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Found 186 results

  1. How to properly measure a cylinder for a top end rebuild. This applies to 2 and 4 stroke motorcycles. With just a few simple specialty tools you can measure your cylinder and small end rod to evaluate if your parts are usable or need a trip to the machine shop. This video will give an overview of the tools required and how to do the job. First and foremost a service manual for the bike/engine is required before attempting. This is just one of many measurements that must be done before ordering parts for a top end rebuild.
  2. 3 reviews

    GENERAL INFORMATION We are proud to distribute the German made Wossner line of pistons. Wossner quality is well known around the world. All Wossner pistons feature forged construction with fully coated teflon skirts and optimized design for light weight and strength. If the piston you need is not listed please contact us as we distribute the entire Wossner product line.
  3. 2 reviews

    XC Rings - Replacement Rings Sold per cylinder Wiseco rings fit Wiseco pistons only For +.010 oversized pistons
  4. 10 reviews

    All pistons are heat treated with a T-5 hardening and tempering cycle All piston skirts are coated with a high-tech Molybdenum Disulphite coating for faster break-in time and increased piston life Cast piston kits are gravity cast aluminum alloy (not forged) with 18% silicone content, which produces an extremely light but very strong piston Forged pistons are forged from 2618 aluminum for superior strength and durability Forged High Compression pistons improve power and torque across entire rpm range Big Bore pistons increase engines displacement, torque, and peak horsepower Forged Replica pistons are forged OE replacements Replica pistons and all rings are OEM replacements Kits include piston, rings, wrist pin and circlips Replacement two-stroke piston rings sold individually; four-stroke piston rings sold as a set
  5. Ben99

    Kawasaki KX125 (1986)

    0 comments

    Awesome bike! Rips up the dirt
  6. Freshening up the top end in your dirt bike or ATV is a critical part of preventative maintenance. However, it’s not as simple as purchasing a new piston kit and dropping it in. Properly preparing your cylinder is equally as important as installing a quality piston. Cylinder prep recommendations are always included with the piston when ordering from Wiseco. Depending on your application, it will either say “deglaze / hone” or “bore & hone” or “bore / replate.” We’ll take a look at exactly what these different terms mean and how to perform these steps. Deglaze your Cylinder A common question is “Do I need to deglaze my cylinder?” The answer is: yes, unless it’s time for a replate or resleeve. If you’re engine has any time on it, the glazing process has begun. The term ‘glazed’ in this context refers to the motion of the piston ring(s) flattening out and polishing the surface of the cylinder wall during normal operation. The more time on the engine, the more glazed the cylinder is going to be. However, depending on how much time is on your engine and what type of cylinder you have, you may need to replate or resleeve, which we’ll discuss next. Notice the shiny surface of the cylinder wall. This cylinder has become glazed over time. Plated vs. Sleeved Cylinders If your Powersports engine was made in the last 2 decades or so, chances are it is plated with a Nikasil (Nickel Silicone Carbide), chrome, or electrofusion plating. Nikasil has been the latest and most commonly used cylinder coating due to its wear resistance qualities, but they do still wear out. We recommend checking your manual for normal top end rebuild times, but generally if your engine has long hours, the overall condition of your cylinder will need to be closely reviewed. This will include not only the bore size and plating condition, but also the cylinder roundness and taper in reference to OEM service specifications. There are a number of good companies that offer replating services, just do your research and choose a trusted company. Your cylinder should come back with fresh plating, honed, and ready to go after a quick cleaning. This cylinder has been replated and prepped for the rebuild. The cylinder wall surface is no longer reflective and glazed-looking. Other forms of cylinders that aren’t plated commonly have iron or steel/alloy sleeves. If your cylinder does have a sleeve, you should be able to see the seam between the sleeve and the actual cylinder. If you’re still not sure, check to see if a magnet sticks to the cylinder wall. If it sticks, it’s a sleeve, and if it doesn’t, it’s plated. Much like replating a cylinder after normal top end rebuild time, your sleeved cylinder should have a new sleeve installed. The same cylinder shops that do replating should do resleeving as well, and it will come back honed and ready to go back together. In short, if your engine has enough time on it to need a full top end rebuild, we recommend replating or resleeving your cylinder. Technically you can have your previously plated cylinder sleeved, but we recommend sticking with how it came from the OEM. If it is just freshening up with low hours on the engine, you should be able to just deglaze / hone. What is Honing and Why do I Need It? When your engine was made brand new in the factory, the cylinder was honed. Honing is a process of conditioning the surface of the cylinder wall to help with lubrication of the piston ring(s) during operation. Honing creates fine cross hatch imperfections on the surface of the cylinder bore. You can think of these imperfections as peaks and valleys in the surface of the metal. These are essential because it helps the cylinder wall retain oil to assist with piston ring lubrication. Theoretically, the idea is for there to be a very thin layer of oil between the edge of the piston rings and cylinder wall. If there was no oil to lubricate the constant contact with the cylinder wall, there would be too much friction and both the rings and cylinder would wear out quickly. The term ‘deglazing’ simply refers to re-honing your cylinder to put those peaks and valleys back in your cylinder wall. This crosshatch pattern on the wall of the cylinder is the goal of the honing. How to Hone your Cylinder The most common tools you’ll find for honing small engine applications are rigid or brush hones and ball hones. Hones can be ordered by size according to your cylinder bore, just cross reference your bore size with the information from the company you order your hone from. The hone company should also have recommendations on grit and material type based on what type of rings you have. After disassembling your top end, inspect your cylinder wall and ports for damage. If you had a piston seizure or something break, chances are the cylinder was damaged. Depending on how extensive the damage is, sometimes cylinder shops can repair them. If you see any questionable damage or deep scuffs, we recommend sending your cylinder to a trusted shop for their best recommendation. If your cylinder is in normal condition with no damage, and you’re just changing rings between top ends, honing should be the only thing required. If the glazing is minimal and you can still see a fair amount of cross hatch marks, you should be able to get away with using a rigid or brush hone to just restore those cross hatch marks. You should only have to hone for about 10 – 15 seconds at a time until you can see consistent cross hatch marks. A soft hone brush like this is one of the tools that may be used to prepare the interior surface of the cylinder. The ball hone will be a little bit more abrasive, which is why we don’t recommend using a ball hone on plated cylinders unless they are specified to be safe. If you do need to use a ball hone for heavier glazing on your sleeved cylinder, attach it to your drill and lubricate it with a light coat of motor oil. Make sure the cylinder is secured and stationary, and the ball hone is spinning before entering the cylinder. Hone the cylinder back and forth for about 10 – 15 seconds, then switch to the opposite spinning direction and repeat. Check the cylinder for the desired cross hatch marks, and repeat if necessary. After honing is complete, be sure to clean the cylinder thoroughly until there is no residual material. When reassembling your top end, always be sure to double check your piston to wall clearance. Do I Need to Bore my Cylinder? If the instructions for your new piston say “bore & hone” or “bore / replate,” it’s because you ordered a piston that is larger than the stock bore size. Instructions to bore and hone your cylinder means your cylinder did not come plated from the OEM, and only requires to be machined out to the correct size for your piston. However, if it is a sleeved cylinder, consider having it resleeved depending on the time on the engine. Instructions to bore and replate your cylinder means your cylinder came plated from the OEM, so the only work required is to have the cylinder machined to the correct size for your piston, and then replated / honed. We recommend having your local trusted cylinder shop do your boring and replating work. In any case, we recommend having the cylinder bored by a professional machinist with the proper equipment. Cylinder shops that replate and resleeve usually have the capability to bore as well. Don’t Forget to Chamfer and Clean Up After any boring or honing work on a cylinder, it’s important to chamfer all ports and the bottom of the cylinder. Chamfering is smoothing out any sharp edge to leave a symmetrical sloping edge. Creating sloped edges on the bottom of the cylinder allows for easier piston and ring installation. You also want to make sure that the edges of the ports in the cylinder have a nice slope as well so the piston rings don’t get caught on any edges during engine operation. If your cylinder has an exhaust bridge, be sure it is relieved .002” - .004” to allow for expansion. Exhaust bridge relief is important in certain 2-stroke applications. Read more about exhaust bridge relief here. Lastly, be sure to properly clean any parts that have been worked on. Cylinders that have been bored and/or honed will have residual honing grit. This must be removed by washing with warm soapy water until an oil dampened cloth does not show any grit after wiping the surface of the cylinder wall. Once clean, apply a thin coat of oil on the cylinder wall before proceeding with your rebuild. Always be sure to cover all your bases when freshening up the top end in your machine. Giving the required attention to all areas will help you be sure you’re getting the smoothest performance and most reliability out of your engine.
  7. 0 comments

    Plenty of power. Outdated suspension that feels uneasy and wild. Not confidence inspiring.
  8. 0 comments

    Its a great bike. But I decided to do a full restore. Ill have it finished in a couple weeks!
  9. 0 comments

    I love this bike,I purchased it in 2008,It was a basket case motor was blown.I have been building bike motors for over 27 years.So I went to work,Punched it out to 101mm used wiseco 11:1 high compression piston,Installed a Stage 2 Hot cam for a XR650,It took some time to figure out how to pull it off,I added new FMF exhaust system for XR650L.It starts on 2 or 3 kick.I had to rejet the carbs,I am running 137.5 main jet.With the power it is making I went with Barnnet Dirt digger clutch.I cant say any thing bad about.I ride it on the trails and the street.I didn't get the bike finished until this spring.So I have only put 1200 miles on it.
  10. 0 comments

    2004 Yamaha YZ 450f - New Wiseco Top End kit installed with factory comp. piston, Renthal Twinwalls, ZipTy Racing Racing Coolant, R&D Powerbowl 1, Carb O-Ring Mod, PG Racing Graphics Wanted to add 2006-2009 Yamaha YZ 450f SSS Front fork tubes and matching rear suspension
  11. 0 comments

    Love it, it gave me some problems before the rebuild but now it's better than ever. Big bore gives it crazy bottom end and the cam makes up for that loss off the top. Awesome bike all around.
  12. 0 comments

    Its a 10 year old motocross bike, with very low hours. Perfect for an Enduro conversion. This bike astounds me. One day I'm riding MX on a track, the next I'm riding in the desert on single track. Its unstoppable, and just so easy and forgiving. I love this bike.
  13. 0 comments

    I love it,I'm try in to build it as far as I can in performance, I'm using Kimble white valve guides and valves I have an aftermarket Norris 340 cam,cobra header n pipe, I'm trying to find the rare 2 plug TC head for 200x , I want to use vintage 80s performance parts , good used,NOS,and I'm gonna combined new ignition tech........I'll add more with process I just strip her back down to paint I'm gonna take pics from how it sits to a finished minster, YES Nitrous is on the list or a turbo charger........I'll update with painting frame etc etc
  14. 0 comments

    Still one of my favorites, hence why I still have it.
  15. 0 comments

    Entirely too fun. This is the only mx bike I have owned and it has way more power than I will ever need. It's very stable at high speed, can be lugged without fear of stalling, and punches in every rpm range. Cons? It overheats pretty quickly in off-road settings, has a hard time leaning in turns, and can be difficult to handle. Still, I give it a 5 outta 5.
  16. 0 comments

    I love it. I can beat 250f's all day with it. These bikes are awesome stock but when you mod them they are even more fun!don't listen to anyone who says a 125 can't beat a 250f. They can! I raced open C on my 125 against 14 250fs and i got 5th over all these 125s haul ass!
  17. First time post but I read ThumperTalk a lot. Just got this 2002 YZ125 after not riding for 10 yrs. I'm 28 now. Drove 2 hrs to get the bike, the guy asks me to text him 30 mins before I get there. When I do he mentions the bike wont start but he rode it yesterday. Apologizes. I get there and talked him down to $1100 since I can't hear it run and drove all that way. Get it home and put in new piston and rings and replace crank seals since there was oil in the cylinder. Also replaced the silencer packing as it was drenched in oil. Let it warm and cool three times. Not even 10 mins on the first real ride the ring gets stuck on the exhaust side. Check the jetting to see if it was too lean and realize it's a 1998 carb in a 2002 bike. The previous owner put 2002 jets in it. Put the correct jets for a 98 in it with a new piston and ring and the ring gets stuck again. Then I notice the bridge where the power valve is has no plating on it. Explains the piston problem. Had a 2001 cylinder from back when I used to race. Got a new piston and ring and put it on but realized they changed the power valve design. The old design fit in the new cylinder so I put them in. Made sure the timing was 20 thousandths below top dead center. Ran it and blew a hole in the piston within 5 minutes. Figured the old style valves weren't sealing right so I ordered some 2003 valves off eBay. Put them on and did a leak down test. The valves leaked so I plugged the hose and with 7 psi found a leak at the crank seal on the timing side. After running the numbers I figured out the case is a 1998 model, carburator is a 1998 model, frame and suspension is 2002, cylinder is now a 2001 model with 2003 power valves. The previous owner had a 2002 crank in it because the 1998 seals I ordered wouldn't fit and the 2002 seals I ordered when I first got the bike did. Then I notice after splitting the case to clean the parts of the piston out they must have grinded on the crankshaft where the seals go. Could a small leak where they made the shaft not a perfect circle cause this type of damage that quick? This is my last theory. I've only had the bike 1 1/2 months and spent over $1500 on parts after buying the bike for $1100. Any help is appreciated, I just want to ride.
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