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Found 5 results

  1. Victor Drevin

    Rear Oil Specification

    So I'm changing gear oil on my Ktm 85 sx, and the manual says that I have to fill up with 15w 50 gear oil, but we only have 10w 30. Do I need to use that exact oil or is that only if a wanna keep it top notch? And would it be fine if I just fill it up for a couple rides, and change after like two rides when I have new oil that complies with the specifications?
  2. Collin Johnson

    Throttle Cable Help

    My throttle cable broke right close where it connects to the lever. I ordered one of of Ebay that was the right length and looked similar. When I got it in the mail and compared it to the old one, the "bolt" that screws in to the housing is bigger then the old one so I can't screw it in there. Can someone tell me how I can make it work? I'm including pictures.
  3. With a little bit of work on your part, Wiseco Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits can help your dirt toys deliver years of service. Read on for full details on these reliable and affordable valve replacement kits. One of the basic truths of the imperfect world we live in is that the people who design machines are not the same people who have to maintain those machines. This often leads to situations where something that seemed like the way to go on the CAD screen turns out to be more difficult or more expensive to fix in the real world than it otherwise would be. Exotic materials and painstaking processes that are economical to implement when you’re mass-producing something turn out to be expensive to service in the field. Today's 4-strokes are engineered to be high-tech, but the parts come with a big price tag. In this single-serving, throw-it-away-when-it-breaks world, there are some noble souls who take a stand and say that we should be able to service and maintain things ourselves instead of discarding them, bringing new life to machines that need a bit of a refresh. Such is the case with Wiseco’s Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits for a variety of popular dirt bike and ATV applications. Wiseco Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits were engineered to be a more reliable and affordable option for riders who need to replace valves in their modern four-stroke machines. Read on for complete details! When faced with the price tag on factory replacement parts for bikes that came with trick valvetrain components, many owners cringe at the price of refurbishing a tired engine. However, with the right components at the right price, turning your dirt bike’s mid-life crisis around and letting it catch its second wind can be easy. Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday With the incredibly impressive machines under race tents worldwide, nobody wants to buy a new bike that has a whiff of “outdated” technology surrounding it, so a lot of the high-end features that really only make a difference to the top one percent of professional racers become must-haves for weekend warriors who just want to trail ride with their kids. When those parts wear out, the exotic bragging rights come with a cost, though. “Titanium is a great valve material due to the strength-to-weight ratio, and also the material’s ability to deal with the high temperature of combustion,” Wiseco Product Manager Dave Sulecki explains. “The light weight is important for engine acceleration; imagine how a heavy component takes more energy to move, and you can see where titanium is ideal when the camshaft needs to accelerate the valve quickly with less energy, and you can see that a lightweight component would be critical for a high-end racing engine.” Titanium is popular for valves for its light weight properties, but they are expensive to manufacture and can wear out faster than steel. While those race-spec valves come standard because they’re a positive selling point on the dealership floor, they’re mostly there for bragging rights instead of making a difference you’ll feel when twisting the throttle yourself, and it’s cheaper for the manufacturer to make everything to one specification than it is to have separate designs. “This light weight and performance comes at a greater cost,” Sulecki adds. “The material is more expensive, and costs more to machine or form into a valve. Additionally, the titanium requires a special coating to deal with the heat and wear, which also adds cost. This expense is needed for the highest performing engines, like the type you find in nearly all levels of racing from motocross up to Formula 1.” Sticker Shock Even expensive, exotic materials wear out, though, and when it’s time to freshen up the valvetrain of your bike, you might be surprised to see just how much it will cost to replace like-for-like with factory components. Per Sulecki, “Steel valves are a great low cost alternative to titanium, and offer longevity, reliability, and improved wear over titanium. Some customers are not always racing their vehicles, and just want longer service intervals and the peace of mind that comes with this material.” "Steel valves are a great low cost alternative to titanium, and offer longevity, reliability, and improved wear over titanium." - Dave Sulecki, Wiseco Powersports Product Manager That’s where Wiseco’s Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits enter the picture. They’re designed to be an affordable way to refresh your high-tech dirt bike’s valvetrain. Although they may not be made from titanium, that doesn’t mean they aren’t precision-engineered. “Because steel valves are a small percentage heavier than titanium valves, heavier-rate valve springs are required to control the valve and protect the engine from valve float (the condition where the heavier valve will stay open under high RPM engine speeds),” Sulecki explains. “These springs are included with the Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits.” Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits are available separately for both intake and exhaust valves. They come complete with the valves, springs, and even a free packet of cam lube to make sure every box is checked during your reassembly. Converting to steel valves requires using valve springs designed for the specific weight of the valve. Springs are included with Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits. Wiseco’s extensive experience with powersports valvetrain components provides confidence that their conversion kits are engineered to restore showroom-floor performance, and they utilize stock retainers, seals, shims, and other components for affordability and drop-in compatibility. The springs are crafted from premium chrome vanadium steel, and the nitrided steel valves can actually outlast an OEM titanium valve by a factor of three or more. Wiseco's nitrided steel valves are designed to utilize stock retainers, keepers, and seals. The steel conversion valve springs are manufactured from chrome vanadium steel. Time For A Change So, how do you know when it’s time to replace the stock components, short of a dropped valve or broken spring? Per Sulecki, “Valves and valve springs wear over time, like any highly-stressed engine component. When you are checking the valve clearance, or making shim adjustments, this is always a good indicator how quickly the valves are wearing or receding into the seat.” Keeping an eye on these telltales during your regular maintenance will allow you to judge when your factory valves and springs are reaching the end of their service life. Entire engine in need of a refresh? Garage Buddy also offers Complete Engine Rebuild Kits, check them out here. “When you are inspecting your top end for general overall health, such as the piston and ring condition, this is the best time to take a closer look at the valves and valve springs,” he continues. “Valves and springs need to be removed from the cylinder head for full inspection. Once these are removed, you can look closely at the condition of the valve face where it seals to the valve seat, and also the condition of the valve head overall and the stem condition. Any cupping or damage to the valve face means it is time to replace the valve, and any similar wear to the valve seat means replacement or re-cutting will be needed.” Inspecting your valves for wear while doing a top end is a good idea. Closely inspect the sealing surface of the valve for cupping, and inspect the rest of the valve for wear or damage. It's a good idea to also check the groove at the top of the stem for signs of wear to avoid breakage. Over time, springs become less elastic and may no longer be able to control valve motion at high speeds, but it’s not the sort of wear that is immediately obvious to the naked eye. Sulecki suggests, “Valve springs should be inspected for free length, and also overall condition, looking for any wear marks or defects that can lead to spring failure.” Any nicks or cracks are a sure sign of impending doom, and your cue to replace the entire set. Valve spring free length can be measured and compared to the recommended spec to get an idea of wear on the spring. Doing the Job Right Depending on your level of mechanical aptitude and how well-equipped your garage is, valve replacement might be a job you want to subcontract to a professional. “For most all valve replacements, it is a good idea to work with a qualified builder if you are not sure about the condition of any of these components,” Sulecki suggests. “The work can be done in your own workshop, but there are some special tools required to remove the valves from the head, and having an experienced eye on these items is always the best approach if you are not sure what to look for. An OEM service manual is always the best place to start, they will provide information about any special tools, and guidelines of what to look for regarding valves, valve seats, and even valve guides, and their condition.” When replacing your valves, be sure to use proper tools and follow all procedures and specifications outlined in your owner's manual. If you're unsure about performing your own valve maintenance, we recommend taking your machine to a trustworthy and certified shop. Whether tackling the job yourself or letting a pro handle your top-end maintenance, you’ll save time and money by seeing to all the wear-prone components at the same time. Sulecki adds, “When replacing valves, it is a good idea to inspect the top end for any concerning issues or conditions. Inspect the valve seals, valve keepers and seats, shim buckets, the condition of the cylinder head (flatness and sealing condition), and cam chain condition.” Needless to say, the time to service or replace these components is while everything is apart in the first place, and by using quality components like Wiseco’s Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits, you’ll protect your investment for many off-road seasons to come. Wiseco Garage Buddy Steel Valve Kits are available separately for both intake and exhaust valves.
  4. #Husqvarna #CR125 #2-Stroke #Maintenance #Advice
  5. Find out how to relieve an exhaust bridge and drill lubrication holes in 2 stroke applications, so you can get the most out of your piston! When you order a new Wiseco 2-stroke piston and open up the box and read the instructions, you might see something like “follow these steps to drill the lubrication holes.” There’s no doubt that the thought of drilling holes in your new piston can be scary and intimidating. But not to worry! We’ll get you through it right here with all the information you need and a step-by-step. Relieving the exhaust bridge and drilling lubrication holes is a common part of the 2-stroke top end replacement process, but the importance of performing these steps is unrealized by many and neglected too often. Drilling lubrication holes is a simple but important process for many 2 stroke applications. So, what is an exhaust bridge? First things first, not all 2-stroke cylinders have an exhaust bridge. So if your cylinder does not have one, drilling holes in your piston is not necessary. The exhaust bridge is the thin strip of metal that separates the exhaust ports in the cylinder. Whether you look into the exhaust ports through the exhaust outlet or through the cylinder bore, if you see a thin metal wall separating your exhaust ports, that is your exhaust bridge. For the purpose of installing a new Wiseco piston, the area of concern is the edge of the exhaust bridge on the inside of the cylinder bore. The exhaust bridge is the edge of the wall separating the exhaust ports on some 2 stroke cylinders. Why do I need to relieve the exhaust bridge? Now that we know what the exhaust bridge is, it’s important to understand why we feel this machine work is essential to replacing a 2-stroke top end. The most heat in your motor is generated from combustion in the cylinder during normal operation. Specifically, the exhaust port(s) of the cylinder are exposed to the most heat because this is the only way out for the hot gas produced during combustion. This means that under normal running conditions, your piston and your exhaust bridge are constantly under the pressure of extreme heat. Wiseco pistons are made from forged aluminum, which offers more strength and reliability, but also expands faster under heat than an OEM cast piston. The exhaust bridge will also expand more than the rest of the cylinder because it is such a thin structure. The lack of material makes it harder for heat to dissipate before it affects the aluminum and causes expansion. Expansion under heat is normal, but must be compensated for to make sure you get the most life and best performance out of your top end. Relieving the exhaust bridge simply means taking a small amount of material off the face the bridge in order to make room for expansion. If there wasn't any extra clearance, the exhaust bridge would expand past the cylinder wall once your motor heats up. This leads to scoring on the piston as it comes into contact with the exhaust bridge, especially as the piston expands at the same time. Notice the small amount of material taken off of the exhaust bridge, and the blending back into the cylinder. Read below on how to accomplish this. Relieving the Exhaust Bridge Now that we have some understanding established, let’s go through how to get it done. As always, if you don’t feel comfortable doing this work, this can commonly be done by the shop performing your cylinder work. If you have the rights tools, this can be done in the garage on cast iron and steel cylinder bore liners. We recommend using a die grinder with a small sanding roll to gently remove .003” of material off the cylinder wall face of the exhaust bridge. After the material is removed, the machining must be blended with the rest of the cylinder wall at the top and bottom of the exhaust bridge. You want to make sure there’s an easy slope for the piston ring to slide over when entering and exiting the exhaust bridge relief. If your cylinder is lined with Nikasil, this process will not work because that material is too hard. Your exhaust bridge must be relieved before being lined with Nikasil to achieve the same result. Check with the shop you choose for your cylinder work if you are unsure. Why do I need to drill holes in my piston? Relieving the exhaust bridge will make sure there’s no expansion past the cylinder wall, but we still want to make sure we keep the heat as low as possible. With small holes drilled into the skirt of the piston, oil underneath the piston will makes its way through the holes, and lubricate the contact point between the piston and exhaust bridge. Better lubrication means less friction, and less friction means less heat, which is what we want to make sure we don’t have any abnormal wear. Drilling Lubrication Holes Make sure you have the instruction sheet that came with your new piston. This drilling information can also be found there, complete with a visual diagram. Be prepared with your instruction sheet. 1. Install the piston and wrist pin on the connecting rod with one circlip. Make sure the arrow stamped on the dome of the piston is facing the exhaust side of the cylinder. 2. Slide the cylinder over the piston until the cylinder is in its normal position on the crankcase. Temporarily install the piston on the connecting rod and slide the cylinder over the piston. 3. Slowly turn the engine over until the bottom ring groove (or the only ring groove if your piston has only one) on the piston is at the top of the exhaust bridge. You can look through the exhaust port of the cylinder to help know when the piston is in the correct spot. 4. Go through the exhaust port with a pencil and trace a line on the piston skirt for each side of the exhaust bridge. Trace two lines on the piston, one on each side of the exhaust bridge. 5. Once the lines are traced and visible, remove the cylinder and the piston. 6. Start .300” below the bottom ring groove and mark two points .375” apart from each other. Make sure the points are centered horizontally between the two lines you traced. Use the proper measurements to mark 2 points for the holes to be drilled. 7. Drill two holes .060” - .090” in diameter (1/16” or 5/64” drill bit) on your marked points (one hole on each point). Drill holes on your marked points with one of the specified drill bits. 8. Remove all burrs from drilling the lubrication holes. On the inside of the piston, lightly sand with 400-600 grit sand paper. On the outside of the piston, use a ¼” drill bit and twirl it between your fingers over the holes you drilled to break away any edges and imperfections. 9. Wash the cylinder and piston with soap and water, and use compressed air to remove any water and debris. 10. Wipe the cylinder wall with light coat of oil. Whichever 2-cycle oil you normally use is fine. 11. Continue your top end rebuild as normal. This is how your final product should look all cleaned up and deburred. Why doesn't Wiseco pre-drill the holes in the pistons during manufacturing? Some Wiseco two-stroke pistons do come with these lubrication holes pre-drilled. However, there are certain applications that use the same piston across a wide range of model years, but the location of the exhaust ports across those years changes. Therefore, while the piston remains the same, the location of the lubrication holes will vary based the specific year cylinder for certain applications. Want to see the latest in 2-stroke piston technology? Read about the Wiseco 2-Stroke Racer Elite pistons here. See all that Wiseco has to offer for your 2-stroke here.
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