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Found 16 results

  1. Hey, internet. I am rebuilding a 2009 Yamaha yz250f. I bought it blown up from another guy. I took the motor out of the bike for ease of rebuilding. The head was destroyed so it got a brand new head, entire valvetrain, cams, piston, new spark plug, and I honed the cylinder. Once I got everything back together, I put it in the bike. I hooked up all the electronic plugs to the bike and timed the motor then. No start. I talked to a couple guys and they thought I might have been off 180 degrees on my timing, so i took the cams out, rotated the motor over once, then reinstalled the cams. Still no start. I tried the old spark plug, no start. I put the plug in the ignition coil out of the bike and it made a good spark, on both plugs. I also have a 2007 Yamaha wr250f with the same motor, tried the ignition coil off that, no start. I reshimmed the valves, I might have had a too big shim leaving the valve slightly open. No start still. I've retimed the motor about 5 times now, with no success. I also went through and cleaned the carb. As of now I don't have the air filter on it. I opened the throttle all the way and gave it some starting fluid to get at least one fire. Still nothing. I got a bit of gas and dumped it down the spark plug hole, nothing. I haven't had one single fire since rebuilding it. I'm out of ideas, any suggestions?
  2. Zach7018

    DRZ BURNING OIL!!!

    I have a 2002 drz400s that just hit 11,500 miles. I've owned it about 1000 of those miles and they were done some highway, some urban street and some trail. I had an issue a while back with the float needle seat o-ring letting fuel into the oil, changed the o-ring and that seemed to be the end of it. At first the bike wasn't running great but after fixing that carb issue, a 3x3 mod and a JD jet kit I'm in love with this machine...which is why I'm very concerned about her drinking oil!!! Ive noticed over about the last 300 miles or so it has gone from full on the dip stick to about half. This morning I took her around the block to get her all warmed up and check the oil and it was about 3/4 of the way up the stick. This afternoon I did about 40 miles highway and 20 miles trail and came back and checked and it was half. I decided to dump a little oil in there until it read full on the stick. I"m confused because the bike is running pretty well and if it was drinking that much oil and had bad rings I would think this would be noticed. There are no leaks on the floor of my garage or any signs on the engine thats its leaking, also no sign of oil in the exhaust. So ...What could it be, is it immediately serious, and can I just keep adding oil and get another 1000 miles out of it before I have to rebuild her?
  3. Well it’s been almost a year since I’ve gotten this bike, and I can say I’ve truly enjoyed the process. Thank you for the help you guys have given me and I figured I’d. Come back to share the transformation. (Black being before & Blue Being after) since these pictures I have changed the seat and seat cover, cutting it down half inch and with a FLU design seat cover Edit: yes I know this isn’t the best rebuild at all, but it’s the best I could do for the budget. Also if anyone could list some pretty good cheap modifications or parts that’d be gladly appreciated
  4. thewizardozz

    1999 KX125 Rebuild

    I bought this bike around a month ago and am just getting around to posting it. This will hopefully be a full rebuild thread. Keep in mind that I am a broke 15 year old and will update as I have time. The bike is a 1999 KX125. Paid $500 for it. Supposedly only needed a top end and to have the brakes filled back up with fluid and bled. The previous owner gave me the old piston. He said that he drained the brake fluid because he took the wheels off to put on new tires. It will be my first big bike that I've fixed. The bike came with a full tank of gas and a center stand. It also came with a side stand. I checked all the big things, chain and sprockets were good, it kicked over, tires looked new, pipe looked undented. I realized it had a broken throttle tube, it was missing the silencer, needed misc bolts, shift lever, air filter. Nothing big (yet). It looked like a great bike to fix up and sell. After looking at it in more detail, I have come up with a theory about its background. I think it raced by a guy who knew what he was doing. Then, it was crashed hard, guy got scared and sold it to the guy that I bought it from. The guy that I bought it from only had it for a week and got married. His wife was making him sell it. Maybe he'll be on here and recognize his bike. It has ProTaper bars, Boyseen reeds on stock cage, rear Excell rim, Front D.I.D. rim, Pro Circuit expansion chamber, P3 pipe skid plate, Motion Pro stickers. Just little things that add up. Crashed parts: Broken throttle tube, cracked clutch lever perch, broken rear brake fluid reservoir tab, bent rear brake disk, front brake blew, took out the 2 subframe bolts that hold the seat and rear plastics on, one side seat tab ripped out of seat, no air filter, rear fender airbox cover broke, no shift lever, no air filter, new D.I.D. front rim. I think the crash took out quite a few things, and he bought new ones to sell.
  5. Tarron

    YZ250 QUESTIONS

    Hi all, I am needing some help with my 2003 yz250, i have posted a thread up a couple weeks ago about my bike bogging and having no power. I've listened to everyone's opinions on what is going on and have tried to fix it. Now, i'm needing some help with the cylinder and head, jets, and the power valve. 1. I am going to replace the reeds with power reeds, Will i have to rejet or anything? or can i just throw them in and ride? I'm doing a fresh top end so want the bike to be running good when i first start it. 2. I bought new jets cause the old ones were blocked. The new ones are the same size as the old ones, i can just throw them in and the bike will run the same as if the old ones were still in? or will i need to mess around with something? 3. Is the cylinder head in good shape or bad? Is the cylinder in bad shape? If so, what is the cheapest way for now and for future rebuilds to fix it? What type of cylinder is it? Sleeved?, nikasil? 4. The power valve looks like it has alot of oil/carbon in there, how do i clean it and what do i clean it with? As seen in video, when i pull the power valve to me it stays like that, i thought it is supposed to go back in?
  6. Kevin from Wiseco

    Guide to Cylinder Prep for Your Top-End Rebuild

    Freshening up the top end in your dirt bike or ATV is a critical part of preventative maintenance. However, it’s not as simple as purchasing a new piston kit and dropping it in. Properly preparing your cylinder is equally as important as installing a quality piston. Cylinder prep recommendations are always included with the piston when ordering from Wiseco. Depending on your application, it will either say “deglaze / hone” or “bore & hone” or “bore / replate.” We’ll take a look at exactly what these different terms mean and how to perform these steps. Deglaze your Cylinder A common question is “Do I need to deglaze my cylinder?” The answer is: yes, unless it’s time for a replate or resleeve. If you’re engine has any time on it, the glazing process has begun. The term ‘glazed’ in this context refers to the motion of the piston ring(s) flattening out and polishing the surface of the cylinder wall during normal operation. The more time on the engine, the more glazed the cylinder is going to be. However, depending on how much time is on your engine and what type of cylinder you have, you may need to replate or resleeve, which we’ll discuss next. Notice the shiny surface of the cylinder wall. This cylinder has become glazed over time. Plated vs. Sleeved Cylinders If your Powersports engine was made in the last 2 decades or so, chances are it is plated with a Nikasil (Nickel Silicone Carbide), chrome, or electrofusion plating. Nikasil has been the latest and most commonly used cylinder coating due to its wear resistance qualities, but they do still wear out. We recommend checking your manual for normal top end rebuild times, but generally if your engine has long hours, the overall condition of your cylinder will need to be closely reviewed. This will include not only the bore size and plating condition, but also the cylinder roundness and taper in reference to OEM service specifications. There are a number of good companies that offer replating services, just do your research and choose a trusted company. Your cylinder should come back with fresh plating, honed, and ready to go after a quick cleaning. This cylinder has been replated and prepped for the rebuild. The cylinder wall surface is no longer reflective and glazed-looking. Other forms of cylinders that aren’t plated commonly have iron or steel/alloy sleeves. If your cylinder does have a sleeve, you should be able to see the seam between the sleeve and the actual cylinder. If you’re still not sure, check to see if a magnet sticks to the cylinder wall. If it sticks, it’s a sleeve, and if it doesn’t, it’s plated. Much like replating a cylinder after normal top end rebuild time, your sleeved cylinder should have a new sleeve installed. The same cylinder shops that do replating should do resleeving as well, and it will come back honed and ready to go back together. In short, if your engine has enough time on it to need a full top end rebuild, we recommend replating or resleeving your cylinder. Technically you can have your previously plated cylinder sleeved, but we recommend sticking with how it came from the OEM. If it is just freshening up with low hours on the engine, you should be able to just deglaze / hone. What is Honing and Why do I Need It? When your engine was made brand new in the factory, the cylinder was honed. Honing is a process of conditioning the surface of the cylinder wall to help with lubrication of the piston ring(s) during operation. Honing creates fine cross hatch imperfections on the surface of the cylinder bore. You can think of these imperfections as peaks and valleys in the surface of the metal. These are essential because it helps the cylinder wall retain oil to assist with piston ring lubrication. Theoretically, the idea is for there to be a very thin layer of oil between the edge of the piston rings and cylinder wall. If there was no oil to lubricate the constant contact with the cylinder wall, there would be too much friction and both the rings and cylinder would wear out quickly. The term ‘deglazing’ simply refers to re-honing your cylinder to put those peaks and valleys back in your cylinder wall. This crosshatch pattern on the wall of the cylinder is the goal of the honing. How to Hone your Cylinder The most common tools you’ll find for honing small engine applications are rigid or brush hones and ball hones. Hones can be ordered by size according to your cylinder bore, just cross reference your bore size with the information from the company you order your hone from. The hone company should also have recommendations on grit and material type based on what type of rings you have. After disassembling your top end, inspect your cylinder wall and ports for damage. If you had a piston seizure or something break, chances are the cylinder was damaged. Depending on how extensive the damage is, sometimes cylinder shops can repair them. If you see any questionable damage or deep scuffs, we recommend sending your cylinder to a trusted shop for their best recommendation. If your cylinder is in normal condition with no damage, and you’re just changing rings between top ends, honing should be the only thing required. If the glazing is minimal and you can still see a fair amount of cross hatch marks, you should be able to get away with using a rigid or brush hone to just restore those cross hatch marks. You should only have to hone for about 10 – 15 seconds at a time until you can see consistent cross hatch marks. A soft hone brush like this is one of the tools that may be used to prepare the interior surface of the cylinder. The ball hone will be a little bit more abrasive, which is why we don’t recommend using a ball hone on plated cylinders unless they are specified to be safe. If you do need to use a ball hone for heavier glazing on your sleeved cylinder, attach it to your drill and lubricate it with a light coat of motor oil. Make sure the cylinder is secured and stationary, and the ball hone is spinning before entering the cylinder. Hone the cylinder back and forth for about 10 – 15 seconds, then switch to the opposite spinning direction and repeat. Check the cylinder for the desired cross hatch marks, and repeat if necessary. After honing is complete, be sure to clean the cylinder thoroughly until there is no residual material. When reassembling your top end, always be sure to double check your piston to wall clearance. Do I Need to Bore my Cylinder? If the instructions for your new piston say “bore & hone” or “bore / replate,” it’s because you ordered a piston that is larger than the stock bore size. Instructions to bore and hone your cylinder means your cylinder did not come plated from the OEM, and only requires to be machined out to the correct size for your piston. However, if it is a sleeved cylinder, consider having it resleeved depending on the time on the engine. Instructions to bore and replate your cylinder means your cylinder came plated from the OEM, so the only work required is to have the cylinder machined to the correct size for your piston, and then replated / honed. We recommend having your local trusted cylinder shop do your boring and replating work. In any case, we recommend having the cylinder bored by a professional machinist with the proper equipment. Cylinder shops that replate and resleeve usually have the capability to bore as well. Don’t Forget to Chamfer and Clean Up After any boring or honing work on a cylinder, it’s important to chamfer all ports and the bottom of the cylinder. Chamfering is smoothing out any sharp edge to leave a symmetrical sloping edge. Creating sloped edges on the bottom of the cylinder allows for easier piston and ring installation. You also want to make sure that the edges of the ports in the cylinder have a nice slope as well so the piston rings don’t get caught on any edges during engine operation. If your cylinder has an exhaust bridge, be sure it is relieved .002” - .004” to allow for expansion. Exhaust bridge relief is important in certain 2-stroke applications. Read more about exhaust bridge relief here. Lastly, be sure to properly clean any parts that have been worked on. Cylinders that have been bored and/or honed will have residual honing grit. This must be removed by washing with warm soapy water until an oil dampened cloth does not show any grit after wiping the surface of the cylinder wall. Once clean, apply a thin coat of oil on the cylinder wall before proceeding with your rebuild. Always be sure to cover all your bases when freshening up the top end in your machine. Giving the required attention to all areas will help you be sure you’re getting the smoothest performance and most reliability out of your engine.
  7. idratherberiding

    AFTERMARKET CRANK 2016 300XC

    Hey I can't seem to find an aftermarket crank for my 2016 300XC. For some reason wiseco and prox don't make them. Are there any options other than stock? Thanks
  8. Rebuilt my 2015 ktm 250 sx, new crank,piston,bearings,seals,etc. Test rode and it has 1st gear and fifth gear but 2nd,3rd,and 4th is like it's in neutral. Any thoughts before I tear it down again? I'm wondering if it's the shift drum because I kept both shafts in the same sequence when I removed.
  9. Hello all, Thanks to Thumpertalk I dared to plunge into the deep and do a rebuild of the top-end of my 2012 YZ250 myself. 10hrs and still going strong. But the reason I did the rebuild (other than that the time has come), was that there was also another issue that I was hoping to fix. I'll walk you through the symptoms: Start up of the bike (cold) in cold or hot weather w choke. (PS: I think the problem is a little better in cold weather) Bike starts up in one kick if kicked correctly. The bike smokes, but normal amount to a 2stroke. After a 10 or so seconds, when I blip the throttle, ALOT of smoke comes from the exhaust (white smoke). It also doesn't ping but bogs (bwaaa) when I go on the throttle. Sometimes its so severe that it dies during the bog. When I start my ride on the track, the bike doesn't ping and I don't have much power + still excessive smoke. But when I hold the throttle WIDE OPEN for 10 or so seconds, then it starts to 'clear out' and begins to haul *ss. The smoke also disappears and the engine starts to ping again. The bike runs fine after that while its cleared out on the track. I thought this was a sign that I should change the top end (30hrs, novice) and clean the carburetor. What did I do: Completely clean and dissasembly the carburetors and jets. Change the piston, rings, gaskets,.... Replace spark plug. The problem seemed to be gone the first time that I started the bike after the rebuild (first kick yeahah!). But it quickly came back and is even identical to before the rebuild. Now I thought the cause is the following: Crankshaft seal leak at the clutch side. --> But I just checked my transmission fluid after 4-6hrs of riding and it's 650cm³ after the 750cm² I filled it with. That seems to be about normal consumption, no? Coolant leakage somewhere inside the combustion chamber --> Triple checked: not losing coolant. The following suspects: Float height Crankseal leakage Pilot jet wrong (I checked that the standard one is installed). I'm at a dead-end here. I don't have the friends with the knowledge to ask these questions to. But I'm laying my faith in the hands of thumpertalk :). If there is something I can do to test something for you guys, let met know. Kind regards, Dries This is the me, my bike and the issue (it got a bit worse over time :p). Yes I know I shouldn't be so hard on the throttle when I start it, but for one time its not bad and it was necessary to show the problem.
  10. ColeMystrom

    CR250 Compression Loss

    Hey guys, My buddy and I just finished rebuilding his 1998 CR250 which we bought with a broken connecting rod. We replaced the main bearings, crank, gaskets, seals, piston, and the cylinder bored and honed to match the new piston. I did a compression test before it ever started and read about 150 PSI. Then we started it. Ran well, but wanted to die whenever we hit the powerband (this is after we let it idle to break in the seals for twenty minutes) anyway it died a couple times always started right back up until it didn't. I did another compression test and got about 90 PSI. I refuse to believe the rings are stuck, but I guess it is possible. I took the head off and the piston looks fine. Oh also we found some small beads of coolant around the head. I ordered another head gasket (OEM) since I read that the tusk head gaskets don't work great. That won't be here until next week so I thought I'd ask you guys if I'm on the right track in the meantime. Thanks.
  11. #forkrebuild#dirtbike
  12. Wiseco's new Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits offer everything you need for a bottom and top end rebuild. From the crank to the piston kit, and even an hour meter to track maintenance, everything is included in one box. Here we take a look at the components included, and the technology behind them. So, the time has come for an engine rebuild. Hopefully it’s being done as a practice of proper maintenance, but for many it will be because of an engine failure. Whether the bottom end, top end, or both went out, the first step is to disassemble and inspect. After determining any damage done to engine cases or the cylinder, and arranging for those to be repaired/replaced, you’re faced with choosing what internal engine components to buy, where to get them, and how much the costs are going to add up. A full engine rebuild is a serious job and requires a lot of parts to be replaced, especially in four-strokes. You have to think of bottom end bearings and seals, a crankshaft assembly, piston, rings, clips, wristpin, and the plethora of gaskets required for reassembly. If you’re doing this rebuild yourself, or having your local shop do the labor, chances are you don’t have a factory team budget to spend on parts. However, you know you want high-quality and durable parts, because you don’t want to find yourself doing this again anytime soon. Rebuilding a dirt bike engine is an involved job, requiring many parts to be replaced. Missing one seal or gasket can put the whole rebuild on hold. You could source all the different parts you need from different vendors to find the best combination of quality and affordability. But, it can get frustrating when 6 different packages are coming from 6 different vendors at different times, and each one relies on the next for you to complete your rebuild. Wiseco is one of the manufacturers that has been offering top end kits (including piston, rings, clips, gaskets, and seals) all in one box, under one part number for many years. Complete bottom end rebuild kits are also available from Wiseco, with all necessary parts under one part number. So, it seemed like a no brainer to combine the top and bottom end kits, and throw in a couple extra goodies to make your complete engine rebuild in your garage as hassle free as possible. Top-end piston kits and bottom-end kits come together to create Wiseco Garage Buddy rebuild kits. Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are exactly as the name implies, the buddy you want to have in your garage that has everything ready to go for your engine rebuild. Garage Buddy engine rebuild kits come with all parts needed to rebuild the bottom and top end, plus an hour meter—with a Garage Buddy specific decal—to track critical maintenance intervals and identify your rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. The kits include: Crankshaft assembly OEM quality main bearings All engine gaskets, seals, and O-rings Wiseco standard series forged piston kit (piston, ring(s), pin, clips) Small end bearing (for two-strokes) Cam chain (for four-strokes) Hour meter with mounting bracket and hour meter decal Open up a Garage Buddy kit, and you'll find all the components you need to rebuild your bottom and top end. 2-stroke and 4-stroke Whether your machine of choice is a 2-stroke or a 4-stroke, Wiseco can help you with your rebuild. 2-stroke Wiseco Garage Buddy kits include everything listed above, featuring a Wiseco forged Pro-Lite piston kit. You don’t even have to worry about sourcing a small-end bearing, that’s included too. 2-stroke fans often brag about the ability to rebuild their bikes so much cheaper than their 4-stroke counterparts, and they’ll have even more ammo for bragging now with these kits starting in the $400 range. A Wiseco 2-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, plus an hour meter to track your next maintenance intervals. However, don’t abandon your 4-stroke yet. Many riders cringe—and rightfully so—at the thought of rebuilding their 4-stroke because of the costs associated, but Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kits starting in the $600s takes a lot of sting off your rebuild project. They even include a new timing chain. No matter what you’re rebuilding, you’ll be able to track key maintenance intervals for your fresh engine with the Wiseco hour meter and log book that’s included in the Garage Buddy kits. All Garage Buddy kits include a specific hour meter decal as well, which is important for the limited warranty to identify the rebuild as a Garage Buddy rebuild. A Wiseco 4-stroke Garage Buddy kit includes all the parts you'll need for piston and crankshaft replacement, including a cam chain and an hour meter. Ease of ordering Wiseco Garage Buddy kits come with the listed parts boxed up in one box, and listed under one part number, which makes it nice to not have to worry about if you might’ve missed something when ordering. Simply find the single part number for your model, order, and you’re on your way to brand new performance. Quality Performance, backed by a Limited Warranty Ordering convenience doesn’t make a difference if the parts do not provide quality and reliability. Wiseco crankshafts are designed completely by in-house engineers, who determine all assembled dimensions, clearances, materials, and specifications. These specifications have been determined from R&D tests such as hand inspection, dyno, and failure analysis. Once Wiseco cranks have been manufactured to exact specifications they are batch inspected, and critical tolerances and dimensions are measured. Major inspections and tests include crank run-out and trueness, because they must operate within a strict tolerance to last long and perform well. Wiseco crankshafts and bearings are manufactured and tested according to strict tolerances and clearances, including run-out and trueness. Crankshaft designs are also tested for 4 hours at WOT. Bearings are another critical point of inspection. Wiseco has worked to build relationships with top-tier bearing suppliers to provide a long lasting, low-friction product. Debris in a bearing can lead to very fast wear, and Wiseco makes it a point to inspect batches of bearings for cleanliness and proper operation. As part of the design and engineering process, prototype crankshafts are hand inspected and dyno-tested at wide open throttle for 4 consecutive hours. This is a benchmark test, and new crankshaft designs must pass it before to be deemed worthy for manufacturing. Watch our crank R&D and inspection process. A Warranty on Engine Internals? Yes! Wiseco is committed to providing performance and reliability in all their products. This is why Garage Buddy kits come with a limited warranty. Rebuild your engine with a Garage Buddy kit, and your new Wiseco components are covered against manufacturer defects for 90 days from the date of purchase, or 10 hours logged on the hour meter, whichever comes first. Check out all the warranty details on the detail sheet in your new Garage Buddy kit. Open up your Garage Buddy kit and you'll find a detail sheet on the warranty on your new components. Forged Pistons The top end kits included in Garage Buddy kits feature a Wiseco forged piston, which are designed, forged, and machined completely in-house in the U.S.A. Four-stroke Garage Buddy kits come with a Wiseco standard forged piston, which offers stock compression and more reliability and longevity, thanks to the benefits of the forging process. Two-stroke Garage Buddy kits include a Wiseco Pro-Lite forged piston, which is the two-stroke piston that has been providing two-stroke riders quality and reliability for decades. Some applications, two and four-stroke, even feature ArmorGlide skirt coating, reducing friction and wear for the life of the piston. Forged aluminum has an undeniable advantage in strength over cast pistons, thanks to the high tensile strength qualities of aluminum with aligned grain flow. Read more about our forging process here, and get all the details on our coatings here. All Wiseco pistons are forged in-house from aluminum. Some pistons may also come with ArmorGlide skirt coating, and some 2-stroke pistons may already have exhaust bridge lubrication holes pre-drilled. All pistons are machined on state-of-the-art CNC machine equipment, then hand finished and inspected for quality. The forged pistons come complete with wrist pin, clips, and high-performance ring(s). Lastly, all gaskets and seals are made by OEM quality manufactures. Sealing components are not something to ever go cheap on, because no matter how high-quality your moving components are, if your engine is not sealing properly, it’s coming back apart. Need some tips on breaking in your fresh engine? Check this out. Gaskets and seals provided in Wiseco Garage Buddy kits are OEM quality, ensuring your freshly rebuilt engine is properly sealed.
  13. YZ_Chris

    Top end rebuild

    Just ordered a oem top end kit for my 1999 YZ125. The bike runs perfectly, I'm just rebuilding for preventative measures. Is my cylinder nikasil plated? I ordered a ball hone since my cylinder is glazed. After some research I discovered that honing a two stroke cylinder isn't a good idea because of the ports. I'm taking my cylinder to get measured to see if I'm still in spec. I also will be measuring the ring gap with a feeler gage. Anything I'm missing to make this top end rebuild go flawlessly?
  14. Anyone have any tips on rebuilding a bottom end on a 2012 WR450? It's been like 30 years since I rebuilt a bottom end on a 2 stroke, and I have a friend local who I can fall back on if I have issues. I recently broke the case where the clutch arm actuator is, and the seal is leaking pretty bad (Chain guide broke off from the swing-arm and came around). I tried to replace the seal, but no luck. Off the top of my head, I have approximately 500 hours on the bottom. The head was rebuilt a year ago by fast heads, and at that time, I also replaced the timing chain, piston rings, cam chain tensioner. I haven't checked the hours and this is 1 of my 2 bikes, so pretty sure the parts mentioned can be re-used (maybe max 30 hours). I was thinking rings and wrist pin bearing max for the top. For the bottom.. Re-use the crank, or get a new one? I see you can buy the Rod, Pin, and Bearing for about half the price, but then I'd need to find a machine shop to put it together right. What about the Oil pump? Looking at the parts diagram, there is a pump assembly and a rotor assembly.. are both these wear items? You guys pull the motor out with the head and then disassemble, or take the head/cylinder off before removal? Do new cases come with most of the bearings and seals installed, or is that something I'll have to buy and install? Thanks.
  15. Doing a rebuild on Honda 1990 XR200. Dirt bike came with new piston. However, I measured the cylinder diameter and it’s 2.983 inches. Specs says it needs to between 2.2.5787 and 2.5791 inches. Service limit says 2.583 inches. Will this bike run? I’m doing this more as a learning experience. I don’t want to put a lot of money in it, however I do want it to run good enough to ride on some trails. Thanks.
  16. Hey everyone, After noticing my clutch was starting slip several weeks ago I decided to buy a replacement kit from Tusk (Competition Plates & Springs) and hope that a fresh install would fix my problem. I have installed this very same kit in my bike about two years ago without any issue (that I can remember), so I figured this would be a pretty quick fix as long as the clutch basket wasn't damaged. I opened the clutch cover up and after not noticing any unusual wear or damage inside, I installed the new clutch plates and springs without issue. After I put the bike back together I noticed my clutch lever pull felt extremely light, and that no matter how much I pumped the lever it would not build any pressure. So, I reverse bled my clutch and regained a normal-ish clutch pull. However, after starting the bike up and shifting in to gear it immediately started trying to roll away (I had the brake covered), and I found it extremely difficult to shift gears at this point. While this is going on I also started to notice a lovely burning smell coming from my clutch so I shut the bike off, and re-did everything I mentioned above from reinstalling plates to bleeding the clutch. The result when I started it up again was the same and at this point I am out of ideas. Does anyone have any suggestions on what might be causing this issue? Thanks in advance. Smallen
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