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Found 18 results

  1. Is your clutch having problems engaging and disengaging? Do you feel inconsistency through the clutch lever when operating the clutch? A worn clutch basket could be the cause. In this article, we’ll look at diagnosing a worn clutch basket, review replacement options, and step through the process of replacing the clutch basket so that the next time you need to tackle the job, you’re well prepared. Time to replace your clutch basket? Read on for a step-by-step on getting your clutch working smoothly again! Diagnosing the Issue Any clutch issues that a machine may have are typically very apparent to the rider because there is a complementary feeling of loss of control of the machine. The machine won’t become outright unrideable; however, subtleties that quickly become annoying will arise when utilizing the clutch. Most notably, modulation of the clutch may become more difficult, and the clutch feel will be inconsistent. Before taking the machine apart, verifying possible simple issues such as clutch cable adjustment and that the engine or gearbox oil has been maintained regularly should be confirmed. To inspect and disassemble the clutch, the procedures outlined in the machine’s factory service manual should be followed. Once the clutch has been removed from the engine, inspecting its condition is straightforward. Double check that any issues you may be experiencing are in fact caused by a worn basket and not from a different culprit, like a clutch cable. Click here for tips on replacing a clutch cable. The basket consists of a series of “fingers,” or “tangs” which mate with the friction discs. The basket fingers drive the friction discs. The friction discs slide out when the clutch is engaged and back in when the clutch is disengaged. Due to this interaction, notching can occur on the edges of the basket fingers. Any notching that can be felt with a pick or a fingernail can be potentially problematic. In terms of clutch basket wear, the main grounds for replacement of the basket are worn and grooved basket fingers. Notching on basket tangs is typically part of normal wear and is the main reason to warrant basket replacement. Replacement Options The clutch basket is a great component to upgrade since it has surfaces such as the basket fingers that are inherently wear surfaces. Selecting a ProX basket, which is significantly stronger and more wear resistant than OE baskets, has a high return on investment in terms of reduced maintenance and improved performance. ProX clutch baskets are precision machined from forged 7075-T6 aluminum, which is one of the strongest alloys on the market. Wear resistance is ensured by utilizing a sophisticated hard anodizing process. A final layer of performance is added in the form of a Teflon coating which seals the basket surfaces and allows the friction discs to slide effortlessly over the clutch basket fingers while in operation. ProX clutch baskets are forged from aluminum, precision machined, and hard anodized and Teflon coated for smooth clutch actuation. The tensile strength of the material combined with the coatings make notching the basket tangs almost impossible. Find ProX clutch components for your bike or ATV here! Tools Required The clutch basket is an assembly of parts including the basket, starter gear, clutch driven gear, dampers, and backing plate. The starter gear is pressed into the clutch basket, and the driven gear, dampers, and backing plate are riveted or screwed in place. When it comes to tools, you’ll need the following, outside of your standard tools used to remove the clutch from the machine: Hydraulic press or vice - capable of exerting up to 8 tons of force. Center punch, drill and drill bits, or grinder, or mill - for removing the rivets Punch and hammer - for driving the rivets out of the assembly Torque wrench and Loctite - for securing the screws in the new basket Fixturing - for adequately supporting the basket while removing and installing the starter gear. The fixturing doesn’t have to be anything fancy, and examples are provided later in this article. There a number of tools required to do the job correctly. For example, having the ability to properly press the starter gear out and in is key to retaining proper function. The Process We’re going to jump into the process post clutch removal and focus on servicing the basket. ProX clutch baskets include new dampers and screws along with instructions for your specific application. The following instructions should be considered supplementary. Mark the backing plate and gear - Use a marker to mark the outside surfaces of the backing plate and gear. Doing so will ensure that these parts are installed in the correct direction when reassembled. Removing the rivets - It is preferable to drill the rivet heads off, however, grinding and milling the heads off are also acceptable options. When drilling, it is best to start by using a center punch to indent the center of the rivet so that the drill bit will not walk. Once center punched, start with a small drill bit and work up to a bit that is slightly smaller in diameter than the rivet itself. Only drill down far enough to remove the head from the rivet. Typically, a depth of 0.040 - 0.080” (1-2mm) below the surface is all that is required to drill out the rivet head. After the rivet head has been drilled out, use a punch and hammer to drive the rivet out of the assembly. The most recommended method to remove the rivets is to drill the heads off then use a punch to remove the rest of the rivet completely. Remove the driven gear - Pull the backplate off before removing the driven gear. Note the orientation of the dampers. Take the driven gear off, then remove the dampers. Make sure you note the orientation of the dampers before removing them all after removing the driven gear. Remove the starter gear - The starter gear utilizes an interference fit with the clutch basket, so it will have to be pressed out. The exact geometry of the starter gear will be model specific. Some starter gears will feature teeth that bite into the clutch basket. Depending on the starter gear geometry and geometry of the clutch basket, it is possible the clutch basket will be destroyed during the removal process. Starter gears will differ depending on the model. Make sure it's adequately supported to press out without damaging the gear. Adequately support the clutch basket around its base so that loads applied will transfer through the center of the basket. Standoffs may need to be utilized to support the basket properly. Select an appropriately sized spacer to place between the starter gear and press. Appropriately sized sockets can serve as suitable spacers. Carefully press the gear out of the hub. There's a good chance the old basket may break when pressing the starter gear out. This is fine, the focus is on not damaging the gear itself. Clean the parts - Remove any clinging material from the starter gear, clean the driven gear and backplate. Install the starter gear - Apply engine oil to the outside of the starter gear. Carefully position it in the center of the new clutch basket. Before pressing it in, be sure to confirm any specific press-in depth requirements outlined in the instructions. Ensure the clutch basket is adequately supported before pressing the gear in place. The press force required to install the gear will be model specific and highlighted in the installation instructions. Be sure to oil the starter gear and note any depth and force specifications for your specific application. On some models, a simple shrink fit is utilized to install the starter gear. When this process is specified, follow the heating instructions for the clutch basket. Once up to temperature, carefully drop in the starter gear. Install the driven gear and dampers - Place the driven gear on the clutch basket noting any orientation requirements previously identified. Install the new dampers in the correct orientation. Install your new dampers in the correct orientation and reinstall the primary gear. Install the backplate - Double check the orientation of the dampers and driven gear. Install the backplate onto the clutch basket, noting any orientation requirements. Torque the backplate screws - Consult the installation instructions for the proper torque specs, apply Loctite if the screws are not pre-Loctite, then tighten in a cross-pattern. Reinstall your back plate with new screws and thread locking compound and torque them to spec. At this point, the clutch basket is ready for service and can be reinstalled on the engine. Refer to your service manual for assembly instructions and specifications to reinstall your clutch and button up the engine. The process of replacing a clutch basket is straightforward and can be executed by anyone so long as the necessary steps are followed and tools are available. We hope this write-up simplifies the job and helps our fellow riders and racers get back out there performing better than before!
  2. itsruk

    Kawasaki KX60 (1994)

    0 comments

    1994 Kawasaki KX60
  3. 2 reviews

    Forged from high-silicon alloy for maximum strength and dependability Wiseco offers a complete range of popular piston models and years for both trail and racing applications All Wiseco pistons are priced with rings and circlips
  4. Rebuilding a top end is a task most two-stroke owners will run into at one point or another. Here, we go over critical steps and key tips to installing a new piston and ring(s) in your two-stroke. Periodically, if you own a two-stroke, there will come a point where you need to rebuild the top end of your engine. Hopefully, this won’t come as a surprise to you and will be part of your planned maintenance schedule versus experiencing an unplanned engine failure. While two-stroke engines are relatively simple mechanical devices, rebuilding them requires knowledge of how they work, attention to detail, and a systematic approach. We’re going to cover numerous tips pertinent to two-stroke top end rebuilds. These tips will be discussed chronologically and will encompass all phases of the build from pre-rebuild prep, to disassembly, through post build. The tips we’re going to share shouldn’t be considered inclusive of everything that has to be done, but are tips that focus on things that are either often overlooked or incredibly important. Let’s get started! Pre-Teardown Diagnosis - Before tearing the engine apart, are there any signs that a specific problem exists? If so, are there any diagnostic tests such as compression or crankcase leak down that are worth performing? Before tearing your engine down, asses the specific problem with you're engine if you're rebuilding due to a running problem. Clean Machine - Take time to thoroughly clean the machine before opening up the engine, especially if you will be servicing the top end without removing the engine from the machine. Service Manual - Performing engine maintenance without an OEM factory service manual is not recommended. Make sure you have a manual for your machine prior to starting work. The manual is the only place you’ll find service limits, torque specs, and other key data. Disassembly Limit Contaminants - Once the cylinder has been removed wrap a clean, lint-free rag around the top of the crankcase. Dirt is one of the leading causes of engine wear, and limiting the opportunity for dirt to enter the crankcase is very important. Keep a lint-free rag at the top of the crankcase at all times while it is open and exposed to potential contaminants. Piston Removal - Easy piston circlip removal can be accomplished by using a pick and needle nose pliers. Insert the pick into the dimple in the piston and behind the circlip. Then use it as a lever and pry the circlip out partially. Once out partially, grab the circlip with needle nose pliers. During this process, be careful not to scratch or mar the wrist pin bore as this will make removing the wrist pin much more difficult. Use tools as needed to aid in circlip removal, but be careful not to mar the pin bore so the wrist pin can be easily removed. The ease of pin removal will be largely dependent on the engine design and condition of the bore. If the pin can be removed by hand, great, if not, light tapping while supporting the rod is permissible. Otherwise, a pin puller should be utilized which can be bought or made. In its simplest form, this can consist of an appropriately sized bolt, nut, and socket. Once the wrist pin has been removed, the piston can be removed from the rod. Hopefully, the wrist pin can be removed by hand once the circlip is out. If not, an appropriately sized socket with some light tapping from the opposite end can help break it loose. Power Valve Disassembly - Prior to taking the power valve system apart, spend some time reviewing the procedure in your service manual. For additional insight into how the components interact, review the exploded views in the service manual and look at part microfiches, which can be found online. Online microfiches can be very helpful to double-check reassembly of the power valve. They can be found on many motorcycle dealer websites. When removing the power valve system, consider laying the components out on a clean rag in an orientation that correlates to how they are installed in the engine. This is a relatively simple thing to do that will help you remember how they are installed later. When it comes to cleaning the components, clean them one at a time or in small batches so that they don’t get mixed up. Lay out all the parts of your power valve assembly as you disassemble it. This will help you keep everything organized, and make sure you get it back together correctly. Inspection Reed Valve - Don’t forget to check the condition of the reed valve petals, cage, and any stopper plates. Most service manuals will detail the acceptable clearance between the petal tips and cage as well as the stopper plate height. Ensure any rubber coatings on the reed cage are in good condition. Inspect all reed valves components thoroughly before reassembling the top end. Any parts showing signs of excessive wear or damage should be replaced. Intake Manifold - Check the intake manifold for cracks. Cracks are more common on older engines, and propagation all the way through the manifold can lead to air leaks. Exhaust Flange - Check the condition of the exhaust flange and ensure that it is not excessively worn. An excessively worn flange will make exhaust gas sealing difficult, hamper performance, and leak the infamous spooge. Power Valve Components - Take a moment to review the condition of all the power valve components. Significant wear can occur over time and lead to performance losses. Rod Small End - Check the small end rod bore for surface defects such as pitting, scratches, and marring. Any severe defects in the bore will necessitate rod replacement. The rod small end is a critical point of inspection. Any damage to the inside surface could affect the small end bearing, leading to a chain of top end problems and potential failure. Sourcing New Components When freshening up the top end in your two-stroke, it’s important to reassemble with quality components. A deglazed and honed or bored and replated cylinder is a critical component to ensuring reliable performance from your new top end. Your local cylinder shop should be able to handle the bore and replate when necessary, and a simple deglazing can be accomplished with a Scotch-Brite pad. Be sure to retain the 45-degree honing mark angle. There are a lot of choices for new pistons from the aftermarket out there, but many people choose to stick to OEM. However, when ordering from the OEM, every individual part must be ordered separately, including the piston, ring, pin, clips, gaskets, etc. Dealing with all these part numbers and chancing forgetting a component can be a pain, and get expensive. ProX two-stroke pistons are manufactured by OEM suppliers, and come with the piston, pin, ring(s), and circlips all under one part number. ProX two-stroke pistons are manufactured by the same OEM-suppliers to exact OE specs. They are available in A, B, C, and D sizing for most applications. ProX pistons come with the piston, ring(s), pin, and clips all in one box. Complete top-end gasket kits can even be ordered under one part number. ProX pistons provide an OEM-replacement option with less hassle and less strain on your wallet. Find ProX pistons for your bike here. Even though ProX pistons are made by OE suppliers, the quality control difference is evident. On the left is a ProX piston for a Honda CR250, and on the right is a brand new piston out of the box from Honda. Which would you choose? Measurements The number of measurements that should be taken throughout the top end rebuild will be discretionary. At ProX, we strive for excellence and err on the side of caution when it comes to engine building, so our builds consist of numerous measurements and inspections prior to reassembly. For us, this ensures a high level of confidence and safeguards against external oversights. We recommend the same to anyone building an engine. Below is a list of measurements that we routinely make when rebuilding a two-stroke top end: Piston ring end gaps Piston-to-cylinder clearance Rod small end diameter Out of these measurements, confirming or adjusting the ring end gaps is by far the most important, followed closely by ensuring the cylinder bore is within spec with respect to diameter, straightness, and roundness. Understandably, some measurements may be difficult for the average home builder to execute, usually due to not having the right equipment, however, a competent shop should be able to assist. Ring end gaps can be checked by installing the ring in the bore without the piston, and using a feeler gauge to find the measurement. Correct ring end gap is listed in the installation instructions that come with a new ProX piston. ProX rings often do not need to be filed as they are pre-gapped, but it's always a good idea to make sure your end gap is within the provided spec. Piston-to-cylinder is another measurement that should be checked before final assembly. For this, use a bore guage and a set of calipers to measure the bore size. Next, grab a set of micrometers and measure the piston. ProX pistons should be measured perpendicular to the wrist pin, a quarter of the way up the piston skirt from the bottom. Subtract your piston size measurement from your bore size, and you have your piston-to-cylinder clearance. ProX pistons come with a chart on the instruction sheet that shows the range your clearance should be in. Measuring piston-to-cylinder clearance is a smart precaution to help ensure you won't run into any unexpected issues with your new top end. A final measurement we recommend taking is the rod small end diameter. This is important because sometimes these can get worn out and create free play for the small end bearing, resulting in damage to the bearing and most likely the entire top end. It can be done using the same method as the bore diameter. Compare your measurement to the acceptable range in your owner's manual. Making sure the diameter of the small end of the rod is within spec is often overlooked, but can prevent a serious top end failure. Prep Work Cylinder Cleaning - Once the cylinder has been deglazed or has come back from replating, it should be cleaned one final time. There is almost always leftover honing grit that will need to be removed. To effectively clean the cylinder, use warm soapy water and a bristle brush, followed by automatic transmission fluid or a similar cleaning solution and a brush or lint-free rag. To check the cleanliness of the cylinder, rub a cotton swab around the bore and look for contaminants. Clean the bore until no contaminants are visible on the cotton swab. Any honing grit that remains in the cylinder will facilitate premature wear of the piston rings. A clean, de-glazed, and properly honed cylinder is key to piston and ring function and longevity. Power Valve Function - Cylinders that have been exchanged or replated should have the power valve system reinstalled ahead of final installation. Often times, excess plating can inhibit power valve movement. To correct this, the excess plating must be carefully removed. On cylinders utilizing blade style power valves, the blade position with respect to the cylinder bore should be checked to ensure the blade does not protrude into the bore. Assemble the power valve before installing the new piston and reinstalling the cylinder. Be sure to check that the power valve is moving as it should, and not protruding into the bore. Piston - It is usually easiest to prepare the new piston as much as possible by installing one of the circlips and the ring pack ahead of joining it to the connecting rod. Unless your service manual dictates which circlip must be installed first, choose the easiest installation orientation. Typically, your dominant hand and preferred work orientation will dictate which side you choose to install the circlip on. It's easier to install one clip and the piston ring(s) before fixing the new piston to the connecting rod. Reference your service manual to determine the correct orientation of the circlip. Usually, the open end of the circlip should be oriented to the 12 or 6 o’clock position. Temporarily install the wrist pin and use it as a backstop so that the circlip is forced to move into its groove. Installing the circlip should be done by hand to limit the chance of deformation. Orient the circlip to the desired position, then push the open ends of the circlip into position first. Be careful not to scratch or mar the wrist pin bore in the process! Once installed, use a pick or screwdriver to confirm the circlip is fully seated and does not rotate. Any circlips that can be rotated must be replaced because they have been compromised and deformed during installation. Make sure to note the orientation of each clip after installation. Some manuals may recommend specific positions depending on the piston, but always be sure the gap is not lined up with or near the dimple(s). Rings - The compression ring(s) will be directional, and the top of the ring is typically denoted by markings near the end gaps. Apply a thin coat of oil to the ring, then carefully work the ring into position, making sure to line up the ring end gaps with the locating pin in each ring groove. Install the ring(s) with the marking(s) facing up, and make sure the ring end gap is lined up with the locating pin in the ring groove. Installation Piston - On the top of the piston, an arrow will be imprinted, which typically denotes the exhaust side of the piston. Consult your service manual to confirm the proper orientation of the arrow and piston. Apply a light amount of assembly lube to the small end bearing and wrist pin bore on the piston, then install the bearing. Align the piston with the small end of the rod, and slide the wrist pin into place. Once again, use the wrist pin as a backstop, then install the remaining circlip into position. Use a pick or screwdriver to confirm it is fully seated and does not rotate. Don't forget to apply some assembly lube to the ring and piston skirts before assembly! Cylinder to Piston - In most applications, a ring compressor is not required to compress the rings and install the piston into the cylinder. Lightly oil the cylinder bore with assembly lube or engine oil, then lube the piston skirt and ring faces. Prior to installing the piston and rings, confirm one final time that the piston ring ends are oriented correctly to their respective locating pins. Once the new piston is installed on the connecting rod, apply some assembly lube to the cylinder wall, and carefully slide the cylinder over the piston. Squeeze the ring with your hand as you slide the cylinder on, simultaneously making sure the ring end gap remains aligned with the locating pin. Position the piston at or near TDC then carefully lower the cylinder bore down onto the piston. Use your fingers to compress the ring(s) and ensure the cylinder bore is square to the piston. Feel how easily the cylinder slides over the piston and rings. The installation of the cylinder should be smooth and offer little resistance. If resistance is felt, stop immediately and assess the ring pack. Occasionally one of the rings may come out of position in its groove and snag the cylinder bore. This typically happens as the ring transitions out of your fingers and into the cylinder bore. Once the cylinder is safely over the ring, slide it all the way on keeping the piston at top dead center (TDC). Don't forget to torque your cylinder and head nuts to the specification listed in your manual. Post Build Torquing - Your cylinder and head nuts should always be torqued to the specifications outlined in your service manual. Double check all the nuts are set at their corresponding specs. Spark Plug - Don’t forget to install a new spark plug and if necessary gap it appropriately. Air Filter - Be sure to install a clean air filter prior to start up. Crankcase Leak Down Test - As one final precautionary measure perform a crankcase leak down test. A crankcase leak down test will help confirm all the seals, gaskets, and joints are sealing as they should. Break-In - When running your new top end for the first time, keep the engine slightly above idle, with slow and mild revs until the engine starts to get too hot to touch. Then, shut the engine off and let it cool until it is warm to the touch. Repeat this process, revving slightly higher and letting the engine get partially hotter each time. After 3 cycles like this, let the engine completely cool, then check all your fluids and re-check the torque on your cylinder and head bolts. Once that is squared away, you can begin break-in runs riding the bike. Make sure to keep the RPMs varied while riding for the first time, not letting the engine lug or sit at idle. A safe bet would be to ride the bike like this for 5 minutes, then 10 minutes, and finally 15 minutes, with adequate cooling in between. This will ensure your piston ring(s) are evenly and properly broken in. It’s never a bad idea to double check your fluids and torque one more time after complete cool down.
  5. 1 review

    An alternative where the O.E.M. application uses expensive and less durable titanium valves These steel valves offer increased durability and easily extends the lifespan to 3 times that of the O.E.M. titanium valves Nitrided valves offer high microhardness while supersmooth surface finish reduces friction between stem and guide Special stronger valve springs deal with the extra weight of the steel valves Springs are made from premium chrome vanadium steel for higher performance and durability under high RPM Fully rebuildable with O.E.M. retainers, bases and seals without the need of any further engine modifications Intake and exhaust kits complete packages for quick, easy and cost efficient replacement
  6. Periodically inspecting and replacing the chain on your motorcycle or ATV is part of regular maintenance. Here, we go over steps and key tips for replacing your worn out chain with a new one. The necessity to periodically replace the chain on off-road machines comes as a byproduct of operating in harsh environments containing dirt, mud, sand, etc. On road machines aren’t exempt from this maintenance task either, however, their replacement intervals are longer. Replacing your machine’s chain isn’t a tough job if you’re well equipped and prepared to take on the task. Replacing your machine's chain is part of normal maintenance and should not be neglected. To start, it is essential to have a copy of your machine’s factory service manual. Within the service manual, you’ll find specific instructions and torque specifications that may be required to complete the job. For example, if either of the sprockets requires replacement, it is imperative the nuts and bolts that secure them are torqued to the outlined specifications. Before purchasing a new chain, you’ll want to confirm that the sprockets are in good condition. Pairing a new chain to worn sprockets will accelerate the rate of chain wear and be counterproductive. You’ll also want to inspect components that come in contact with the chain such as chain slides and rollers. Replacing these components at the same time as the chain is advantageous. Inspect your sprockets before beginning the new chain install process. Notice how the grooves in the worn sprocket are asymmetrical in comparison to the new sprocket. Inspections Sprocket condition can be checked visually by looking at the sprocket teeth. Sprocket teeth take on a hook shape when they become worn, and in severe cases, shorten and round off when service has been severely neglected. If funds allow, it’s always best practice to replace both sprockets when replacing your chain. This will allow for the most life possible out of your drive system. Don't let a worn sprocket ruin your new chain. Replace them when you replace your chain. The condition of the chain can be assessed by putting the bike on a center stand. Rotate the rear wheel and visually inspect the chain’s condition. As you rotate, feel the chain for tight spots or links that are stuck together. Attempt to pull the chain away from the rearmost part of the rear sprocket. If the chain can be pulled off the rear sprocket by a half sprocket tooth or more, it is time for a replacement. Similarly, if the chain moves significantly side to side when pushed and pulled on the sprocket, wear has occurred. Check your chain's wear level by attempting to pull it away from the back of the rear sprocket. If it's half a tooth or more, it's time for a replacement. Check any chain slides to ensure they have ample life left. Rotate chain rollers to ensure they spin freely. Check your chain rollers and sliders as well. These are normal wear items, and they should be replaced when they show signs of excessive wear. ProX also offer OEM replacement chain rollers in addition to chains and sprockets. Chain Sizing and Options Off and on-road chains used for powersports applications come in various sizes based on chain pitch and length. Before purchasing a new chain, you’ll need to confirm the appropriate pitch and size for your machine. Chain pitch defines the distance between the chain pins. Common pitch options are shown in the table below along with their corresponding dimensions. There are a couple of ways to determine the type of chain your machine utilizes. First, your factory service manual should contain this information. This is usually found in the rear wheel specification table. Second, most chain manufacturers denote the chain’s pitch on the side of the chain. You can obtain the chain’s length simply by counting the number of chain links it has. Many chain manufacturers will indicate the pitch on the links of the chain itself. Once you’ve determined the chain pitch and length you need, you’re ready to order. When it comes to ordering, you’ll need to decide on the type of master link connection you want and whether the chain is a standard chain or a sealed chain. The most common chains in dirt bike and ATV applications are 420 (for minis) and 520. ProX offers both sizes of chains. ProX 520MX chains are available in both standard and X-ring, in standard and gold finishes. The gold finish is the result of a rust-resistant coating. ProX chains are made in Japan from high-quality Japanese steel. These chains come with master link style connections, which is the most common in modern off-road applications. 520 is the most common size for modern off-road motorcycles, and 420 is a common size for minis. Master Link Connection Clip Type - Clip type connections are widespread nowadays and are notable for their ease of installation. Clip type master links are not quite as strong as rivet type. However, they can be installed with no special tools. Rivet Type - Rivet type master links require a special rivet tool to install but offer a more permanent connection. A clip type master link. Chain Seals The difference between a standard chain and a sealed chain is that the former does not use any type of seal to retain chain lubricant. Sealed chains, often referred to as O-ring chains, utilize O-rings or similar variants to retain lubricant which helps reduce wear and prolong chain life. There are different styles of O-ring chains available, such as ProX’s X-ring chains. ProX’s X-ring chains are a sealed O-ring chain but have less O-ring surface area touching the link surfaces to reduce the drag in comparison to a normal O-ring chain. The advantage is in the design of the O-rings themselves. CLICK HERE for a full explanation of the differences between standard and O-ring chains to help you decide which one type is right for you. Tools To replace a chain that utilizes a clip type master link, you’ll need the following: Pliers for pressing on the chain plate or master link plate pressing tool. Pliers will also be used to install the master link clip. Flat blade screwdriver for removing the master link clip. Grinder, punch, and hammer, or chain breaker tool to adjust chain length. To replace a chain that utilizes a rivet type master link, you’ll need the following: Chain rivet tool for installing the master link. Grinder, punch, and hammer, or chain breaker tool to adjust chain length and to remove the old chain. Ensure you have the proper tools before beginning your chain replacement job. Chain Removal On chains utilizing a clip type master link, chain removal is as simple as prying off the master link clip and removing the master link. Through use, the master link plate usually wears enough so that it can easily be slid off the link. If the master link plate is tight, the master link should be driven out by using a punch and hammer or chain break tool. For clip style chains, one easy way to remove the master link clip is to use a pair of pliers to push the clip off by using the chain pin for leverage. Chains utilizing rivet master links will require pin grinding so that one of the links can be removed. Grind the rivets that retain one of the links flat, then use a punch and hammer or chain break tool to push the chain link out. Chain Installation If necessary, resize the chain to your machine by removing the appropriate number of chain links. Remember to count the chain links of the old chain to establish the length of the new chain. Don’t lay them side by side and try to set the length because the chain stretch that occurred in the old chain will lead to an incorrect chain length of the new chain. Chains almost always need to be sized (have links removed). Your manual should specify the required number of links, but sizing it up on the bike will give you a good idea if your rear axle will be in the recommended position. Chain links can be removed by carefully grinding the rivet flat to the chain side plate, then driving the pin out with a punch and hammer. Alternatively, a chain break tool can be used. Sizing the chain can be done by grinding and punching, but the easiest way to remove links is to use a tool made specifically for the job. Loosen the rear axle nut and slacken the chain adjusters. The new chain will necessitate this since it has not worn or stretched. Position the two chain ends on the rear sprocket. Next, install the master link whether clip or rivet type. Be sure to include the o-rings when installing sealed chains. Clip Type Master Link Install Once the master link has been installed, install another pair of o-rings (on sealed chains) followed by the master link plate. The master link plate will need to be pressed onto the master link. Use a pair of pliers to squeeze the plate onto the master link. Press the plate on far enough so that the grooves that retain the master link clip become exposed. A pair of small c-clamps can sometimes be helpful when installing the plate, or a master link plate installation tool can be utilized. Place your master link through the wheel side of the chain so the clip will face out. Next, press the master link plate on the outside of the link. Using a pair of pliers to press the plate past the grooves on the chain pins should be sufficient. Next, install the master link clip. The master link clip is directional and should be oriented so that the closed end of the clip leads the direction of rotation. By orienting the clip this way, should the clip hit an object during operation, it will not become dislodged from the master link. To install the master link clip, position it in its mating grooves on the master link. Use pliers to seat the clip fully in its grooves. Now, install the master link clip. The closed end of the clip should lead the direction of forward rotation of the wheel. Use a pair of pliers with leverage against the pin to fully snap the clip in place. Be sure it is fully seated. Rivet Type Master Link Install To install a rivet type master link, you will need a master link rivet tool. It’s recommend to follow the instructions provided with the tool to perform the rivet operation. The chain manufacturer will also provide specifications which govern the appropriate amount of flare to add when deforming the rivets. Setting Chain Slack Once the master link has been installed the chain tension should be adjusted so that the machine has the appropriate amount of chain slack. Your machine’s service manual will outline how to measure the chain slack and define the slack range. Most manufacturers recommend measuring chain slack with the bike on a center stand. Slack is then measured by pulling up on the chain near the center of the swingarm and measuring its displacement. Most dirt bikes require 30 - 60mm (1.18 - 2.36 inches) of chain slack. Carefully manipulate the chain adjusters so that they tension the chain evenly and align with the same reference points from side to side. Once chain slack is correctly set, torque the rear axle nut to the specification outlined in your service manual. Once installed, adjust your chain slack to the recommended spec using the axle block adjusters. Secure the lock nut when finished, then torque the rear axle nut to spec. Post Installation Tips Most chains are pre-stretched to reduce the amount of initial chain stretch that occurs once the chain is put in use, however, it is never a bad idea to keep an eye on the chain slack after the first few rides. New chains come pre-lubricated from the factory. However, you should always ensure your chain stays lubricated throughout its life. Lubing your chain before or after every ride, especially muddy or rainy ones, should become habitual. Find ProX chain and other components for your bike HERE!
  7. We have a used 2006 YZ450F that we're rebuilding step-by-step, and documenting along the way. In this part 1 feature, we'll go over how to replace a 4-stroke piston. Click here to watch the quick tip video to go along with it! The top end in a four-stroke can be split up into two major sections: the head, and the cylinder and piston. They both require specific attention and critical steps to ensure proper opertation once everything is back together. We replaced the worn stock piston with an OEM quality forged ProX piston kit. It includes the rings, wrist pin, circlips, and installation instructions. The pistons are available in A, B, and C sizes, to accomodate for the size of your cylinder as it wears. Our new ProX forged piston compared to the stock, used piston. Carbon deposits on the crown are common after running hours, but can decrease power and efficiency. Disassembly To prepare to disassemble your head and cylinder, you'll need to remove the seat, gas tank, exhaust system, and carburetor (or throttle body). While not always required, removing the sub-frame, shock, and air boot make accessibility to the engine a lot easier in most cases. Once those major components are removed, you'll need to remove any other components attached to the head or cylinder, such as clutch cable guides, spark plug boots, and electrical connections. Removing the subframe, airboot, and shock, in addition to the other components, provides much better access to all sides of the motor. Don't forget to remove any cable guides or other items bolted to the head/cylinder. Next, remove the cam cover, loosening the bolts incrementally until they are all loose. With that off, it is best to make sure your camshafts are not fully compressing any of the valve springs before you loosen the cam caps. You can do this by slowly rotating the crankshaft via the kickstarter. With the cam caps removed, loosen and remove the cam chain tensioner next. This will give you the slack to remove the timing chain completely. You can now lift the camshafts completely out, handling carefully. Now you can loosen the head bolts in incrementally in a crossing pattern. Remove the head and place it aside, handling it carefully. Next, do the same for the cylinder bolts, and carefully remove the cylinder. As you remove the cylinder, the piston is going to stay on the connecting rod, so it helps to hold the connecting rod steady as you wiggle the cylinder off the piston. It is always a good idea to fill the opening of the cases with a lint free rag to prevent debris or loose parts from falling in. Remove the cam cover and head bolts incrementally until loose. This prevents the chance of warping. Finally, you can remove one wire lock from the stock piston using a pick or small screwdriver. Slide the wrist pin out, and remove the piston from the small end of the connecting rod. Be very careful no to drop anything into the cases during this step, and throughout the entire process. Cleaning With everyting removed, you'll need to clean any old gasket material and other residue off your sealing surfaces. This includes the base for the cylinder on the cases, top and bottom surfaces of the cylinder itself, and the bottom surface of the head that seals to the cylinder. For large or difficult pieces of material, it is common to use a razor blade for removal. However, be gentle and careful not to put deep grooves or scratches in the surfaces. Also, don't cut your finger open, or off. Scrape old gasket material off carefully, being cautious of any grooves or scratches in sealing surfaces and personal injury. Final cleaning commonly consists of using carb cleaner, or a similar chemical cleaner, and a rag to achieve completely clean and flat surfaces. Cylinder Prep Before you go and put that cylinder back in with your new piston, you'll want to inspect it for signs of wear, and measure it to make sure it's within spec (refer to your owner's manual for proper specifications). If there is minimal glazing on the cylinder, no grooves worn in, and it's within spec, you should be ready to reinstall after a good honing. Always use a diamond tipped honing brush for resurfacing work. If you're unsure about performing any cylinder prep work yourself, talk to your local dealer about cylinder shops, where any prep work required can be performed. ProX pistons are available in multiple sizes to accomodate for cylinder wear, so be sure your bore measurements correlate with the size of piston you're installing. Make sure your cylinder is the correct bore size for your piston, and properly cleaned and honed, as pictured here. Reassembly When you have your cylinder prepped and ready, now is a good time to double check your piston-to-wall clearance and ring end gap. For piston-to-wall, measure the size of your ProX piston using a micrometer only. Measure the piston on the skirt, 90 degrees from the wrist pin bore, at the point on the skirt that is 1/4 of height of the piston from the bottom. Refer to your manual for acceptable piston-to-wall clearance range. When measuring ring end gap, install the top ring and second ring (seperately, and if applicable) approximately 1/4" into the bore. Use a feeler gauge to be sure ring end gap is within the dimensions specified in your piston kit instructions. ProX rings are pre-gapped, but it is always good practice to double check. While ProX rings are pre-gapped, it's still a good idea to double check your ring end gap. Install the rings in the proper order and location on your pistons. Refer to the instructions that come with ProX piston kits to be sure you are installing the rings in the correct fashion and location. After this, install one wire lock into your piston, being sure it is properly seated. Click here for our tips on installing wire locks. Use your finger to put a layer of motor oil on the cylinder wall. Next, put a layer of oil on the outside of your new piston (on the outside of the rings, on the ring belt, and on the skirts). You don't want your new piston and rings breaking in under dry conditions. Use the normal motor oil you use in your 4-stroke. Piston installation can be done via more than one method, but in our case, we installed the piston in the cylinder before attaching it to the connecting rod. Either way, be sure your piston is facing the correct direction, meaning the exhaust valve reliefs line up with the exhaust side of the head. There will be markings on the crown of ProX pistons to indiciate which side is the exhaust side. Also, make sure your rings remain in the proper location as you slide the piston into the cylinder. The arrow shows the marking on the piston crown that indicates that is the side of piston that needs to face the exhaust. Before installing the new base gasket, piston and re-installing the cylinder, make sure the surface is clean and the crankcase is free of debris. While the top end is off, this could also be a good time to make sure your crankshaft is in spec. Next, lay your new base gasket on the cases, lining it up properly. Install the piston (which should remain in the cylinder) onto the connecting rod by lining up the pin bore with the small end bore, and sliding your new wrist pin (put a layer of oil on this before installing) completely through, until it stops against the one wire lock previosuly installed. With the piston secured to the connecting rod via the wrist pin, install your remaining wire lock, and make sure it is properly seated. You can now slide the cylinder all the way down to meet the cases. Note: Make sure you take any rags out of the cases before reassembling! You're now at the point in reassembly where you will install your rebuilt head (details in part 2 of this top end rebuild soon to come) with the proper head gasket, and re-install all the items previously removed. Be sure you are following all proper torque specs specified in your manual. Head back for part 2 of the the top end rebuild, where we'll show you some great tips on assembling a four-stroke head with new valves and valve springs, re-installing camshaft(s) and timing chain, and checking and adjusting valve clearance. Our new ProX piston and freshened up clyinder successfully installed. Note the dot on the piston crown, indicating that is the exhaust side. Stay tuned, more rebuild tips to come!
  8. 0 comments

    most fun bike i've ever owned. handles great and hauls ass for a 125. the lil smoker is breathing down the neck of my friends 45o's every time we ride
  9. Whether you're a seasoned wrench who justs wants to compare notes or a top-end rebuild No0b, here's a great article on the subject, including pics. Give it a read, share any comments in the comment section, and share with an any 2 stroke ridin' buds that might benefit from it. https://thumpertalk.com/articles/how-to-rebuild-the-top-end-in-your-two-stroke-r878/
  10. 1 review

    Manufactured from high quality alloy with super smooth finish for high flow Adjusts flow offering significantly improved drivability and increased torque in the lower rev range Installs in the throttle body of the fuel injection system No need to adjust ECU
  11. 3 reviews

    Built from the strongest and most dependable alloys available today Come complete with crankpin, big-end bearing, small-end bearing and washers Easy to install
  12. Purchase any Wiseco Powersports product(s) with a subtotal of $250 or more between March 21st 2018 and May 31st 2018, and receive a ProX air filter FREE by mail-in rebate! Just follow the redemption process outlined below. A Race-Quality, Dual-Stage Air Filter for Free! ProX air filters feature dual-stage bonded foam, to capture dirt and debris, from coarse to fine. The thick, flat sealing ring provides a proper seat on the air box, to keep everything but air out. ProX air filters optimize air flow and protection in one package. How to Redeem Your Free ProX Air Filter: Purchase Wiseco Powersports product subtotaling $250 or more between March 21st 2018 and May 31st 2018. Download the rebate form here. Complete the form and include a copy of your receipt showing the seller's name/company and selling price(s), and the product serial number(s). Cut out the barcode label(s) on the side of the box with the Wiseco part number(s) and mail in with your redemption form. Mail completed form and copy of receipt to: Wiseco Performance Products Attn: ProX Air Filter Rebate 7201 Industrial Park Blvd. Mentor, Ohio 44060 You will receive your free air filter in 4-6 weeks. Go here for complete details and terms and conditions. ProX air filters feature dual-stage bonded foam and thick sealing rings, creating a reliable combination of protection and performance. Learn about proper air filter maintenance and performance here.
  13. Ok, so new guy here. Had a few quads in my days, rode many a dirt bike in my younger years but never owned one. Always been a car guy (I bleed Ford Blue) and thought I find a cheap bike to have some fun with. Found this 1998 Kawasaki KX 125 for cheap and thought it be perfect to spend a couple bux on and have some fun. I rode the bike before bringing it home. I needed to be push started, but it DID RUN and it has a title, so I knew there was at least SOME value in this bike. Granted, it didnt run very well and bogged down and yadda yadda yadda. Fine, ill take it. So home it went. On the way home it dawned on me that even though i can fix and rebuild most any Ford V8 on the planet, that doesn't really make me super qualified to troubleshoot this ol 2-stroke. But, im not completely incapable of figuring things out and internal combustion driven stuff is generally fun, so screw it. Somewhere in the first hour of taking the plastics off and getting into the top end (keeping in mind that a "top end rebuild" is basically foreign to me) I decided that im gonna go full on Meth Head on this bike and completely tear it down. Check the whole thing out and see if I can get myself familiar with the bike. So thats whats happening now. Easter Sunday, the CL deal is done and the bike is home. Went all out on this super custom orange bike stand and here she is in all her old and neglected glory. But on a positive note, theres a SICK lil fanny trail pack. So theres that. So I got to this point and thought to myself, hmmm...this doesn't seem right at all. Car pistons shouldnt look like this, so im guessing this piston shouldn't either. Haha Insert artsy photo here... Look Dad, its just like a real piston, only smaller After being defeated by the final bolt, the swing arm bolt, for about 24 hours, I got it out and the frame is stripped.
  14. Many riders associate the need for a bottom end rebuild with a costly trip to the shop. However, saving on labor and parts isn't out of the question with the help of ProX. We put together a list of 10 tips to help those who want to tackle the rebuild themselves. Rebuilding the bottom end of your engine, whether two or four-stroke, can be a fun and rewarding job. Additionally, a considerable amount of money can be saved by taking on the work yourself versus tasking a shop to perform the work. These statements are only true, however, assuming the bottom end rebuild is performed correctly. This is a huge caveat, and for the average weekend warrior who doesn’t perform this task often, unfamiliarity with technique and componentry can lead to errors. To help ensure your next bottom end rebuild is executed to a professional level, here’s 10 tips which will elevate your confidence and understanding as an amateur engine builder. The tips will be presented in chronological order. Let’s get started! Rebuilding the bottom end yourself can be a daunting, yet rewarding, task. Just make sure you take the engine out of the frame first! Correct Tools, Correct Diagnostics, Correct Expectations, Correct Replacement Components Successfully rebuilding your bottom end starts with planning and preparation. Starting with tools, you’ll need a few specialty tools in conjunction with your standard sockets, wrenches, etc. Namely, the correct flywheel puller for your specific engine, a flywheel holding tool, a crankcase splitting tool, a blind bearing puller, and a crankshaft puller. Using heat to assist in removal/installation of the bearings and crankshaft is an effective method, so an oven and freezer are also noteworthy items. You need to have a copy of the factory service manual or equivalent for your particular vehicle. I highly recommend reviewing the sequence of events and procedure in advance of executing the work. If you are rebuilding the bottom end because of a failure, be sure to inspect all components to identify the cause of the failure and determine what was damaged. This will ensure your rebuilt engine will not encounter the same problem. Bottom ends are taken apart for many different reasons. If a major failure occurred, the scrutiny of the rebuild will be at a much higher level than a bottom end that is merely being reconditioned. If any problems were persistent when the machine was operated, such as a poorly shifting gearbox, or leaks between the crankcases, the causation of these issues must be identified prior to reassembly. Replacement components are a major factor to consider, both in terms of cost and engine performance, when diving into a bottom end rebuild. Replacing bearings, seals, gaskets, and refurbishing the crankshaft either by rebuilding or replacing it is essential. It’s recommended to peruse your service manual or microfiches ahead of the rebuild to generate a list of replacement components. Selection of components and sourcing them should also be planned out. In addition to OEM options, brands such as ProX offer OEM quality parts at more affordable prices. Complete crankshafts, connecting rod kits, bearings, seals, and many other components can be found for a wide variety of engine models that can make the rebuilding process easy and affordable. All ProX bottom end parts are made by OE manufacturers and suppliers to OE standards, so your mind can rest easy that your rebuild can retain OEM quality and longevity. Click here to see more about ProX drop-in ready complete crankshafts. ProX bottom end components are manufactured by OE suppliers to OE specifications. Crankshafts, gaskets, seals, and bearings are available to cover your bottom end rebuild with OEM reliability and performance. Find all the OEM replacement parts you need for your bike here. Keeping Track of Hardware As the engine is torn apart, you will amass a significant number of components, bolts, nuts, and miscellaneous hardware. Properly keeping track of these items is critical. I prefer to lay sub-systems out on a large table, remove the bare minimum of components/hardware to get to the items I’m servicing, and stick bolts through cardboard in the pattern they were removed from components (think crankcases and covers). This methodology reduces the number of mixups that can occur and ensures bolts of varying length will be reinstalled in their original location. While my method is far from the only one, make sure you have a robust and sustainable system for keeping track of everything. Flywheel Removal Commonly, two specialty tools are required to remove the flywheel - a flywheel puller and a flywheel holder. It is imperative that both are utilized. Many rebuilds have gone awry because a flywheel holding tool was not used during the rebuild. Instead, the crankshaft was secured from the primary drive side when the flywheel nut was removed/installed. At face value, this may not seem like a big deal, however, when the flywheel is removed, or more importantly installed, in this fashion, a torque is exerted across the crankshaft. While it may seem implausible, the twisting force that is exerted can actually alter the trueness of the crankshaft. Using proper tools is critical. Pictured here is a clutch holder, used in aiding in clutch component removal, which also doubles as a flywheel holder. The small dowels on the back of the arms of the tool sit inside the recesses in the flywheel to hold it in place while removing the flywheel. Crankcase Separation There are a few noteworthy items to discuss when separating the crankcases. First off, I always recommend blocking the crankcases so that the split line lies horizontally, and confirming which side should be oriented face up. Doing this will reduce the likelihood of components falling out and ensure that subsequent removal of components goes smoothly. When installing the crankcase splitter, make sure a protective cap is used to cover the end of the crankshaft. This applies to both two and four-strokes, but is especially critical on four-stroke engines that pass oil out the end of the crankshaft. Be sure to position the crankcase splitter arms as close to equispaced from one another as possible. Also, ensure that the splitter studs utilize thread engagement at least 1.5 times the diameter of the bolt. For example, most crankcase bolt holes are 6mm, so the stud should be screwed down at least 9mm to ensure adequate thread engagement. Removing the crank after the cases have been split is another critical job that requiring a special tool. We always recommend using a crank puller. The puller can also be used to install the crankshaft. Once the crankcase splitter is set up, it is imperative that separation happens evenly around the periphery of the crankcases. Screwdrivers and the like should never be used to facilitate separation. Instead, a rubber mallet can be used to encourage separation. Seal and Bearing Removal The use of seal pullers to facilitate seal removal is not completely necessary, but is definitely recommended. Their use reduces the likelihood of bore damage during removal. Bearing removal can be done with or without heat. However, the former seems to be a better method. Using heat to remove the crankcase bearings reduces bearing bore wear and work on part of the rebuilder. I do want to note that your heat source and surrounding area can become odorous due to the residual oils that become heated during the process. For this reason, it is advisable to thoroughly clean the crankcases prior to heating them up, as well as keeping ventilation in mind. After heating the crankcase halves, use a hammer and punch to remove any bearings that did not come out on their own. Be careful not to damage the bearing bores when doing this. To remove the bearings by heating the crankcase halves, position the crankcase halves split line down on a pair of trays. The trays will catch the bearings and any oil that did not get cleaned out. The oven, grill, or heat source should be set at 350 degrees Farenheit, and the crankcases should be heated for around half an hour. After, the majority of the crankcase bearings should fall out of their bores. Any bearings that did not drop out should be carefully tapped out with a punch and hammer. Bearings situated in blind bearing bores that did not fall out should be removed with the assistance of a blind bearing puller. If you do not want to or can’t use the heating method to remove the bearings, an arbor or hydraulic press may be utilized to aid in removal. A blind bearing puller will also have to be heavily relied on to facilitate removal. Due to the unevenness of load distribution that can result from pounding the bearings out with a hammer, we caution against this as a primary form of removal without the aid of heat. Cleaning, Case, and Component Inspection At this point, it is my recommendation that all components that originated inside the crankcases be thoroughly cleaned. Clean components will ensure easy and accurate inspections. On four-stroke engines that have oil passages running through the crankcases, cylinder, and cylinder head, it is imperative that these are cleaned and blown out. This is especially true if the engine suffered a major failure where oil contamination was a resulting issue. Similarly, on two-strokes, the passages that lead to the crank bearings should be cleaned. Component inspections should be conducted to assess the condition of the gearbox, crankcase bearing bores, and crankshaft. The crankshaft should either be rebuilt or replaced depending on the severity of wear and desires of the builder. Should you determine you'd like to rebuild your crank, ProX offers OEM quality connecting rod kits that can be used for a crankshaft rebuild. Unless you are experienced in this field and have the tools, crankshaft rebuilds should be trusted in the hands of a reputable shop. ProX connecting rods are double-forged, Japanese steel, and are heat treated and shot peened for strength and longevity. Read about the advtantages of ProX connecting rods here. Crankshaft Trueness Regardless of whether a new or rebuilt crankshaft is utilized, the trueness of the crankshaft must be checked. This can be farmed out to a competent shop, machinist, or if properly equipped, performed in-house. While it should normally be expected that new or rebuilt cranks are within runout specifications, the trueness of the crankshaft is imperative to long-term durability. Checking is insurance that our postal system didn’t drop your crank, and that the factory or rebuilder did their job correctly. Bearing Installation Similar to removal, heat can also aid in bearing installation. The same heating recommendations apply, and once at temperature, the majority of the bearings should fall to the bottom of their bores without any input. The caveat to this is the bearing dropping into the bore cock-eyed. When this happens, a punch and hammer should be used be help square the bearing to its bore. Be sure to tap on the outer race of the bearing. To ensure the bearings are at the bottom of their bores, they should be tapped to confirm they are fully seated. Bearings should be tapped on their outer races only to make sure they are completely and squarley seated in their bores. Alternatively, if you don’t want to, or can’t use heat, an arbor or hydraulic press should be utilized to install the bearings. Be sure to load the bearings through their outer races when pressing them in place. Seal Installation Seals can be tapped into place with a seal driver or socket and hammer. Alternatively, a press can be used. The important checks to perform are to ensure the seals have been installed squarely in their respective bores, and at any prescribed depths outlined in the service manual. Any seals installed cock-eyed will wear out prematurely. When installing new seals, make sure they are completely seated by using a seal driver or socket and hammer. Use caution and make sure the tools don't come in contact with anything but the seal. To prepare for the new bearing and seal installation, complete crankshaft bearing and seal kits are available through ProX. ProX uses reputable, OEM bearing and seal suppliers for all parts in order to maintain OEM quality. Ordering in kits creates less hassle and is a budget-friendly step in your rebuild. Click here to check out ProX bearings and seals. Crankshaft Installation Crankshafts that utilize an interference fit with their mating crank bearings can be installed two ways. Shrinking the crankshaft in place using a combination of heating and cooling of components works well. Alternatively, utilizing a crankshaft puller is another great way to install the crankshaft. Pounding or pressing the crankshaft into place should never be considered because the trueness of the crankshaft can be affected. While your crankshaft cools in the freezer, carefully heat the inner race of the crank bearing, paying careful attention not to damage any new seals. To shrink the crankshaft in place the crankshaft should be set in a freezer for about an hour, and the inner race of the crank bearing should be carefully heated with a torch. The cautionary point here is to use care when heating if the crank seals have already been installed. Inner race temperature can be gauged by applying a drop of water to the surface of the race. If the water droplet sizzles, the inner race is plenty hot. At this point, the cooled crankshaft can be dropped through the heated bearing. Once seated, work to button up the crankcase assembly should progress quickly, and the remaining inner race can be heated and the crankcase installed. Using a crankshaft puller is an equally acceptable method and is incredibly straightforward. The puller is threaded and seats against the crank bearing or crankcase and attaches to the end of the crank via a nut or retaining ring. Once set up, the puller is tightened and the crankshaft is pulled through the bearing. Your cooled crankshaft should fit through your heated bearing fairly easily. A crank puller can be used for installation to make sure everything is square. Also, be sure to use assembly lube in critical areas during assembly. At this point, your crankcases should be buttoned up and you should be well on your way to rebuilding the rest of your engine. Upon installation of your flywheel, be sure to use a flywheel holding tool to secure it in place when torqueing the nut. Images provided and owned by Kelsey Jorissen Photography, LLC.
  15. 0 comments

    Still trying to figure this bike out. I raced one when I was 17, back in the day !!! Love the classic looks. <br /><br />I've raced the bike x 2 in 2015, and found a number of problems, so I've actually completely rebuilt the engine, and replaced the carb with a Mikuni. Seems to run really nicely now. Looking forward to the 2016 season !!
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