Jump to content

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'Offroad'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Dirt Bikes
    • General Dirt Bike Forums
    • Make / Model Specific
    • Dirt Bike Technical Forums
    • Special Interest Forums
    • Dirt Bike Regional Discussion
  • General
  • ATV / UTV
  • Inside TT
  • ThumperTalk Clubs FAQ & Help's FAQ/Help & Discussion
  • Chadwick, Missouri: Information & Riding's Topics
  • So Cal Flattrack's Club Forum
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Discussion
  • Jersey MX and offroad's Places you ride
  • Jersey MX and offroad's Discussion
  • SE Ohio Riders's Club Discussion
  • NorCal Trail Riders's Topics
  • NV Desert Exploration's Discussion
  • North Texas Enduro Riders's Topics
  • Twistin it in PHX's Introduce yourself!
  • Twistin it in PHX's Discussion
  • So-Cal Track and Trail's 1st club ride coming soon...
  • Moto TnT Track & Trail's Moto Tnt Racing Questions
  • Moto TnT Track & Trail's Rider's Forum
  • Dualspot Riders Orange County So~CaL's Club Discussion
  • Niagara region's Club Discussion
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Unanounced ride(s) recap(s)
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Supplements & recovery aids
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Bikes maintenance & restoration
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Safety gear & apparel
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's General
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's Riding technique
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's Club Discussion
  • NC woods riders.'s Club Discussion
  • Colorado US Route 50 Rides's Club Discussion
  • Middle GA Off-Road & Trails's Club Discussion
  • WNY Dual Sport Trail Riders's General Discussion's
  • SoCal JUST RIGHT riding club's SUNDAY 10.13
  • South Texas Dirt riders's Topics
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Trail equipment and how to carry it
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's General Discussion
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Introduce Yourself
  • New England riders's Events

Categories

  • Powersports Gear & Apparel
  • Universal Parts & Accessories
  • Parts & Acc. - Japanese Bikes
    • Honda Parts & Accessories
    • Kawasaki Parts & Accessories
    • Suzuki Parts & Accessories
    • Yamaha Parts & Accessories
  • Parts & Acc. - Euro Bikes
    • Beta Parts & Accessories
    • Husqvarna Parts & Accessories
    • KTM Parts & Accessories
    • Other Euro Parts & Accessories
  • Motorcycles
    • Off-Road Motorcycles
    • Dual Sport Motorcycles
    • Street Motorcycles

Products Categories

Vehicles Categories

Garages

Blogs

There are no results to display.

There are no results to display.

Calendars

  • ThumperTalk Clubs FAQ & Help's Club Calendar
  • Chadwick, Missouri: Information & Riding's Events
  • So Cal Flattrack's Club Calendar
  • So Cal Flattrack's Events
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Club Calendar
  • Thumperjunkies - Ottawa & Eastern Ontario Riders's Events
  • SE Ohio Riders's Events Calendar
  • NorCal Trail Riders's Ride & Event calendar
  • NV Desert Exploration's Stuff that happens on a particular date
  • Central Washington riders's Events
  • Dualspot Riders Orange County So~CaL's Events Calendar
  • Niagara region's Club Events Calendar
  • Walker Valley Single Track Riders's I love Mondays trail ride
  • Sacramento Area Trail Riders's Events Calendar
  • NC woods riders.'s Club Calendar
  • Colorado US Route 50 Rides's Club Calendar
  • Middle GA Off-Road & Trails's Club Calendar
  • PNW Trail Maintenance Club's Calendar
  • North County San Diego - DirtbikesWithDad.com's 2020 Calendar

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Interests

Found 10,000 results

  1. So here's my project. A few months ago I was scanning craigslist for a 125 2 stroke around 1000 dollars or less. My dad and i picked up a 1996 ktm 125 exc for $800 in very good condition considering the year. The bike needed a stator and coil and possibly a clutch. The dude had rebuilt the top end about 8 months before we bought it. The story goes that his son was riding and well yeah, the stator went out. He rebuilt the forks, put new tires on it, and rebuilt the carb, or so he told us. 4 months from when we bought it, we have fixed the stator and coil and now have great spark. We also rebuilt the carb to the best of our ability and have found out that it needs a needle and seat. We fixed that and I got to ride it for a total of 10 minutes. The bike ran great but was leaking some coolant. After those 10 minutes I parked it in the barn and left the gas on and it flooded the motor. I fount that out when I tried to drop start it and it would't turn over. We pumped that out but in the process of that the kickstart recoil spring broke while we were turning it over without the sparkplug in it. It's odd that it broke when there was no force on it at all. We got it started and drove it back to the barn. Now we have taken apart the transmission and got the old spring out. We have discovered that parts are really hard to find but luckily we have found the all the parts we need. I'll keep you posted with the progress of the bike. I'll post some transmission pics later as they are not handy. Yall like the means of transportation🤣
  2. Tho i love the 230f, but i think it's time for Change. I love change even if its not for the better. We got a new president, why can't we get an all new 230f? Something with inverted forks or XR250R forks, Sub-frame disconnect, aluminum dog bone, fuel injection, rear disk brake, plugs for a oil cooler, for an option for over the counter oil cooler, and a 55" wheel base. Ok I maybe I'm not asking for an all new 230f but one that meets the modern times. Give it 233cc and call it a 240. I was at Malcolm Smith's in Riverside California about a week ago. I never see the 230f on the show room floor. Also i never see it on the show room floor at Chaparral's in San Bernardino. As we know Chaparral is most likely the largest motor cycle store in the world. I think the 230f has been in production for 16 years now. So it's about time for a make over wouldn't you guys think? I'm not saying we shouldn't love the 230f because it still has practical use. Something new doesn't mean we will forget something older. Remember we still love the XR200, XR250R and the XR400 tho they're out of production. There's only so much life in a man before he kicks the bucket, so my concept is to see something new as often as possible before i push up daisies....And no I'm not talking about Daisy Dukes, but that can be nice too lol. Just don't get caught by the ball N' chain lol. BOYS IT'S TIME TO GET A NEw Hat, new boots and straw to go along with it, and it should be named XR240F http://i.ebayimg.com/00/s/NDUwWDgwMA==/z/XYEAAOSwdzVXp0Ap/$_80.JPG
  3. PICKERINGTON, OH - January 17, 2017 - (Motor Sports Newswire) - The American Motorcyclist Association strongly objects to a federal agency's attempt to tack a 100 percent or higher tariff on motorcycles made in Europe as part of a trade battle over hormones in U.S. beef. The Office of United States Trade Representative requested comments on Dec. 28 regarding its proposal to include tariffs on motorcycles with an engine size between 51cc and 500cc imported from the European Union. The American Motorcyclist Association opposes the proposed tariff, because trade disputes residing within the boundaries of the agricultural industry should not be solved with trade sanctions levied against non-agricultural products. "There is no logical link between motorcycles and beef," said Wayne Allard, AMA vice president of government relations. "It is absurd to even consider such a move. The Office of the U.S. Trade Representative is responsible for developing and coordinating U.S. international trade, commodity and direct investment policy and overseeing negotiations with other countries. The head of USTR is the U.S. Trade Representative, a Cabinet member who serves as the president's principal trade adviser, negotiator, and spokesperson on trade issues. If the agency enacts this motorcycle tariff, serious and potentially irreversible harm will be done to American small- and medium-sized business owners selling the vehicles and to American families who buy these motorcycles for commuting and outdoor recreation. "Should the availability of motorcycles be hindered by these unjustified trade sanctions, dealerships may close, leaving countless Americans without jobs," Allard said. "The negative effects of the proposed sanctions will not only harm the motorcycle sales industry, but will spread through the aftermarket equipment sector, recreation equipment sales, the sports entertainment industry and further down the line." Affected manufacturers include Aprilla, Beta. BMW, Ducati, Fantic, Gas Gas, Husqvarna, KTM, Montesa, Piaggio, Scorpa, Sherco, TM and Vespa. The same agency tried the same tactic in 2008, but the effort was thwarted when the AMA, the Motorcycle Industry Council and bike manufacturers and retailers rallied motorcyclists against the plan. At that time, the U.S. Trade Representative instead raised the tariff on a variety of European food products. About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world's largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders' interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com. Not a member? Join the AMA today. Source: American Motorcyclist Association
  4. Nineteen events to take place across the country PICKERINGTON, OH - January 17, 2017 - (Motor Sports Newswire) - Thousands of AMA members search for new trails to ride and sights to see on their dirt bikes each year. The AMA National Dual Sport Series, sponsored by Beta for the third consecutive year, boasts 19 two-day events for 2017. "The AMA National Dual Sport Series traces its roots back to 1987 and has been providing an avenue for some of the country's top dual sports to be featured at the national level," said AMA Recreational Riding and Volunteer Manager Marie Wuelleh. "AMA-chartered clubs and promoters organize thousands of miles of trail for AMA members to enjoy on their dual-sport machines every year. The noncompetitive events often include meals, a t-shirt, after-ride activities, camping, camaraderie and more. Be sure to mark an event, or several, on your calendar for this year." The AMA oversees the series, which provides great riding trails and features additional perks for participants. Every rider will be entered to win a Beta motorcycle in a year-end sweepstakes. "Beta is proud to be the title sponsor of the AMA Dual Sport Series," said Beta Marketing Manager Tim Pilg. "We see the importance of being a part of the series as it has grown over the past few years. We have been working hard developing our RR-S models, and it has been nice to see more and more Beta riders signed up every year." Supporting sponsors of the series include ADVMoto, Seat Concepts, Sena and Sidi. The 2017 schedule includes: March 3-5: Devil's Creek Dual Sport Dixie Dual Sport - Brooksville, Fla. March 18-19: 2 Sun Adventure 2017 Tucson Dual Sport, LLC - Amado, Ariz. June 3-4: Show Me 200 National Dual Sport Ride Midwest Trail Riders Association - Bixby, Mo. June 3-4: Black Dog Northwest Tour & Trail - Hood River, Ore. June 10-11: Durty Dabbers Great Adventure Dual Sport Durty Dabbers - Lock Haven, Pa. June 10-11: 2017 Ride for Research Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders - Wabeno, Wis. June 24-25: Big Bear Run Big Bear Trail Riders - Big Bear, Calif. July 15-16: Mountain Madness Dual Sport and Adventure Rally Coconino Trail Riders - Flagstaff, Ariz. Aug. 19-20: Rat Dog Northwest Tour & Trail - Tillamook, Ore. Sept. 9-10: LBL 200 National Dual Sport K T Riders - Golden Pond, Ky. Sept. 9-10: Baby Burr Dual Sport Enduro Riders Association - McArthur, Ohio Sept. 23-24: 2017 Big Woods 200 Wisconsin Dual Sport Riders - Wabeno, Wis. Sept. 23-24: 2017 Yosemite Dual Sport Adventure Family Off-Road Adventures - Buck Meadows, Calif. Sept. 30-Oct. 1 (pending U.S. Forest Service permit): Shenandoah 500 Washington Area Trail Riders - Mount Solon, Va. Oct. 14-15: Buffalo 500 National Dual Sport Stoney Lonesome Motorcycle Club - Columbus, Ind. Oct. 21-22: Howlin' at the Moon Arizona Trail Riders - Payson, Ariz. Nov. 4-5: Hammer Run Tri-County Sportsmen - Port Elizabeth, N.J. Nov. 18-19: There Will Be Dust Trail Riders of Southern Arizona - Tucson, Ariz. Nov. 24-25: L.A. - Barstow to Vegas AMA District 37 Dual Sport - Palmdale, Calif. The series schedule and detailed information about the events can be viewed at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/Riding/Dual-Sport-Riding. Be sure to follow the series official Facebook page at www.facebook.com/AMADualSport. Post your photos from the events using #AMAdualsport on social media.
  5. New to the site and I have picked up a 1998 yz400f for $400 from a buddy which I cannot seem to get to idle. (He couldn't get it to run right either which is how I picked it up so cheap) Have read up some on this issue but I have a few more things to take into account that may help yall to guide me in the right direction. Granted I am coming from 2 strokes and am fairly new to 4 strokes but have good mechanical knowledge. I have taken the Keihin flat cr carb off and completely cleaned it inside and out. All jets have been thoroughly cleaned to the point I could see very good light through them. Nothing was really dirty at all in the carb but cleaned it all anyway. Didn't lose any springs or o rings or the little washer from the idle/mixture screw on the bottom of the carb. I read that this screw should be 1.5 to 2 turns out and I set it at a tiny bit more that 1.5 turns out last night and put the carb back on and the bike fired right off second kick (even without the choke on) but it still will not idle. I have adjusted the black plastic idle screw on the side of the carb and it seems to have no effect whatsoever. Made sure that the tps sensor went back on the same angle it came off. The bike backfires bad on decel and shoots fireballs out the exhaust when it's dark out. Now the thing to take into account which may or may not help you lead me in the right direction with my bike is that ever since I bought this bike it has been missing the hot start button and hoses. All that is there is the hot start housing bolted to the frame. Any and all help will be greatly appreciated.
  6. I have a 05 yz450f and it ceases to scare me. Is there any mods I can make that don't hinder reliability? The engine is completely stock with a Big Gun and a k@n filter. I'm running a 15/46 sprocket combo.
  7. Federal trade agency proposes higher import fees on certain motorcycles Voice your opinion today! Take Action **If you receive an "Internal Error" after you submit your comments, please hit the "Back" button on your browser and resubmit.** The Office of United States Trade Representative requested comments on Dec. 28 regarding its proposal to include tariffs on motorcycles imported from the European Union with an engine size between 51cc and 500cc in the E.U. - U.S. beef hormone trade dispute. The deadline to submit comments is Jan. 30. The American Motorcyclist Association opposes the proposed tariff, because trade disputes residing within the boundaries of the agricultural industry should not be solved with trade sanctions levied against non-agricultural products. Specifically, a 100 percent, or higher, tariff on these motorcycles is proposed. This will cause serious and potentially irreversible harm to American small- and medium-sized business owners selling the vehicles. Additionally, consumers will be denied access to certain models of competition and recreational motorcycles that contribute to the lifestyle and wellbeing of millions of American families. Manufacturers that will be impacted: 1) Aprilla; 2) Beta; 3) BMW; 4) Ducati; 5) Fantic; 6) Gas Gas; 7) Husqvarna; 9) KTM; 10) Montesa; 11) Piaggio; 12) Scorpa; 13) Sherco; 14) TM; and 15) Vespa. Should the availability of product be hindered through unjustified trade sanctions on European-produced motorcycles, dealerships may close, leaving countless Americans without jobs.The negative effects of the proposed trade sanctions will not only harm the motorcycle sales industry, but will spread through the aftermarket equipment sector, recreation equipment sales, the sports entertainment industry and further down the line. You can do something to prevent this from happening! Use the AMA's easy to use tools to submit comments to the USTR by Jan. 30 to say you oppose the idea to penalize motorcyclists in the beef trade dispute. Make our voice stronger by sharing the AMA alert. Share with your friends on Facebook. Now more than ever, it is crucial that you and your riding friends become members of the AMA to help protect our riding freedoms. More members mean more clout against the opponents of motorcycling. That support will help fight for your rights - on the road, trail and racetrack and in the halls of government. If you are a motorcycle rider, join the AMA at www.americanmotorcyclist.com/membership/join. Take Action
  8. I have a 2000 YZ250 that I plan on racing in my first ever harescramble on March 12. The bike is completely stock, although I am ordering some g2 ergonomics hand guards. It also has works connection from guards. What would you guys recomend for pre race prep (things to check) and any other advice you can give me, thanks.
  9. Saw this today on the motocross action fb page.....coming up next week at the Mecums auction in Vegas......a whole lot of bikes to be auctioned, including 3 brand spanking new 07 CR250's still in crates! I didnt think there would be any left in crates, i wonder how high they'll go?
  10. Hello I've been having issue trying to pin down an exhaust to purchase I ride predominantly off road on my drz400e aus spec (exhaust noise non issue) and I've limited my chooses to an mrd zpro and a rs3 full system Does the mrd shift the torque so the pull starts later not sooner due to it being free flowing Is the rs3 more suitable on dirt than a zpro Price Wise I can get the rs3 full system for $715AUD and the mrd Zpro is $788AUD Shipped+plus with all the extra bits In the future I will do some engine mods but before those will be suspension.
  11. Does anyone know how I can get my ttr 125 to sound better, I don't want to spend 200 bucks on a fmf pipe or something like that, anyone know any mods I can do to it while maintaining my spark arrestor and green sticker status, anyone tried one of those chinese clamp on mufflers from ebay ?
  12. Husqvarna Motorcycles announces all-new MY17 motocross line-up May 10, 2016 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Husqvarna Motorcycles is proud to introduce the 2017 TC and FC range of motocross models – one of the most sophisticated range of 2-stroke and 4-stroke machines on the market today. Using their global engagement in top-level racing to further improve the entire motocross line-up, together with extensive research and development Husqvarna Motorcycles’ 2017 TC 125, TC 250, FC 250, FC 350, FC 450 and TC 85 models remain true to the brand’s commitment to deliver premium motorcycles with state-of-the-art technology. 2017 TC 250 Engine Featuring all-new WP Performance Systems AER 48 front forks, traction control, a new from the ground up TC 250 2-stroke as well as further advances in engine management and high-tech componentry throughout, Husqvarna Motorcycles offer machinery that supports riders in all situations. 2-STROKE FANS REJOICE Considerable energy has gone into the development of the all-new Husqvarna TC 250, which together with the smaller capacity TC 85 and TC 125 machines make up the complete line-up of 2-stroke models. 2017 TC 250 The 2017 TC 250 represents the continued development of the historic 250 cc 2-stroke within Husqvarna’s motocross line-up. With a significant reduction in overall weight together with improved agility it features a completely redesigned, lightweight engine that offers increased efficiency, optimised centralisation of masses as well as substantial vibration reduction. The TC 250 is now smaller, lighter and smoother. 2017 TC 125 A favourite among 125 cc 2-stroke lovers, the TC 125 is designed having premium performance and quality in mind. The all-new WP AER 48 forks, the new Mikuni TMX 38 mm carburettor and the Magura hydraulic clutch all ensure the 2017 TC 125 remains one step ahead of the competition. Built for future motocross champions Husqvarna’s TC 85 receives new, stylish colours and graphics, which aesthetically bring it even closer to its larger capacity siblings. THE FUTURE IS NOW Introducing further engine developments, Husqvarna Motorcycles ensure all motors continue to set a higher benchmark in terms of reduced weight, design and performance, in all categories. 2017 FC 450 Across the 4-stroke model range the refined Keihin engine management system is designed to process data faster, offering an all-new traction control for 2017. Analysing throttle input and sudden increases in RPM, the sensors registers any loss of grip to reduce power to the rear wheel, ensuring maximum traction. With integrated launch control for perfect starts, the EMS also features selectable engine maps via a switch on the handlebars. The Keihin 44 mm throttle body is positioned accordingly to ensure the most efficient flow into the combustion chamber. Thanks to the elimination of a throttle linkage, the response to any throttle movement is more immediate. 2017 FC 350 Ideally matching the characteristics of each engine while keeping their overall weight to a minimum all exhaust systems comply with the necessary FIM noise limits for motocross racing. Header pipes on the 4-strokes feature resonance chambers for improved power delivery, with the FC 450 having its resonance chamber integrated into the header pipe. 2017 FC 250 All 4-stroke models come with electric starters as standard, which are combined with lightweight and powerful Li-Ion batteries for easy and reliable starting. REACHING NEW HEIGHTS Built by WP Performance Systems the hydro-formed chromium molybdenum frame is designed with calculated parameters of longitudinal and torsional flex to ensure superior handling and easy manoeuvrability. To further enhance suspension functionality and improve overall chassis feeling all 4-strokes feature new, lightweight aluminium engine mounts. Developed to perfectly match the chassis characteristics are the all-new WP AER 48 front forks, featured across the new 2017 Husqvarna range. Super lightweight, easily adjustable and offering an incredible amount of feedback to the rider no matter the conditions, the WP AER 48 forks reach new heights in terms of suspension technology. Unique to Husqvarna’s models is the three-piece composite subframe made of 30% carbon fibre, which as well as being incredibly strong weighs just 1.4 kg. Attached to the frame is an innovative self-cleaning footpeg mount preventing dirt from building up in muddy conditions or when riding in deep ruts. As a result the footpegs always springs back to their original position. A high-quality clutch system made by Magura ensures near maintenance-free operation and perfect clutch engagement in every condition. The ODI lock-on grips come together with a pioneering throttle assembly with easy free-play adjustment and the ability to alter throttle progression by changing a cam. 2017 FC 450 Engine Finally the WP radiators, 7-litre polythene fuel tanks, the tool-less airbox design and the DID alloy rims with CNC machined hubs ensure that the new 2017 Husqvarna motocross line-up is among the most advanced on the market. The new Husqvarna MY17 motocross range will be available worldwide from June 2016 at all authorised Husqvarna Motorcycles Dealers. For all details on pricing and availability, please refer to your national Husqvarna Motorcycles Subsidiary or Importer. What’s New In Husqvarna MY17 Motocross Models* New from the ground up TC 250 2-stroke model All-new WP AER 48 mm forks CNC Upper Triple Clamp Handlebar support Traction Control on the 4-stroke engines Map switch on the 4-stroke models Bodywork with new Colour Trim and Graphics Dunlop MX-3S Tyres Rear tyre FC 250 (110 instead of 100) Cylinder head mountings on the 4-stroke models (made of aluminium instead of steel) Rear brake lever (10 mm longer) Rear brake pads (different material) 38 mm Mikuni TMX carburettor on the TC 125 (previously Keihin) * the below listed news are valid for all models – where not differently specified – except the TC 85
  13. PICKERINGTON, OH - February 15, 2016 - (Motor Sports Newswire) - When Ben Horgen of Rochester, Minn., learned that the 1986 Honda CR250R that he won in an AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame raffle was an original-condition runner, he was thrilled. "Bikes aren't meant to sit and look at," said the 15-year AMA member. "Bikes are meant to be ridden. I'm looking forward to taking this one to a vintage race this year for sure." 1986 Honda CR250R raffle Horgen, who races hare scrambles, motocross, flat track and ATV motocross, was randomly drawn as the winner of the Honda CR250R raffle bike during the 2015 AMA Championship Banquet held in Columbus, Ohio, on Jan. 23. “I was reading the AMA Extra e-newsletter, saw there was a raffle and bought a ticket online,” Horgen said. “I really wasn’t planning on winning the bike. I was just sitting at home, thinking about racing, and saw it as a way to support the Hall of Fame museum. I want to make sure my little ones, who are 1 and zero, can grow up and see these old bikes at the museum.” All proceeds from the raffle help fund the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame, a 501©(3) non-profit that is located on the AMA campus in Pickerington, Ohio. Each year, the Hall of Fame raises money with raffles of cool motorcycles, including original survivors, restored classics and cutting-edge customs. Currently, the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame is raffling a 1947 Indian Chief. One of the most classic and recognizable American motorcycles of 20th Century, this vintage Indian Chief, with its muscular V-twin engine and deeply skirted fenders, is an iconic machine that has always stood apart from the crowd. You can receive one chance to win the Indian for a $5 donation, or receive five chances for a $20 donation. Donations may be made at http://www.motorcyclemuseum.org. You must be 18 years or older and a resident of the United States to win. The winning ticket will be drawn during AMA Vintage Motorcycle Days at Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course in Lexington, Ohio, July 8-10. About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders’ interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com. Not a member? Join the AMA today.
  14. October 28, 2015 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Husqvarna Motorcycles, the brand with a hugely successful tradition in offroad, is taking a major step into the dual-purpose and mid-size adventure bike market with the launch of the new 701 ENDURO model. Utilising its vast knowledge of offroad competition bikes, Husqvarna Motorcycles returns to the street dual sport segment with the 701 ENDURO – continuing the brand’s more than 100-year heritage in all motorcycle divisions. Faithfull to the iconic brand’s core values, the 701 ENDURO is a machine built from the ground up to lead in terms of power, weight, technology and performance. Combining state-of-the-art equipment with unique bodywork, it offers functional Swedish-inspired design. Bred from decades of enduro world championship-winning success the 701 ENDURO has the ability to master both urban environments and demanding offroad terrain with equal composure, ensuring impressive levels of versatility. Featuring class-leading technology the 690 cc engine, which produces 67 hp, has a double spark plug ignition, selectable engine maps and ride-by-wire throttle, which combined provides a perfectly linear power delivery. With its crisp throttle response the engine allows riders of all levels to confidently tackle both their next offroad adventure as well as the daily commute aboard the 701 ENDURO. Reliability, durability and efficiency are guaranteed by high-tech applications such as the active crankcase evacuation and the forced lubrication system, which reduce oil friction and pump losses. The adoption of these innovative solutions brings long 10,000 km service intervals and extremely low fuel consumption. The 701 Enduro has innovative bodywork featuring a long seat that reaches over the radiator shrouds with functional ribbing to improve grip in all conditions. The in-mould graphics on the subframe protect the integrated fuel tank while also ensuring an elegant look to the rear of the bike. Tightly wrapped around the engine and frame, the 701’s bodywork is ergonomically designed to connect the rider’s body to the bike. Made of high-grade chromium-molybdenum steel the 701 ENDURO’s lightweight trellis frame has been developed to offer optimum feedback for both on road and offroad use. Combining a perfect weight distribution with a tight turning circle the trellis frame harnesses the power of the single-cylinder engine, guaranteeing flawless agility and stability in all kinds of riding conditions. WP Performance has tuned the closed-cartridge 4CS forks specifically for the 701 ENDURO, which find their perfect match in the fully-adjustable WP rear shock. For perfect all-terrain riding capabilities both front and rear suspension offer 275 mm of travel. A super lightweight die-cast aluminium swingarm matches with the self-supporting polyamide rear subframe to further enhance the bike’s astounding power-to-weight ratio. For optimal weight distribution, and long ride peace of mind, a 13-litre fuel tank is integrated into the subframe. A set of anodised CNC machined triple clamps with precisely engineered flex adds to the 701 ENDURO’s extensive list of superior quality components. The advanced ABS system with offroad specific settings, Brembo brakes and the hydraulically operated slipper clutch guarantee total control in all conditions. The 701 ENDURO comes with high-quality black DID rims as standard, fitted with tried and tested Continental TKC 80 tyres on the 21’’ (front) and 18’’ (rear) wheels. With the specific A2 engine map that limits power to 30kW, the 701 ENDURO can be ridden by A2 licence holders (dependant on country regulation outside EU) hoping to become true world travelers. An extensive range of specially developed Husqvarna Motorcycles’ Accessories further improves the 701 ENDURO’s formidable capabilities. Premium quality enhancements to style and performance allow riders to tailor the 701 ENDURO to their specific needs. Additionally, within its Clothing range Husqvarna offers purposely designed clothing for 701 riders. The Husqvarna 701 ENDURO will be available from November 2015 (February 2016 in the US and Canada) at authorised Husqvarna Motorcycles Dealers. The official retail price will be further communicated by the national Husqvarna Motorcycles subsidiary or Importer. 701 ENDURO HIGHLIGHTS Ergonomically designed, innovative bodywork. 67 hp single-cylinder engine featuring latest technologies in design and electronics. Chromium-molybdenum trellis frame optimised for precise handling and total rider confidence. Competition-level WP 4CS fork and WP rear shock for outstanding control and adjustability. Extremely low-weight aluminium swingarm designed to ensure the highest levels of traction and stability. Polyamide self-supporting rear subframe with integrated 13-litre fuel tank. Keihin 46mm electronic fuel injection with ride-by-wire throttle actuation for impeccable response. Switchable engine maps to perfectly adapt engine characteristics according to conditions. Cutting-edge switchable ABS with specific offroad mode. APTC slipper clutch for maximum control under hard braking. Extensive range of Accessories to further enhance the bike’s characteristics and performance. Specific (optional) engine map that limits power making the 701 ENDURO A2-legal (EU)
  15. After experiencing some overheating while going slow in rough terrain I decided to try a cheap fix and install a couple of cooling fans. Here are some photos of my fan installation. The fans are not sealed but since they are brush-less DC fans, unless some debris gets in them they should not be affected by the environment. The fans are fairly inexpensive draw very little current and easy to replace if they fail. The fans are held on the radiator by zip ties. I inserted one zip tie through each of the radiator side mounting holes of the fan then passed the zip ties through the fins if the radiator and secured them with the clipped-off head of another zip tie. The 2006 250 xc-w does not appear to have a 12vdc circuit. It does have an output from the generator that I assume is alternating current. Since the stock regulator only has one wire going to it and ground on the other side I suspect is just a zener diode, that acts as a voltage limiter shunting anything over a certain voltage to ground. If that is the case the AC generator output would be fine for lights and a horn, but not a Direct Current Fan. I installed a inexpensive (cheap) aftermarket regulator/rectifier, inserting it between the generator and the rest of the KTM's electrical circuit. You can see the voltage regulator in the attached photos. The regulator/rectifier provides 12vdc to the fans, horn, lights and the battery. The battery pack is a ni-mh 1800 mha 12vdc, NOT lithium-ion. I opted for the ni-mh because there is less of a fire hazard in-case the voltage regulator goes nuts. The battery is connected to the rest of the circuit with a 7.5 amp fuse and is intended to act as a voltage conditioner. If the voltage provided by the regulator has any rpm related spikes, or dips, the battery should absorb the spikes by charging, and fill any dips by discharging. Or at least that's the plan. The battery also powers the fans if the radiators are still hot when the engine is not running. The fans are activated by an appliance thermo-snap switch. This switch is a normally open bi-metal switch that closes at 85c (185f). It is designed to switch 120vac at 8 amps. That is an order of magnitude more current then the fans require, so they are not likely to fail due to current draw. If it fails it will probably be a result of exceeding the cycle life of the switch and I have NO idea of how many cycles to failure this switch is rated for. It is attached to the radiator just below the radiator cap near the hot coolant in hose using JB weld epoxy adhesive. The switch activates after the stock thermostat opens fully and the coolant temp at the top of the radiator exceeds 85c. Since installing the fans, a coolant recovery bottle and a 1.8 bar radiator cap, even though I have been riding harder, I have not experienced any steam from overheating. I have seen the coolant recovery bottle over half full. So the cooling system with the fans running has gotten hot enough to overpressure the 1.8 bar radiator cap and over flow coolant into the recovery bottle, but it did not over flow the bottle, and all of the coolant was returned to the radiator as soon as the bike cooled. The fact that the coolant bottle did have coolant overflow in it is proof that the fans and 1.8 bar radiator cap are not a total cure to overheating. Though as I said overheating has happened far fewer times even though I'm riding more and harder than last year. The thermo-snap switch ensures that the whole system is automatic requiring no input from the rider. The fans turn on and off according to radiator temperature whether the engine is running or not. The fan system weighs less than 1 kg (2 lbs). All in all I am very satisfied with the way it works. I know the wiring is a rats nest. It was pretty much a proof of concept job. My son was going to clean it up and give it a more professional look, but I haven't gotten it over to him yet (1year+) >>> See my coolant recovery bottle system HERE.
  16. November 14, 2014 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – In order to celebrate KTḾs successful enduro racing season, the ultra-cool 2015 KTM EXC FACTORY EDITION range, with various upgrades over the standard models, are now available to purchase in KTM dealers. KTM 300 EXC Factory Edition With KTM being the dominant brand in enduro racing, and following on from more success in the Enduro World Championship with Christophe Nambotin and Matthew Phillips taking the title wins in E1 and E3 along with many individual and national titles during 2014, KTM is excited to announce the release of its limited edition MY 2015 KTM EXC FACTORY EDITION machines. KTM 350 EXC-F Factory Edition Compared to the standard versions, these special models have received various detail upgrades with parts and accessories designed to the very highest level by KTM’s R&D department in Mattighofen, Austria. The increased specification of the FACTORY EDITION machines include genuine factory graphics, orange CNC triple clamps and a factory seat with SDV logos, which offers riders the chance to truly feel like a factory racer. KTM 350 EXC-F Factory Edition In addition to that, the bikes are fitted with an orange rear sprocket, engine guard, and newly developed Metzeler FIM tyres. To finish off the full factory look, the bikes also boast a striking orange frame, with orange radiators and fork guards that all make the bike almost visually indistinguishable from the true factory race machines and are sure to make these special editions stand out from the crowd. The EXC FACTORY EDITION model range 2015 is available in the following models: KTM 125 EXC Factory Edition, KTM 250 EXC Factory Edition, KTM 300 EXC Factory Edition, KTM 450 EXC Factory Edition, KTM 250 EXC-F Factory Edition and the KTM 350 EXC-F Factory Edition. The bikes are arriving now in international KTM dealers. WWW.KTM.COM
  17. 1. Compression & rebound are pretty self-explanatory. Compression is when the suspension collapses/compresses and rebound is when it extends/rebounds. Most dirt/trail/enduro/mx bikes have adjustable (to a degree) suspensions. Generally the external adjustments include: low-speed compression (on forks & shocks), high-speed compression (usually only shocks), low-speed rebound (on forks & shocks) and spring preload (on forks & shocks). Internally damping is adjustable via shim stacks, bleed ports, pistons, etc… Generally low-speed compression and rebound are adjusted with what are known as "clickers" (on the DRZ they look like flat-headed screws, with only the head visible). When you adjust them, you move a needle (right in image below) that sits within an orifice (left in image below). Under low-speed movement of the suspension, some of the fluid inside moves through these orifices. By adjusting the clicker "IN" (generally clockwise) you partially close off that orifice. The more you adjust "IN" the more it closes the orifice. By closing the orifice, it takes more energy for the fluid to pass through because essentially you are making the orifice or hole smaller. So for compression it makes the suspension collapse slower (feels firmer) and for rebound it makes the suspension extend slower. The inverse is true when you adjust the clicker "OUT". It's important to note, that the range of these clickers is limited. If you find yourself at the limits of their adjustment, then you need to revalve the suspension. Spring rate, is a way to quantify a spring and it simply means the amount of force it takes to compress the spring x amount of inches. So a stock DRZ400S/SM rear spring is 5.5 kg/mm, meaning it takes 5.5 kg of force to compress the spring 1 mm. If the spring is linear, then it'll take an additional 5.5 kg to compress another mm and so on (11 kg for 2 mm, 16.5 kg for 3 mm, etc…). 2. At 230 lbs you need firmer springs both for the shock and forks. That'll run you around $200, no adjustment will compensate for springs that are way too soft for your weight. And no, adding more preload is not the answer… Then as far as re-valving, if you're a DIY kind of guy, you can make changes to improve the damping (I did myself). You will however need a few shims to make those changes as the stock valving is very soft.
  18. Recently acquired a low-hour 2005 WR450 and was faced with having to un-do the half assed attempt at AIS removal the previous owner had done. A real horror show that leaked badly and it had to go in favor of a proper permanent solution. The GYTR AIS removal kit for the 2005-6 WR450s is a dodgy solution also, relying on clamping a cap on the 90 degree elbow coming out of the cylinder head. There used to be pre-made options for AIS removal on these bikes, but now those are all gone except for the GYTR kit. The solutions that are no longer available consisted of a plug that was driven into the hole in the head left after removing the pipe elbow. A much better solution than the GYTR kit. Some will say the GYTR kit is nice because it includes a needle and throttle stop, but the value there is dubious considering that you can just cut the throttle stop and many folks (myself included) opt for the JD jetting kit so that makes the GYTR needle and jets unnecessary. So, faced with not wanting to lay out $50 for the GYTR kit and its weak answer to the problem I set out to find an acceptable substitute for the plugs that are no longer available. Behold the solution: Dorman part number 555-106 freeze plugs, a whopping 39 cents each at O'Reilly Auto Parts. These are 12.1mm oil gallery plugs. The hole in the head is 12mm, and these fit perfectly. Actually a bit tighter than the pipe elbow I removed. One plug installed: There is a lip at the bottom of the hole that prevents them from being driven in too far. The hole is deep enough to accept as many as three plugs, but that is definitely overkill. As tightly as they fit, one should be plenty but erring on the side of caution and just wanting to fill the hole up so it doesn't collect a lot of mud and dirt I installed a second one: These are not coming out without a drill and a slide hammer. This is the proper, permanent solution to this problem! For the small vacuum fitting on the head near the carb, a standard rubber vacuum cap is sufficient. Also for the airbox, a 1/2 inch rubber vacuum cap took care of that. Total investment: Dorman 555-106 plugs: .39 each, .78 total Pack of assorted vacuum caps: 3.49 Total: $4.27 Less than 1/10 the price of the GTYR kit, and a MUCH better solution in my opinion!
  19. I did the fix last night and took some pics and notes to make this easy on people that haven't done it and want more detail. Please chime in if you think I've missed something. Required Tools: Set of Allen wrenches #3 Phillips screwdriver small flat head screwdriver 8 & 10 mm sockets 13 mm open end wrench (I needed this to remove my skid plate) snap ring pliers gasket scraper compressed air Required Parts: New clutch cover gasket, Suzuki Part # 11482-29F00 Tube or can of RTV sealant Oil filter and oil (if you plan to change the oil) 1. Remove your skid plate (if you have one). I have a Tonn's skid plate and it was in the way. 2. Remove right side radiator cover. 3. Unbolt the rear brake lever. This will require removing a cotter pin on the backside of the bolt, and then the bolt itself. I was able to swing the lever far enough out of the way without completely removing it from the bike (see pic). 4. Drain the coolant. This requires removing the radiator cap and the small bolt on the water pump, which has an aluminum washer on it. I rocked the bike from side to side to get most of the coolant out of the bike. 5. The oil, two options here. You can either drain the oil and remove the oil filter or you can do what I did which is lay the bike on its left side to keep the oil from pouring out of the engine when you remove the clutch cover. I still removed the oil filter so I could clean the clutch cover with brake clean after scraping the old gasket off. 6. Loosen the hose clamp on the coolant hose that attaches to the top of the water pump and fold the hose out of the way. 7. Remove the water pump cover and the clutch cover by removing the bolts holding them on. Note that some of the bolts are of different sizes so keep track of which hole you pulled them from. Also, not all of the bolts need be removed, see the pic below. 8. Remove the old gasket from the clutch cover and/or the engine with your gasket scraper. I then cleaned the clutch cover with brake cleaner as it was fairly oily. 9. With your snap ring pliers, remove the snap ring from the plastic gear on the clutch cover seen here: 10. Remove the plastic gear. 11. Push out the metal pin and remove the washer underneath as seen here: 12. With a screwdriver or whatever your preferred tool, remove the “E” clip as seen here: 13. After removing the “E” clip push the water pump shaft out of the clutch cover. 14. You will now have the part in your hand that needs fixing. Remove the porcelain gasket at the bottom of the shaft by blowing it with compressed air. Don’t not pry it with a screwdriver as it could damage the gasket. Mine was stuck fairly well so I sprayed some WD-40 on first to loosen it up. 15. If you used WD-40 clean the shaft and gasket with some brake cleaner and then apply the RTV sealant to this area (I reused this pic as its perfect): 16. Push the gasket back down flush on the shaft wiping away any excess RTV that may flow out. 17. Reassemble the shaft into the clutch cover in reverse order as listed in steps 9-13. 18. Place your new clutch cover gasket on the engine and then place the cover back onto the bike. 19. Put the bolts back into the clutch and water pump cover and tighten equally. I could not find a torque setting for these in the manual so I snugged them evenly. 20. Put the oil filter or a new one in the bike and put the oil filter cover back on. 21. Re-attach the brake lever and tighten the bolt to 21 ft lbs. Be sure to install a new cotter pin on the backside of the bolt. 22. If you drained your oil, refill the crankcase with the proper amount. If you didn’t drain the oil be sure you have enough in the crankcase from oil lost from removing the clutch cover. 23. Let bike sit for 24 hours to let the RTV set up before adding coolant. 24. Re-attach the coolant hose to the top of the water pump and tighten the hose clamp. 25. Fill the radiator with a “Silicate Free” anti-freeze and put the radiator cap back on and tighten the radiator cap screw. 26. Put the radiator cover and your skid plate back on the bike. 27. You are done, go ride!
  20. EDIT "Rear hubs are all the same from 1992 to 2007 125 on up The 125s and 250s got the right hub as of 1990 but the bigger bikes didn't use them till 1992." KTM wheels FIT. I have had people asking me about this for quite some time now so I thought id throw this together. First YES KTM wheels fit. Rear hubs are all the same from 1990 to 2007 125 on up. Only difference is Cush drive or not and rim size. I now have 3 different KTM rear wheels that I run A 17” 18” and 19”. The 18” is from a 1995 LC4. The 19” is actually a tallen hub but its for a 2002 KTM 400. The 17 is from a 2004 4XX (don’t remember). I have take pics of all the different rear wheels on my bike to show. Notice that the 18” and 17” both have the cush drive hub. The spacers rotors and sprockets are all stock KTM. This is a direct bolt up fitment. Do note that the KTM rear rotor is the same size as a 400S/E 220mm. The 18” The 19” The 17”
  21. For Many of the CRF electric owners or anyone who has used the X model taillight, it has probably gone out on you. Well I have an easy fix to save the cost of a new one just by replacing the resistor's in the lights. By my judgement, Honda used two 100 ohm resistors to create the necessary resistance which is about 20 ohms too little by calculations. They would burn out and make the light useless. I have an easy, inexpensive fix for about 5 dollars, and if your LED's are still good it's only about 1 dollar. There are two ways to do this, one is two go with the stock system with 2 100ohm resistors, or you can just use 1 220ohm resistor. If you do the stock system you will need four 100 ohm 1/8 watt resistors. If you do the other choice you need two 220 ohm resistors. What You Will Need: All of these parts you can get at RadioShack which is the only place I know of to get stuff like this 1) 4 White LED's 3.3V 25mA (If LED's still work you won't need them 2) Option A) 4 100ohm 1/8watt resistors Option 👍 2 220ohm 1/4watt resistors 3)Utility Knife 4)Soldering Iron 5)Rosin Core Solder 6)Philips Screw Driver 1) Here are the resistors and LED's you can buy from radioshack. Choose which way you want to go with on the resistor's and you'll buy just those. Each pack of resistor's is only 99 cents and the LED's are 2 dollars for a pack of 2. 2) Set your Light out on your work area. You will want to remove the terminals from the clip and slide the protective tubing down or completely off of the wires. Take a utility knife and not going anymore than about 1/8" down seperate the black pastic from the clear red lens. It's not going to pop off just by cutting it because there is a lip that goes into the housing. 3) Hopefully you can do this step without breaking the plastic. I had no problems and hopefully you won't either. Take a couple pair of pliers (preferably crescent wrenches) and position them about how I have them. Pry one pair of pliers in a scissors action and hopefully you can separate the two pieces. 4) Now the pieces are separated. You can see the lip I was talking about. Hopefully you were able to make it to this step with no breaking. 5) Now remove the two screws that hold the board onto the housing. 6) As You can see the two resistor's are burnt to a crisp. There's also melted plastic pegs that they use to help hold the board down even more. You will need to break the board away from the housing. 7) Take a screwdriver and pry the board up to break the board away from the housing but don't break anything. Using your soldering iron to melt the plastic and then pry it off might be a safer way. 8) Now pull the board away and pull the wires thru the grommet to get yourself some more room to work with. 9) Here's the back of the board. If you look closely you can see how the routing goes. It uses two series, using two LED's in a series. The positive volts goes in thru the diode (the black device in the very middle of the board) thru one LED to the next LED than thru the resistor's and to the ground. If anyone wants a good drawing of the routing just ask and I'll get one. 10) Now take your soldering iron and start removing the resistor's. Heat up the solder on one side and use needle nose pliers to work it free. 11) Make sure you pay attention to how the LED's are sitting in the board. You want to install the new one's in the same direction. 12) Here's everything out on one side. I recommend doing one side so you don't mess up how the LED's are sitting in the board. 13) I'm using the single 220 ohm resistor so my replacement will be different. If you do the double 100 ohm resistor's just install them just how they were originally 14) Get the solder hot enough and mess with a bit to get the holes to open back up. This will be much easier than trying to heat up the solder and push the resistor and LED through while keeping the solder warm. 15) Here's the one new LED and the 220ohm resistor installed. Since I'm using the larger resistor you will need to leave enough wire so you can twist it enough to be just as wide as the board. If it sticks out further than the board then it will hit the lens when you reassemble it. 16) Here's two new LED's Installed on one side and the resistor. 17) I hooked up the wire's to a power source and TADA!!!! It has lights!!! 18) Finish up the other side and now you should have all four lights working 19) Pull the wire's back through the grommet and screw the board back into the housing. You can try to melt the plastic pins back to the board if possible but probably not necessary. If you did a nice clean job it should look just like it's factory. 20) Like I said make sure if the resistor isn't wider than the board so it will clear the lens. 21) Super glue the lens back on. The lens has a slight curve to it so it has only one way to go back on so it's hard to get it back together wrong. Use rubber bands to hold it together or some sort of clamps that won't break it. Once your done it should look good as new.
  22. Hey all, I recently had a 440 kit installed in my "00XR400 and with the heavy duty clutch springs that were part of the kit, the clutch work was a little tougher than I like. So I bought a Hebo hydraulic universal clutch kit from my buddy Jim Cook at Smackover Motorsports. The reviews of it I'd read said the pull was slightly easier and longer than the Magura and quality was as good or better. Thing is, after looking around all over the web, I could find no help or suggestions on where to mount the slave cylinder on an XR. These are 3 links I used to help me, tho none of them work specifically with the XR. http://www.john-stichnoth.com/Hebo.html http://dirtrider.net/drn_tested/erider/hydrualic_clutch.html http://www.thumpertalk.com/forum/showthread.php?t=2151 So after spending a few days experimenting with different potential mounting points, keeping in mind I need to take into consideration the amount of heat the unit will see and keep it accessable yet somewhat protected, I put it on the left side of the forward main frame downtube. I fashioned a bracket that would use the left mounting point for the fuel tank. Having an IMS 4 gal tank made options scarce. Maybe if anyone else wants to do this project on an XR, between the links provided and what I'll add, it will be a little easier. I used the long cable and sheath provided in the kit, without cutting/altering it's length. And the stock style cable keeper/adjuster that uses the stock bracket mounted to the right case cover. The end of the cable is bare so you use the cable clamp provided in the kit that fits the XRs throw lever. Here's a picture of the slave cylinder mount. I used a temporary spacer setup the same thickness as the fueltank mount for initial fitting of the cylinder. I wrapped the cylinder in the same heat wrap I used on the header to help shield it from any heat. I used plastic spiral wrap on the braided line to add some abrasion and heat resistance to it. Here's final installation pictures. [ My decomp lever would no longer fit on the handlebars, so for now, until I figure out something better, I mounted it to the bark buster. Here's a tip I discovered. The bleeder nipple/fitting bolt threads are a sloppy fit. When trying to bleed the system with my vacuum bleed tool, air/vacuum escapes around the threads of the nipple and prevents the tool from working properly. I had to remove the nipple and wrap its threads with teflon tape. The system bled fine after that. Getting the amount of lever pull I needed was tricky and took me awhile to figure out. Took the bike for a spin up and down the street to check it and Man is this thing sweet! I bet it cut lever pull difficulty by 50% or more. The braided line is longer than I needed for this install and figuring out a way to route the excess and get the end clocked in the orientation I needed it was a pain. Later I might have it shortend. Hope this might help someone else that is contemplating this mod. Trailryder42
  23. So, many of you in the dirt bike scene are aware that Rekluse makes automatic clutches. The reviews on these clutches, if properly setup, have been simply awesome. Well, I must agree, they are simply awesome. I did a lot of research on this clutch before I put down the money for this clutch. Was it worth it? Absolutely! During my installation process, I took a few pictures to help anybody else who is interested in this type of clutch. Here are a few of the basic tools you will need to get the clutch installed. What you don't see in the picture (yes, I'll need to get it updated) is a dental pic tool. These are really handy when you are trying to pull the clutch packs out. Yes, it can be done with a flat tip screwdriver, but its much easier with the right tool. Here is a close up picture of the cable operated clutch actuator that sits on top of the case. Mine was kinda dirty due to a leaking seal on the front sprocket. So, lay the bike on its left side. I believe the instructions call for you to drain the oil. In my case, I didn't need to do that, as the oil moved to the low side of the case. Don't forget to remove the pin on the back side of the bolt that holds the rear brake pedal on. I though I would show you the differences in the bolt sizes for the crank case cover. The two larger ones are the same size, and then there is a 3rd one that goes with the centering pin, which is a little longer than the other 4 shorter bolts. I have never delved into the motorcycles mechanics before. However, as you can see from my web site, I'm no rookie to handling sockets. These pics are for the person who has the bike, but has yet to do any real maintenance on their bike. Here is a shot of inside the clutch cover. Here you can see the friction plates stacked up. At first, I put tape down to seal off the rest of the case from clutch. However, I found that the tape would stick to the clutch boss, and the make getting the friction plates out a little more difficult. I then moved to the back up plan; terry cloths. These worked quite well, and I was able to seal up the gaps very well. Here you can see the clutch springs coming out. These won't be used anymore. However, don't throw them away. You may end up selling the bike down the road and may want to keep your Rekluse. Here is a shot of the clutch boss and the friction plates. Here you can see the centering pins going into the clutch boss. Look closely, you can see 4 very small washers that are sitting around each centering pin. These washers are very small, don't loose them. I had, lots, and lots of washer left over. Don't be surprised. It appeared that they give you a generic bag of parts, and you use what you need from the bag. Here is the heart of the Rekluse. Here is something I found interesting, and nearly put a stop to my whole setup. Notice how the centering pins don't pass through the Rotating Hub Assembly. I was a little concerned when I came across this. However, rotate the holes one more to the left or right, and the Assembly falls right into place. Rotating Hub Assembly in place. Here the Pressure Plate and Ball Bearings are being installed. You may be wondering if I put any oil on the bearings before I installed the Top Plate. Actually, I installed the parts to make sure it would all go together correctly, then I took it apart, lubed it as necessary, then put it back together for the final install. Next, the top plate is being installed. Just about done. Rekluse states that if you don't use their gasket, serious damage can occur. I noticed that their gasket is quite a bit thicker than the stock gasket. Next up, I went through the break in procedure. Fortunately, it was a work day for most folks, so many people in my neighborhood were at work and didn't complain about me racing up and down the street. Because I installed new Friction Plates, Rekluse recommends that you check the gap between the top Friction Plate and Drive Plate. When I put it all together the 1st time, it was dead on. After the break in, the gap spread to the maximum allowed. So, I used another one of the Rekluse Drive Plates in place of one of my stock drive plates. Yes, you need to get back into the case, replace the Drive Plate, remeasure the gap, use Loctite again and put it all back again. But in light of the cost of this unit, and the simple 10 minutes it takes, its well worth it to ensure you have the right gap. I rode the bike the very next day on some tight trails for a straight 4.5 hours. The clutch performed flawlessly. I never had an issue with the bike stalling. In fact, I noticed that when I started the bike in neutral, and then put it in 1st gear, the bike didn't move as much as it did when I had a standard cable clutch. Well worth the money, and when properly setup, performs awesomely. As noted above, I'm no stranger to sockets and working on vehicles. I've redone my own suspension on the rear of my 4Runner. I designed and built my 3-link setup on my 4Runner, and created a vehicle that can rock crawl the extreme trails, and yet cruise on the highway at 80mph in comfort. I am very cautious when doing something for the first time, so it aways takes a bit more time. For somebody who has never done this before, give yourself about 4 hours. I had to crack the case twice to add a thicker drive plate to bring the gap tolerances back into spec. But, its better to do it right the first time and not have problems down the trail.
  24. Since there is soo much talk about jetting DRZ400's with air box mods and exhaust mods I thought I would post my recent results. The mods to my new 2006 400SM went for the most part well.. Learned alot of lessons with my DRZ-400S .The mod part list is: Yoshimura 2165500-SA, DynoJet 3110.001, K&N SU-4000, assorted 4mm Allen head machine screws, and a MotoBits footpeg eliminator stolen from S model. Ebay has MotoBits kits avalible. 1. First I removed all the plastics, seat and tank; I also temporarily removed a couple of the factor zip ties to make room to work. 2. Remove TPS from carburetor, gas line; removed vacuum line from gas petcock, removed vacuum line from gas shut-off valve. 3. Removed throttle cables from carb. 4. Removed gas tank. 5. Loosened right heel guard and dismounted rear break reservoir from frame. 6. Removed bolts at lower frame holding rear fender assembly. 7. Loosened the clamp of the manifold side of the carburetor and the clamp at the rear which connects to the air-box. 8. Raise rear fender – I used an old cardboard box to hold it up in place. 9. Rotated carb and wrestled that booger and out! 10. Installed DynoJet stage two jet kit – 155 main, DynoJet needle (2nd clip from top) and slide spring – when I removed the bowl – I used a needle nose vice grips to break the screw loose – then threw the screws away and replaced them with 4mm Allen socket machine screws of the same length. 11. Drilled out idle mixture screw plug – set idle to 3 ½ turn out from bottom. 12. Re-installed carb - (Note: I also replaced the screws for the TPS with 4mm Allen head machine screws, washers and lock washers.) 13. Removed factory header, exhaust can and passenger foot pegs. 14. Installed new Yosh header pipe – left loose. 15. Separated and installed Yosh mid pipe. 16. Installed exhaust can; tossed the steel spacer and installed the new exhaust mount to the hole rear of the factory mount – I think the Yosh directions may be wrong. 17. Reattached the rear break reservoir and installed and tightened up all remaining frame and mount points, then tightened the header pipe at the engine exhaust, and reinstalled the factory heat shield to the mid pipe. 18. Cut a 3 inch square template from cardboard and drew lines on top of the air box with a grease pencil. 19. I then used a sheetrock knife heated up with a propane torch to cut the 3x3 hole in the top of the air box. 20. Removed stock air cleaner element and installed K&N filter. 21. Reinstalled tank, plactics and seat, cleaned exhaust system with Windex. 1st Test Run 22. Bike was difficult to start –needed full choke (man I should have learned from experience with the DRX 400S!) I finally got it start- but it ran like crap. 23. Run the bike up the street and promptly run out of gas. 24. Roll bike back to garage and do a visual inspection. 25. Put the vacuum line on the gas petcock 2nd Test run 26. Bike starts easily, idles wells and runs great… 27. Removed rubber inserts in footpeg, passenger strap in seat, front reflectors, trimmed rear fender and applied appropriate decals. Performed 1st Oil and Filter change (it had a 100 miles onthe bike.) If I left out some steps I apologize – but I think you can get the gist of things…
  25. 1 review

    The FX 350 shares much of its engine and chassis architecture with the motocross FC 350, but is tailored for closed course off-road usage. With a maximum output of 58 hp, the FX 350 has a 450 rivalling power-to-weight ratio while retaining the light, agile handling of 250-class machines. This is matched with an advanced electronics package featuring launch control, switchable engine maps and traction control resulting in a versatile, high performance package. Include a larger 6-speed transmission, large fuel capacity and an 18-inch rear wheel and the FX 350 is one of the most advanced off-road machines created by Husqvarna Motorcycles. Engine The 350 cc DOHC engine weighs in at only 60 pounds and has a maximum power output of 58 hp. The engine is specifically designed with performance, weight and mass centralization as key criteria. As a result, all shaft arrangements are positioned to allow oscillating masses to occupy the ideal center of gravity while all parts are engineered to offer the best possible performance while adding the least possible weight. Cylinder head The FX 350 features the same DOHC design as the FC 350 with polished camshafts and DLC coated finger followers reducing friction and improving overall performance. Added to the design are larger titanium valves (36.3 mm intake and 29.1 mm exhaust) which allow the engine to rev freely to the 13,400 rpm ceiling. Crankcase The FX 350 features an engine design with mass-centralization and weight reduction as the main goals. All the major components are positioned to achieve the best possible center of gravity. As a result, the motorcycle benefits from superb handling while ensuring a light and compact engine design. Crankshaft A superior quality crankshaft is at the heart of the high output, high-revving FX 350 engine. The plain big end bearing featuring two force-fitted bearing shells ensure maximum reliability and durability, guaranteeing long service intervals of 100 hours. TECHNICAL SPECS ENGINE Design 1-cylinder, 4-stroke engine Displacement 349.7 cm³ Bore 88 mm Stroke 57.5 mm Starter Electric starter Transmission 6-speed Primary drive 24:73 Secondary gear ratio 14:50 Clutch Wet, multi-disc clutch, Magura hydraulics EMS Keihin EMS CHASSIS Frame design 25CrMo4 steel central-tube frame Front suspension WP-USD, AER 48, Ø 48 mm Rear suspension WP shock absorber with linkage Suspension travel (front) 310 mm Suspension travel (rear) 300 mm Front brake Brembo twin-piston floating calliper, brake disc Rear brake Brembo single-piston floating calliper, brake disc Front brake disc diameter 260 mm Rear brake disc diameter 220 mm Chain 5/8 x 1/4" Steering head angle 63.9 ° Wheelbase 1485 ± 10 mm Ground clearance 370 mm Seat height 960 mm Tank capacity (approx.) 8.5 l Weight without fuel 100.6 kg
×
×
  • Create New...