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Found 1,088 results

  1. Hello I've been having issue trying to pin down an exhaust to purchase I ride predominantly off road on my drz400e aus spec (exhaust noise non issue) and I've limited my chooses to an mrd zpro and a rs3 full system Does the mrd shift the torque so the pull starts later not sooner due to it being free flowing Is the rs3 more suitable on dirt than a zpro Price Wise I can get the rs3 full system for $715AUD and the mrd Zpro is $788AUD Shipped+plus with all the extra bits In the future I will do some engine mods but before those will be suspension.
  2. Does anyone know how I can get my ttr 125 to sound better, I don't want to spend 200 bucks on a fmf pipe or something like that, anyone know any mods I can do to it while maintaining my spark arrestor and green sticker status, anyone tried one of those chinese clamp on mufflers from ebay ?
  3. This requires welding skills or access to a welder and knowledge of how to weld. I needed a spark arrestor for use in a national forrest, but didn't have a stainless screen insert for my Dr. D, so I made one from an old Supertrapp (ST). I took the Dr. D end cap with me to the auto parts store and found an exhaust pipe adaptor that would fit over the end pipe (about 1 5/8" or 1 7/8", can't remember), but it fit over the end tube with little play. I also got a 1/4" bolt about 6" long. Then I got the correct U bolt clamp for that size pipe. At home, I welded one old ST diffuser plate onto the end of the the adaptor, making sure I had the correct side out. Sliding the adaptor pipe onto the end pipe, I located a place where I drilled holes thru both sides of the adaptor so I could slide a cross bar in to hold my bolt. The bolt holds the end cap and diffuser plates on. I made sure there was also enough bolt length to hold at least 12 diffuser plates onto the end and still bolt the end cap on. With the cross bar in place, I tack welded the bolt to the cross bar making sure it was centered in the adaptor tube. Once I was happy with the locations of everything, I finished all welding, and took a hack saw and split the end that would slide onto the stock pipe end in 4 places, and bolted the spark arrestor onto the muffler exit. While it's not pretty, it does the job and no ranger can poke a stick thru it. With 12 plates, its slightly quiter than stock at slow speeds, but open it up, and it sounds great, though not sure how loud it is since it has not been tested. And it didn't kill power anywhere in the power band... I can still loft the front wheel in 4th on my YZ250F. Anyway, it works for me, and thought I'd pass along. Note: USFS approved spark arrestors are required for use on public lands. While this mod might be effective, it may not pass an inspection.
  4. After doing a lot of reading and some practical experiments recently, I just thought I'd pass on a few things I've learned (or think I've learned). This is not meant to be a comprehensive treatment of 2T exhaust designs, just a few observations that try and explain how they work in simple terms, and might help in selecting the right pipe for your application or in modifying an existing pipe to better suit your needs. Here's an ultra-simplified breakdown of the pipe sections and what they do (in order from cylinder to tailpipe): Head Tube (before the 1st cone): this basically determines the maximum rpm (minimum pulse width) at which the pipe will act to suck out (scavenge) exhaust gas. Most modern head tubes are either super short or non-existent to make sure the divergent cone's scavenging effect extends up to redline and beyond, although a long head tube might be used to boost mid and low-end power at the expense of top end. The tube diameter can also have a pronounced effect on overall exhaust-system back pressure. Divergent Cone(s): this section determines the strength and duration of the scavenging effect during the initial part of the exhaust-port-open period, i.e. while pulling exhaust from the cylinder and fresh mixture from the crankcase. Short, steeply-angled cones give a strong suction effect over a narrower time (rpm) span, while longer/shallower cones provide a reduced scavenging effect over a wider rpm range. Apparently it's quite common for this pipe section to do its job too well, and pull fresh mixture out into the pipe (see 'Convergent Cone(s)' below). Center Section: delays the action of the convergent cone to reduce the possibility of burnt exhaust being pushed back into the cylinder before the exhaust port closes. Convergent Cone(s): provides a positive pressure pulse 'echo' that (ideally) pushes any fresh mixture lost into the forward part of the pipe back into the cylinder before the exhaust port closes. Cone angle considerations are similar to the divergent cone, although the length is usually shorter to keep the pulse strong. Tailpipe/'stinger': provides a means of escape for the exhaust gases, and largely determines the overall exhaust-system back pressure unless a restrictive head tube is used. Speculation: What follows is based on things I've read, recent mods to my 175's exhaust pipe, and checking out some of my other pipes which I've been happy (and unhappy) with: The pipe does pretty much the same thing at all rpm's, as the pulse width of even the lowest-rpm initial exhaust pulse is extremely short compared to the pipe length. For example, at high rpm a low-end pipe will continue to pull fresh mixture into the pipe after a high-rpm-only pipe would have stopped, and will still send pressure pulses back to the exhaust port after they'll do any good, perhaps even after the port is closed. In the absence of pipe action, cylinder scavenging efficiency decreases as rpm increases (assuming a 'ballpark-normal' exhaust port height in the vicinity of 50% of stroke), due to reduced exhaust duration combined with increasing gas inertia. If this were NOT true, increasing exhaust duration by raising the top of the exhaust port would not result in additional high-rpm power. Probably for this reason, every modern pipe design I've seen incorporates head pipes that start diverging practically from the exhaust manifold, providing additional scavenging at high rpm. On a related note ... Long straight head pipes are not for me. Giving up strong acceleration in the top part of the rpm range - which, to me, is the most enjoyable part of the 2T experience - for the sake of more mids and bottom end just isn't my idea of a good time, although I've tried really hard to like it for many months now. It seems like most modern pipe makers are in agreement with me on this one. I grafted a tapered (divergent) head section onto my 175's pipe, and the difference was night-and-day; like getting back a normal 2T powerband (hard pull to redline) instead of the original surge-and-die response - and in this case, I didn't lose any low end, just some of the mid hit, which mainly just resulted in wheelspin anyway. Vintage pipes seem far more likely to have long head pipes than those used on EVO or modern bikes. Too-short center sections should be avoided unless absolute max top end power is the goal. It seems better to me to 'go long' with the center section to set the convergent cone's timing to enhance only low and midrange power (when the exhaust port is open longer and there's a greater chance of losing fresh charge into the exhaust) than run the risk of jamming exhaust gas back into the cylinder at lower revs for the sake of a high rpm power gain. I recently tried a pipe with an extremely short center section and convergent cone, and it threw away a bunch of power under 7K for a short burst way up high; another recent experience with an aftermarket 'fatty' pipe using this design was almost identical. To expand on the above - in my opinion, the convergent cone's design and placement/timing has a lot of potential to reduce low and mid power, through premature pulses stuffing exhaust back into the exhaust port. It seems that while low-mid pipes can also have decent top end, mainly top-end pipes will always have reduced low end power. For most riding, It seems better to me to design a pipe to achieve a guaranteed cylinder full of clean fuel mixture at all times - perhaps accompanied by some fresh-mixture loss out the pipe and loss of fuel efficiency - than one with more potential top-end power combined with the risk of a cylinder (or worse yet, crankcase) contaminated with exhaust gas at low and mid revs. Of course, some applications (road racing, etc.) demand absolute max top-end power, with lows/mids being expendable. I wonder if the major manufacturers and/or pipe makers use infrared cameras in the pipe headers to find out just how much fresh mixture escapes into the pipe at various engine speeds? I Googled it but didn't find anything relating to motorcycles. I don't know how many audio/electronics guys we have here, but one thing that really helped me in understanding pipes was realizing that a 2T exhaust is an analog device with a digital input. A pulse (exhaust port opening) is fed into a megaphone (horn), delayed slightly by the pipe's center section, then reflected by the convergent cone (echo chamber). The pipe works on one exhaust event at a time, so it was helpful for me to think solely in terms of elapsed time and single event duration, rather than exhaust repetition rate (which mainly becomes important if the pipe is overly restrictive and builds up excessive pressure at higher rpm's). All the above is just my $.02. I'm no pipe expert, I just read the papers. Below are some fairly good examples of the different types of pipes. Note the long head pipe on the low-end unit, the shorter head pipe and longer cones/center section of the wide-range pipe, and the shortness/fatness of the high-rpm pipe at the bottom.
  5. 3 reviews

    Replaces stock exhaust tip which improves performance but retains low dB sound. It is stealthy. Good interim option until an FMF can be put on. ITEM SPECIFICATION Condition: New Manufacturer Part Number: 1DX-E47A0-V0-00 1DX-E47A0-V1-00 Part Brand: Yamaha/FMF Warranty: Yes Country of Manufacture: United States
  6. 1 review

    The only silencer you can get that will increase power, is lighter, quieter, and completely rebuildable. Exclusive Variable-Flow Chamber design that allows the correct amount of exhaust flow at all times. This effectively increases horsepower and torgue over all RPMs.
  7. 0 comments

    i got my first dirt bike when i was 8. it was a kc70cc pit bike. after that when i was about 12, i got a 2007 ttr 125. a year and a half later a bought the 2002 rm 125. my dad had a rm 250 when i had the ttr 125. i fell in love with the rm's plus my cousin used to race and one of his favorite bikes was the rm.
  8. 0 comments

    A blast to ride around, even for a 180# 71" adult. More importantly, son #1 seems to love it!
  9. 1 review

    EVO Mini Series exhaust system made for all motorcycles or ATVs from 55cc to 230cc Contains our state of the art computer mapping power curve to get the best broadest power available Available with tapered or stepped head pipe and tail sections Stainless steel heat shield on all models New euro end cap like the larger Big Gun exhaust systems to give the total factory look 18 gauge mild steel pipe Internal/external ceramic coating satin silver finish 6061 T-6 aluminum outlet end cap with removable tip for spark arrestor Billet aluminum outlet end cap with removable tip for spark arrestor USFS approved screen type spark arrestor Endless strand hi-performance silencer packing with stainless steel screen 6 month manufacturers warranty
  10. 0 comments

    Awesome bike...pulls hard and will go full 3rd gear wheelie with 285 LB me on it. Always starts after a crash, and pulled me out of pipe deep clay mud. The longer I have this bike the more I love it.
  11. 0 comments

    great bike to start out on, not so great when you want to fix it due to production only being in 1998/1999
  12. nsky

    Yamaha YFZ450R (2012)

    0 comments

    Love this thing, a bit of a wrestle with it on rough trails, but absolute fun.
  13. 0 comments

    Good moto bike, doesn't corner as well as the newer bikes, but for an 04' it still gets around the track good.
  14. 0 comments

    Great smooth power, light and turns as good as any modern 450.
  15. 0 comments

    Love the bike so far, I've order a jet kit, exhaust, sm front fender, fender eliminator
  16. 0 comments

    Third bike and second supermoto. So far it is my favorite bike. Thing is fun to ride on the streets and can touch dirt without exploding. Only problem is it's going to take up a lot of my money making it even better.
  17. 0 comments

    It is a work in progress, but is easy to work on and well made. Parts aren't hard to find either.
  18. j420

    Suzuki DR-Z400S (2005)

    0 comments

    It's a fun bike for dual riding.
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