn't need to do that, as the oil moved to the low side of the case. Don't forget to remove the pin on the back side of the bolt that holds the rear brake pedal on. I though I would show you the differences in the bolt sizes for the crank case cover. The two larger ones are the same size, and then there is a 3rd one that goes with the centering pin, which is a little longer than the other 4 shorter bolts. I have never delved into the motorcycles mechanics before. However, as you can see from my web site, I'm no rookie to handling sockets. These pics are for the person who has the bike, but has yet to do any real maintenance on their bike. Here is a shot of inside the clutch cover. Here you can see the friction plates stacked up. At first, I put tape down to seal off the rest of the case from clutch. However, I found that the tape would stick to the clutch boss, and the make getting the friction plates out a little more difficult. I then moved to the back up plan; terry cloths. These worked quite well, and I was able to seal up the gaps very well. Here you can see the clutch springs coming out. These won't be used anymore. However, don't throw them away. You may end up selling the bike down the road and may want to keep your Rekluse. Here is a shot of the clutch boss and the friction plates. Here you can see the centering pins going into the clutch boss. Look closely, you can see 4 very small washers that are sitting around each centering pin. These washers are very small, don't loose them. I had, lots, and lots of washer left over. Don't be surprised. It appeared that they give you a generic bag of parts, and you use what you need from the bag. Here is the heart of the Rekluse. Here is something I found interesting, and nearly put a stop to my whole setup. Notice how the centering pins don't pass through the Rotating Hub Assembly. I was a little concerned when I came across this. However, rotate the holes one more to the left or right, and the Assembly falls right into place. Rotating Hub Assembly in place. Here the Pressure Plate and Ball Bearings are being installed. You may be wondering if I put any oil on the bearings before I installed the Top Plate. Actually, I installed the parts to make sure it would all go together correctly, then I took it apart, lubed it as necessary, then put it back together for the final install. Next, the top plate is being installed. Just about done. Rekluse states that if you don't use their gasket, serious damage can occur. I noticed that their gasket is quite a bit thicker than the stock gasket. Next up, I went through the break in procedure. Fortunately, it was a work day for most folks, so many people in my neighborhood were at work and didn't complain about me racing up and down the street. Because I installed new Friction Plates, Rekluse recommends that you check the gap between the top Friction Plate and Drive Plate. When I put it all together the 1st time, it was dead on. After the break in, the gap spread to the maximum allowed. So, I used another one of the Rekluse Drive Plates in place of one of my stock drive plates. Yes, you need to get back into the case, replace the Drive Plate, remeasure the gap, use Loctite again and put it all back again. But in light of the cost of this unit, and the simple 10 minutes it takes, its well worth it to ensure you have the right gap. I rode the bike the very next day on some tight trails for a straight 4.5 hours. The clutch performed flawlessly. I never had an issue with the bike stalling. In fact, I noticed that when I started the bike in neutral, and then put it in 1st gear, the bike didn't move as much as it did when I had a standard cable clutch. Well worth the money, and when properly setup, performs awesomely. As noted above, I'm no stranger to sockets and working on vehicles. I've redone my own suspension on the rear of my 4Runner. I designed and built my 3-link setup on my 4Runner, and created a vehicle that can rock crawl the extreme trails, and yet cruise on the highway at 80mph in comfort. I am very cautious when doing something for the first time, so it aways takes a bit more time. For somebody who has never done this before, give yourself about 4 hours. I had to crack the case twice to add a thicker drive plate to bring the gap tolerances back into spec. But, its better to do it right the first time and not have problems down the trail.
  6. More than you wanted to know about Liquid Engine Cooling Liquid cooling is an often overlooked part of an engine's operation. If it's not overheating then everything's good. The problem is that, when trouble does develop, the answers can be elusive. I'll come right out front by saying that I work at Evans Cooling Systems, Inc. and stand behind the properties of our waterless coolant. I'll tell you about it at the end, but first I'm going to cover some things that you should know if you choose to use a water-based anti-freeze. If you're sick of overheating, you can just skip ahead. Physics Pressure: A higher pressure will raise the boiling point of a liquid. A lower pressure will lower the boiling point. Water runs down hill. For us, it's more important to recognize that vapor wants to go up. This is why cooling systems (almost) always flow out of the bottom of the radiator, down to the pump and into the bottom of the engine. Vent lines are placed so that vapor can escape (from the pump, head, or elsewhere) and go up into the radiator. This direction of coolant flow naturally carries vapor up and out of the engine. Overheating happens when the coolant temperature reaches its failure (boiling) point. Sometimes it is said that when coolant starts spitting out, it's your warning that things are getting too hot. It's not a warning of a failure; it is the failure. Vapor shielding: As the anti-freeze begins to boil inside the cooling jacket, it forms vapor. Soon the vapor increases from a few bubbles to being a layer along the metal surface. This layer prevents liquid from contacting the metal and the metal is effectively insulated; it is no longer “liquid cooled.” The metal temperature spikes and hot spot detonation, seizure, and other engine damage are the result. Head gasket failure is due to head warping which is the result of uneven temperatures across the head. System Layout There are from 6 to 9 basic components depending on the particular layout of the cooling system: radiator(s), cap, overflow tank, hoses, hose clamps, thermostat, cooling jacket (inside engine), pump, and fan. Dirt bikes will lack some of these parts and complex street bikes can have more. Avoid Boiling the Coolant The goal of the system is to cool the engine, but that statement is too simple. The goal is to keep the metal temperatures under control and this can only happen if the liquid is in contact with the metal and carries the heat away. It is often recognized that a greater amount of heat is removed through the action of boiling, but this is only true until the bubbles formed grow big and displace the liquid coolant. If the metal is in contact with vapor, not liquid, the metal temperature cannot be controlled. Boiling coolant is to be avoided. There are two sides to improving the efficiency of your cooling system. One is maintenance and the other the choice of components. Maintenance Keep the outside surfaces of the radiator clean. Spray water through the fins from the back to clean out mud and grass. I never use a pressure washer on my bikes. Some teams put a mesh across the front of the radiators in muddy conditions. If the fins get bent, you can spend some time to straighten them out. Every little bit helps improve efficiency. Check the hoses. Obviously you are looking for cracks or bulges so they can be replaced before a failure. Keep in mind that an older hose can leak through the threads. The hose may look fine, but the coolant can get through the inside layer of rubber and then follow the threads out. Leaks don't always drip to the ground; look for a crusty streak, sometimes at the pump. Change your anti-freeze every year. After time, the corrosion inhibiting additives fall out of solution and settle out of the coolant; this is the sludge that collects at low points in the system. When this happens, the anti-freeze will continue to cool the engine as it did before, but there is much less corrosion protection. If left like this for too long, the corrosion that forms will insulate the metal surfaces from the coolant and this WILL decrease the cooling efficiency. This is why they suggest using a vinegar rinse to clean the system out. Diagnosing an overheating engine Radiator cap: Does the gasket seal? Any rips in it or dirt under it?Is the small disc on the underside free to move? This disc is the return valve that lets coolant back into the radiator from the overflow tank when the engine cools. If the cap doesn't pressurize the system because it doesn't seal, the boiling point of the coolant will be lowered and overheating is the result. A leak elsewhere in the system can also cause a loss of pressure; at operating temperature, you should feel the pressure if you squeeze a hose. Thermostat: If it is stuck open, it may be hard to warm the engine up on a cold day.If it is stuck closed, the engine will run hot or overheat. You can test it by putting it in water and seeing if/when it opens as you heat it up. Thermostats have different temperature ratings. If it's a “190 thermostat” it should be open at 190F. Racers often remove the thermostat entirely to increase the flow rate of the coolant. Do not remove a bypass type thermostat unless you constrict or block the bypass line. There is a myth out there that if you remove the thermostat, the coolant will flow too quickly to shed the heat through the radiator. The radiator can dissipate heat just fine; in fact, it becomes more efficient with a greater liquid/air temperature difference. The myth originates from a real effect which is based on pressure. The thermostat (or restrictor that may be installed in its place) raises the pressure on the coolant in the engine as the pump pushes against it. This higher pressure raises the boiling point of the coolant inside the engine. Pump: Obviously, if the pump doesn't pump, you'll overheat. These days pump impellers are likely to be plastic. We've seen manufacturing problems where the impellers separate from the shaft; you could look at this impeller and not see that it's broken, but it would come off in your hand. We've also seen the blades snap off due to cavitation. Cavitation happens when a coolant is close to its boiling point. The “draw” side of the pump naturally has a lower pressure, and this can cause the fluid to vaporize. As the blades smack against this mix of vapor and liquid, they can wear or break. The pump is not designed to pump vapor so this cavitation also slows the coolant flow which will cause the temperature to rise. If the additives in the anti-freeze have fallen out of solution or you've been using straight water without a pump lube, the pump seal can fail leading to a bearing failure. Engine oil that looks creamy is telling you that there's water in it. If it's reddish brown like peanut butter, it's rusty water. Jetting: A lean fuel/air ratio will cause an engine to run hotter. An aftermarket pipe without proper jetting/fuel injection tuning will flow more air making the engine run leaner. A clogged jet can do the same. Changing things like cams, spark advance, and compression ratio can make an engine run hotter. Ethanol in the fuel will burn leaner. Look for a possible air leak in the boot between the carburetor and head. Altitude: It's not just that the air is less dense at altitude, but the lowered ambient pressure also has an effect. The radiator cap will pressurize the system to, say, 13 psi *over the atmospheric pressure*. A lower atmospheric pressure will lower the internal system pressure. You or your friends: If you are riding slowly, there is less airflow to the radiator. If you get stuck or are waiting at a bottleneck, that problem is worse. Air Pocket: Air trapped in the system can interrupt coolant flow and cause overheating. Optimizing the System: Hoses: Silicone hoses are better quality in general and resist heat stress and age cracking. There are silicone hose kits available that eliminate the plastic Y connector. This connector has a smaller inside diameter than the hose, so it restricts the flow; get rid of it if you can. If you go to silicone hoses, spend a little more on the recommended hose clamps so that they don't cut into the silicone. Silicone hoses are more delicate in terms of impacts, so consider a guard in places where a rock may hit it. Radiators: There are a number of aftermarket radiator companies that make upgraded radiators. Generally they are bigger and/or deeper which adds fluid capacity and surface area to the system, both of which help lower coolant temperature. Whatever radiators you use, make sure they're clean inside and out. Radiator cap: A higher pressure rated cap will raise the boiling point of the coolant. Race teams sometimes take this to an extreme; I've seen auto racing teams that have an air valve on the cap so they can pressurize it with an air compressor. The FIA limited the allowed pressure in Formula One for safety reasons. I don't recommend raising the pressure more than just a few psi. Pump: There are some aftermarket pumps available. A better impeller will increase flow and an efficiently designed housing can reduce the flow restriction. Fan: There are fan kits available now for some dirt bikes; increasing air flow to the radiator will decrease the coolant temperature. Making sure the fan is operating correctly is important. There can be failures of the temperature sensor or fan switch. Some people like to install a manual switch so they can override the automatic operation. If there is a shroud around the fan or ducting that the manufacturer installed, make sure it remains as they intended. Anti-Freeze: Any coolant with water in it has the same basic properties because those properties are limited by water's characteristics. Water boils at 212F at atmospheric pressure. The boiling point is raised a little when it's mixed 50/50 with glycol, either ethylene glycol or propylene glycol. The big increase in boiling point comes from pressurizing the system. Tap water is terrible stuff to use, but most of the anti-freeze for sale today is pre-mixed with clean water anyway. Many equipment manufacturers have guidelines on the anti-freeze to use such as “no phosphate or silicate based additives”. These additives can be gritty like sand and are bad for pump seals. Limitations of Water: Water is corrosive. Anti-freeze manufacturers use a number of different additive packages to fight this property, but they all settle out after time allowing the corrosion to occur. Some additives are bad for seals like silicates. Some additives, like the OAT type(organic acid technology) degrade silicone. Water conducts electricity. This electrolysis eats metal. You can buy “sacrificial” metal tablets to put in the system that will “absorb” the damage from electrolysis. Water's boiling point is too close to the operating temperature of the coolant. There is a very narrow safety margin and the anti-freeze will boil in specific locations before the system is observed to be overheating. The area around the exhaust valves is typically quite hot. When the anti-freeze boils here, a vapor layer forms that shields the metal surface from the liquid coolant. The metal temperature then spikes and detonation is the result. The engine will run poorly and lose power as the coolant temperature approaches its failure point. While the system pressure raises the boiling point, it also sets up a situation where a puncture will expel all the coolant. Hot anti-freeze will gush from an opened cap, but not because of the pressure that the cap regulates. When the cap is removed, the pressure drops which drops the boiling point in the system. It is the flash boiling that happens inside the engine that causes the gusher. Evans Waterless Coolant: Like I said at the top, I work at Evans, but I'm not just a paid promoter. I started using Evans waterless coolant while road racing in the 1990's when it was still legal for pavement racing. As I became more familiar with its properties, I put it in all my vehicles and started selling it at the track and online. Things grew to the point that my volume was getting noticed by the company. Years later, and here we are with a formula specifically designed for the powersports industry. I'd appreciate it if you'd let me tell you about the product that I believe should be in every performance machine out there. You wouldn't take the back off your watch and pour water in it; it's time to stop pouring water in your engine! The high boiling point of Evans means that the coolant temperature won't go above its failure point. It operates within the same temperature range as conventional anti-freeze and is able to stay in contact with metal surfaces, even at stressful points like around the exhaust valves. Pump cavitation is avoided, as is electrolysis. All of Evans' coolant formulas are non-corrosive and last the lifetime of the engine. If I'm rebuilding an engine, I will save the coolant and pour it back in the rebuilt engine. Evans Coolant doesn't freeze; we state that it will flow at -40F, but we have not found a freezing point. After lowering a sample to -60F without freezing, we decided to talk about its pour point like the oil industry does. Evans Coolant is a patented blend of chemicals, most of which are commonly found in conventional anti-freeze formulas, and additives with no water. It is not a gel and will not turn gooey if anti-freeze is added to it. If something were to happen on the trail and you are forced to add water or anti-freeze, it will simply perform like conventional anti-freeze, no worse. Information on the web about poor cold weather performance of Evans Coolant refers to our oldest formula. The current formulas are approved for all weather conditions and are mandated by Rotax for use in their 900 series aircraft engines. Evans Coolant has a high boiling point of 375F at atmospheric pressure. While it does not need pressure to raise its boiling point, we do not recommend modifying the system to hold zero pressure. It will expand 7% at operating temperature so you will notice some movement to the expansion tank, but it doesn't build pressure like water does. If you were to open the cap when hot, it shouldn't spurt out. A little might come out, like a tablespoon, but if more does, it is a sign that there is either water present or an air pocket in the system. The added safety margin of the high boiling point will save the engine when conditions become extreme. Through an unintentional error that cut air flow to the radiator, I saw the coolant temperature on my road race bike go to 297F. The bike was still running alright, so we changed the oil and fixed the cause of the problem. The engine ran fine for all the races that weekend and then all the races at the finals at Daytona. Evans Powersports Coolant is trusted by race teams around the world. I encourage you to go to our website www.evanscooling.com to learn more and see the interview with Jay Leno or stop by our Facebook page http://www.facebook....300949013264495 for a more personal interaction. When you hear about our Chinese business, you should know that we make the coolant in Pennsylvania and export it into China. Evans China has installed American made waterless coolant into more than 150,000 new passenger cars so far!
  7. 2 reviews

    HDPE (high density polyethylene) is an ideal material for these bolt on covers as it provides impact AND abrasion resistance. It's nature is to provide good strength against sharp and blunt impacts while dispersing the impact energy to help avoid the Husqvarna and KTM cast aluminium clutch and stator covers from breaking. Don't confuse these with more expensive but inferior design ABS plastic covers. Our covers are thick and include stainless steel bolt inserts and correct length bolts to ensure a good fit and tight seal; no loose covers and no oil drips. Our competitors don't use these stainless steel inserts and force you to try to torque the bolts into plastic; a recipe for disaster and impossible to achieve the correct bolt torque. We have spent many months of design and real-world testing on these, we are very proud of the outcome.
  8. 1 review

    Inline Thermostat for motorcycles. CONTACT INFORMATION: Address: Watt-man LLC 6501 E. Greenway Pkwy, #103-296 Scottsdale, AZ 85254 USA e-mail: watt-man@cox.net phone: (602)380-5756
  9. 1 review

    XR'S Only BigFin Head Mod (xr400)
  10. 1 review

    295cc big bore with NSC plating. Came with Wossner forged piston. Chose the pump gas/more power everywhere porting package.
  11. 2 reviews

    Head Machining Modification KTM 300EXC/MXC/XC/XC-W ’04 -’17 Very noticeable and usable boost to the low-end and mid-range power that will make your 300 easier to ride. This mod can be used with a stock or ported cylinder. This is a very inexpensive bang for the buck…. a no brainer. > Works well with pump gas, race gas is not needed or recommended > Does not require re-jetting > Helps clean up jetting issues > Does not adversely affect top-end performance > Machining/compression ratio is adjusted to match your elevation > Compatible with all types of riding & racing > Does not increase coolant or engine temperature > Does not include new head o-rings or jetting specs > 2 day turnaround time – no appointment, email or phone call necessary > Please include a completed service form with the shipment
  12. 1 review

    GENERAL INFORMATION This is a high performance valve spring set made by APE. Sold by bigborethumpers. The springs are correct for installing with stainless steel intake valves, the set includes machined titanium valve retainers, the springs and the keepers. All manufactured in house at their facility.
  13. 1 review

    Most of us would rather ride than wrench, but with the Hot Cams Valve Shim Kit you can at least get your valve adjustments done quickly and accurately while saving some money. This Valve Shim Kit from Hot Cams will save you from unnecessary trips to the store or ordering incorrect shim sizes since you’ll have all the shims you need on hand for pretty much any clearance. These shims are precisely manufactured with the exact diameter for your machine and are sized in convenient increments for a total of 47 different sizes of shim. 3 shims are included for each size and are organized in a compartmentalized plastic container to keep all of your 141 total shims together.
  14. 1 review

    GENERAL INFORMATION Silent chain Exclusive heat treated links create excellent friction and impact resistance Engineered to exceed OEM specifications and tolerances
  15. 1 review

    DESCRIPTION Stage 2 Gold Series: Dual cam engine. Intake and exhaust cams sold separately. Mid to top RPM application. Requires valve spring kit PART #VSK4001IN. SPECIFICATIONS Exhaust Duration (Degrees at 1mm): 256.00 Exhaust Lift (mm): 8.76 Exhaust Lobe Center (Degrees): 102.50 Exhaust Valve Lash (mm): .20 Intake Duration (Degrees at 1mm): .00 Intake Lift (mm): .00 Intake Lobe Center (Degrees): .00 Intake Valve Lash (mm): .00 Shim Kit: HCSHIM01 Exhaust Duration (Degrees at 1mm): .00 Exhaust Lift (mm): .00 Exhaust Lobe Center (Degrees): .00 Exhaust Valve Lash (mm): .00 Intake Duration (Degrees at 1mm): 261.00 Intake Lift (mm): 8.79 Intake Lobe Center (Degrees): 110.00 Intake Valve Lash (mm): .15 Shim Kit: HCSHIM01
  16. 1 review

    PRODUCT DESCRIPTION Steel oil pump gears to replace the 3 original plastic ones for durability! Please choose below if you would like to add inner clutch cover gasket and clutch basket tab washer necessary for install. Special order item, takes approximately 14-21 days to ship.
  17. 3 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION We are proud to distribute the German made Wossner line of pistons. Wossner quality is well known around the world. All Wossner pistons feature forged construction with fully coated teflon skirts and optimized design for light weight and strength. If the piston you need is not listed please contact us as we distribute the entire Wossner product line.
  18. 2 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION Over sized intake valves to suport the BB/stroker
  19. 21 reviews

    Save yourself thousands in costly repairs! The ThumperTalk Manual Cam Chain Tensioner (MCCT) is designed to replace the automatic and hydraulic tensioners found on today's hi-performance 4-stroke engines. Factory automatic adjusters can back out when the throttle is suddenly closed at higher rpms. This allows the cams to momentarily go out of time and can result in bent valves and/or serious engine damage! Hydraulic tensioners have a tendency to put too much tension on the chain guide under high rpm/high oil pressure conditions, resulting in premature cam chain wear. Installation of a ThumperTalk Manual Cam Chain Tensioner will allow you to maintain the proper, constant cam chain tension necessary for reliable hi-performance riding and it will not backout. This is a high quality product, proudly made in the USA. There are thousands of these units in service, so buy in confidence! Precision machined billet aluminum body Oring seals, both on the body and threads Stainless steel adjuster bolt & locknut Clear anodized body for long lasting good looks
  20. 1 review

    CNC machined from 6061 T6 alloy Laser etched logo Distinctive laser etched machined Yoshimura Magnasonian finish Kit Includes Crankshaft Inspection Plug and the Small TDC Plug
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