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Found 5 results

  1. Is your clutch having problems engaging and disengaging? Do you feel inconsistency through the clutch lever when operating the clutch? A worn clutch basket could be the cause. In this article, we’ll look at diagnosing a worn clutch basket, review replacement options, and step through the process of replacing the clutch basket so that the next time you need to tackle the job, you’re well prepared. Time to replace your clutch basket? Read on for a step-by-step on getting your clutch working smoothly again! Diagnosing the Issue Any clutch issues that a machine may have are typically very apparent to the rider because there is a complementary feeling of loss of control of the machine. The machine won’t become outright unrideable; however, subtleties that quickly become annoying will arise when utilizing the clutch. Most notably, modulation of the clutch may become more difficult, and the clutch feel will be inconsistent. Before taking the machine apart, verifying possible simple issues such as clutch cable adjustment and that the engine or gearbox oil has been maintained regularly should be confirmed. To inspect and disassemble the clutch, the procedures outlined in the machine’s factory service manual should be followed. Once the clutch has been removed from the engine, inspecting its condition is straightforward. Double check that any issues you may be experiencing are in fact caused by a worn basket and not from a different culprit, like a clutch cable. Click here for tips on replacing a clutch cable. The basket consists of a series of “fingers,” or “tangs” which mate with the friction discs. The basket fingers drive the friction discs. The friction discs slide out when the clutch is engaged and back in when the clutch is disengaged. Due to this interaction, notching can occur on the edges of the basket fingers. Any notching that can be felt with a pick or a fingernail can be potentially problematic. In terms of clutch basket wear, the main grounds for replacement of the basket are worn and grooved basket fingers. Notching on basket tangs is typically part of normal wear and is the main reason to warrant basket replacement. Replacement Options The clutch basket is a great component to upgrade since it has surfaces such as the basket fingers that are inherently wear surfaces. Selecting a ProX basket, which is significantly stronger and more wear resistant than OE baskets, has a high return on investment in terms of reduced maintenance and improved performance. ProX clutch baskets are precision machined from forged 7075-T6 aluminum, which is one of the strongest alloys on the market. Wear resistance is ensured by utilizing a sophisticated hard anodizing process. A final layer of performance is added in the form of a Teflon coating which seals the basket surfaces and allows the friction discs to slide effortlessly over the clutch basket fingers while in operation. ProX clutch baskets are forged from aluminum, precision machined, and hard anodized and Teflon coated for smooth clutch actuation. The tensile strength of the material combined with the coatings make notching the basket tangs almost impossible. Find ProX clutch components for your bike or ATV here! Tools Required The clutch basket is an assembly of parts including the basket, starter gear, clutch driven gear, dampers, and backing plate. The starter gear is pressed into the clutch basket, and the driven gear, dampers, and backing plate are riveted or screwed in place. When it comes to tools, you’ll need the following, outside of your standard tools used to remove the clutch from the machine: Hydraulic press or vice - capable of exerting up to 8 tons of force. Center punch, drill and drill bits, or grinder, or mill - for removing the rivets Punch and hammer - for driving the rivets out of the assembly Torque wrench and Loctite - for securing the screws in the new basket Fixturing - for adequately supporting the basket while removing and installing the starter gear. The fixturing doesn’t have to be anything fancy, and examples are provided later in this article. There a number of tools required to do the job correctly. For example, having the ability to properly press the starter gear out and in is key to retaining proper function. The Process We’re going to jump into the process post clutch removal and focus on servicing the basket. ProX clutch baskets include new dampers and screws along with instructions for your specific application. The following instructions should be considered supplementary. Mark the backing plate and gear - Use a marker to mark the outside surfaces of the backing plate and gear. Doing so will ensure that these parts are installed in the correct direction when reassembled. Removing the rivets - It is preferable to drill the rivet heads off, however, grinding and milling the heads off are also acceptable options. When drilling, it is best to start by using a center punch to indent the center of the rivet so that the drill bit will not walk. Once center punched, start with a small drill bit and work up to a bit that is slightly smaller in diameter than the rivet itself. Only drill down far enough to remove the head from the rivet. Typically, a depth of 0.040 - 0.080” (1-2mm) below the surface is all that is required to drill out the rivet head. After the rivet head has been drilled out, use a punch and hammer to drive the rivet out of the assembly. The most recommended method to remove the rivets is to drill the heads off then use a punch to remove the rest of the rivet completely. Remove the driven gear - Pull the backplate off before removing the driven gear. Note the orientation of the dampers. Take the driven gear off, then remove the dampers. Make sure you note the orientation of the dampers before removing them all after removing the driven gear. Remove the starter gear - The starter gear utilizes an interference fit with the clutch basket, so it will have to be pressed out. The exact geometry of the starter gear will be model specific. Some starter gears will feature teeth that bite into the clutch basket. Depending on the starter gear geometry and geometry of the clutch basket, it is possible the clutch basket will be destroyed during the removal process. Starter gears will differ depending on the model. Make sure it's adequately supported to press out without damaging the gear. Adequately support the clutch basket around its base so that loads applied will transfer through the center of the basket. Standoffs may need to be utilized to support the basket properly. Select an appropriately sized spacer to place between the starter gear and press. Appropriately sized sockets can serve as suitable spacers. Carefully press the gear out of the hub. There's a good chance the old basket may break when pressing the starter gear out. This is fine, the focus is on not damaging the gear itself. Clean the parts - Remove any clinging material from the starter gear, clean the driven gear and backplate. Install the starter gear - Apply engine oil to the outside of the starter gear. Carefully position it in the center of the new clutch basket. Before pressing it in, be sure to confirm any specific press-in depth requirements outlined in the instructions. Ensure the clutch basket is adequately supported before pressing the gear in place. The press force required to install the gear will be model specific and highlighted in the installation instructions. Be sure to oil the starter gear and note any depth and force specifications for your specific application. On some models, a simple shrink fit is utilized to install the starter gear. When this process is specified, follow the heating instructions for the clutch basket. Once up to temperature, carefully drop in the starter gear. Install the driven gear and dampers - Place the driven gear on the clutch basket noting any orientation requirements previously identified. Install the new dampers in the correct orientation. Install your new dampers in the correct orientation and reinstall the primary gear. Install the backplate - Double check the orientation of the dampers and driven gear. Install the backplate onto the clutch basket, noting any orientation requirements. Torque the backplate screws - Consult the installation instructions for the proper torque specs, apply Loctite if the screws are not pre-Loctite, then tighten in a cross-pattern. Reinstall your back plate with new screws and thread locking compound and torque them to spec. At this point, the clutch basket is ready for service and can be reinstalled on the engine. Refer to your service manual for assembly instructions and specifications to reinstall your clutch and button up the engine. The process of replacing a clutch basket is straightforward and can be executed by anyone so long as the necessary steps are followed and tools are available. We hope this write-up simplifies the job and helps our fellow riders and racers get back out there performing better than before!
  2. So the rear shock on my 2005 wr450f blew and I couldn't get into the shop for 4 days and it was the weekend. So guess what, I wanted to ride! And not on a blown shock. There was a 2009 yz450f part out that still had the rear shock, 120$ was worth the gamble and I could resell it if it didn't work. It was 2 hours of driving and another hour and a half of setting up and replacing the shock but I tell you was it worth it! Not to mention I would have paid 200$ for labour alone to rebuild my older style shock plus whatever materials they need to replace. Well I've rode it pretty hard, no big air so I don't think I actually compressed all the way but! The way the shock moves it gets further away from everything that it's close to theoretically it shouldn't hit anything. I'm nothing but stoked and I'll return when I actually do get some decent air and let you know the results but for now I'm saying it works and is definitely and improved shock than the older style. The top 2 pics are the new one and the bottom are the old.
  3. The piston is one of many wear items in your powersports machine. It may last longer than tires or a chain, but it should still be treated as normal maintenance when the time comes. Here, we go through key tips to help you know when it's time for a refresh. The piston in an internal combustion engine is arguably one of the most important components found in the engine. When it comes to high-performance engines used in powersports applications, it is also a component that is regularly replaced and serviced. Knowing when your piston should be replaced and how it wears is key to maintaining a reliable engine. To help you make that decision, we laid out replacement intervals, piston wear, why it’s important to replace the piston, and piston replacement options. Piston replacement intervals are typically outlined in your machine’s factory service manual. Using dirt bikes as an example, many manufacturers outline a piston and ring replacement schedule of every six races or 15-30 hours for a four-stroke, depending on the machine. If you’re new to the sport or have never looked at your factory service manual, these service intervals may seem shockingly short. The service intervals are based on the service schedules required to maintain a high-level racer’s machine. Unfortunately, for the average rider, the outlined service intervals commonly end up being conservative. The recommended piston service intervals outlined in your manual may be shocking, but the actual required service time depends on many variables that differ by each rider. In reality, piston replacement intervals should be established based on how the individual owner rides and maintains their machine. It’s true that forged pistons exhibit greater strength and wear resistance, but the variables of rider and maintenance still apply. Engine displacement, engine make, air filter maintenance, environmental conditions, riding style, and the type of riding the machine is used for will all influence how long the engine should be operated before servicing it. Monitoring the engine’s health through periodic checks such as compression and leak down tests is the best way most riders can appropriately time major service tasks, such as piston and ring replacement. Due to the number of variables that affect engine wear, it is simply not possible to specify a replacement schedule that fits everyone’s needs other than a very conservative schedule. Realistically, there are too many variables to establish an official recommended piston replacement time. Sticking to the short time recommended in the manual can be overkill for some, but keeps things on the safe side. (We are not endorsing dry assembly with this photo, it was just mocked up for photo purposes.) Piston wear will typically occur in four key areas for both two and four-stroke engines, which include the piston skirt, wrist pin bore, ring grooves, and piston crown. The next time you disassemble your top end, keep an eye out for these wear points. Piston Skirt Wear Nowadays, on four-stroke engines, the piston skirt is very short and limited to the major and minor thrust faces of the piston. For reference, the thrust faces correspond with the intake and exhaust valve sides of the cylinder head. Two-stroke pistons use the same nomenclature, but feature much longer, more pronounced skirts. Piston skirts experience load on the major and minor thrust sides, resulting in wear in those areas. Piston skirt wear occurs because of the thrust loading that results from the inherent geometry of the crank mechanism as the engine fires. Peak combustion pressure occurs slightly after top dead center, which causes the piston to thrust into the cylinder wall. Skirt wear can be observed both visually and by measuring the skirt’s diameter and referencing it against the diameter outlined in your service manual. Skirt wear will appear as a polished area on the major and minor thrusting faces of the piston. Notice the polished-looking wear marks on the forged piston on the left, and the vertical wear marks on two-stroke cast piston on the right. These reflect wear after a substantial amount of run time. The grooves on the two-stroke piston are a potential sign of dust/dirt in the cylinder. Your pistons may feature one of a few different types of skirt coating. Wiseco pistons utilize different types of skirt coatings depending on the piston, including ArmorGlide and ArmorFit coatings. These coatings are screen printed on and are applied to remain on the skirt for the life of the piston. You will likely see some wear on the skirt coating after putting time on your piston(s), but if it is worn all the way through the coating, there’s a good chance there’s an underlying issue that needs investigation. Too little clearance, foreign material in the cylinder, and improper cylinder preparation could be causes of excessive skirt wear. This piston is equipped with ArmorGlide skirt coating. However, the wear patterns are indicative of the possibility of foreign material, such as dirt, making its way into the cylinder. On two-stroke engines, skirt wear can occasionally be heard audibly while the engine is running, which is commonly known as “piston slap”. A rhythmic metallic sound often accompanies a loose or worn piston when the engine idles. What can be heard is the piston rocking back and forth in its bore as it reciprocates. Piston Crown Piston crown wear will occur as a result of aggressive or improper tuning, and on four-stroke engines, a damaged or mis-timed valvetrain. Engines operated with a lean mixture at full throttle will see abnormally high combustion temps, which can cause detonation. The results of detonation will be visible on the piston crown as a pitted or eroded surface. The pitting in the center is a pretty clear sign of detonation. In many cases, pitting and erosion will be much more evident the leaner the running conditions. Piston crown damage due to valvetrain contact will be visible as indentations or cracks near the valve pockets. Valvetrain contact can occur due to valve float caused by excessive RPM or mis-timed valves. Notice the half-circles in the valve reliefs. This is a clear sign of valve contact with the piston. Ring Groove Wear The piston rings move in and out of their grooves because of the ignition of the air/fuel mixture in the combustion chamber. Once the mixture is ignited, the cylinder pressure increases which energizes the compression ring and forces it against the cylinder wall, causing it to slide in its groove. On four-stroke engines, the compression ring will transition from seating on the bottom of the ring groove to the top ring groove at the end of the exhaust stroke due to forces of inertia acting on the ring. Ring movement during operation will eventually wear ring grooves beyond their designed size. Substantial run time can also leave carbon deposits in the ring grooves, affecting ring seal and performance. Ring and groove wear can occur due to the sliding and reciprocating motion of the rings and can be exasperated by carbon deposits that accumulate in the ring groove. Ring and groove wear can be qualified by thoroughly cleaning the ring and groove and then measuring each. Most service manuals outline specifications for ring width, groove width, and piston ring to ring groove clearance. Ring wear can be easily visually observed, but can be confirmed by taking axial height and radial width measurements and comparing them to the original spec. Wrist Pin Bore Wear Wrist pin bore wear occurs as a result of the loading of the wrist pin joint through inertia and combustion loading. The wrist pin bore will typically wear into an oblong shape. In some engines, wrist pin bore wear will be visible in the top and bottom of the bore. Usually, a portion of the bore will appear burnished or polished. Alternatively, the wrist pin bore can be measured from top to bottom and from side to side. Both measurements can be compared to one another to determine how much the bore has become out of round and to the diameters specified in the service manual. Wrist pin bores typically wear into a vertical, oval shape due to the pushing and pulling forces of engine operation. Visual inspection can show excessive wear, and a vertical and horizontal diameter measurement can tell you how out of round it is. If it's proving out of round, it's probably time for a replacement. The importance of replacing the piston at regular intervals in high-performance powersports engines cannot be overstated. If left unattended, the resulting cumulative wear of the piston will eventually result in a catastrophic and expensive engine failure. Typically, too much time on a piston can lead to gradual and finally complete failure of the skirt in both two and four-stroke engines. Between aftermarket suppliers and OEMs, replacement piston options are plentiful and can be overwhelming. The most common upgrade and consideration most riders are faced with is whether or not to move to a forged piston. Forged pistons can be a nice upgrade for many riders because they can offer additional strength and wear resistance over cast pistons. Forged pistons achieve greater strength than cast pistons by using different aluminum alloys and manufacturing processes. The forging process for pistons results in finished components that have a tighter molecular structure and grain flow optimized for strength. Comparatively, cast pistons are not cast under high pressures and have molecular structures that are not as tight or organized, which in severe cases, can lead to voids, inclusions, and air pockets. Forging pistons results in a better-aligned grain flow and higher tensile strength. Read more about how Wiseco forges pistons here. Wiseco has been forging pistons in the U.S. for decades and has spent countless hours on research and development to make their forged pistons the option that best combines performance and wear resistance. Still, there is a lifespan to a piston, and the above tips should be used to practice regular maintenance on your machine.
  4. Hi, I have a 1991 Suzuki dr250s . Will any other make and model carb work on the dr250s?
  5. Hey everyone, After noticing my clutch was starting slip several weeks ago I decided to buy a replacement kit from Tusk (Competition Plates & Springs) and hope that a fresh install would fix my problem. I have installed this very same kit in my bike about two years ago without any issue (that I can remember), so I figured this would be a pretty quick fix as long as the clutch basket wasn't damaged. I opened the clutch cover up and after not noticing any unusual wear or damage inside, I installed the new clutch plates and springs without issue. After I put the bike back together I noticed my clutch lever pull felt extremely light, and that no matter how much I pumped the lever it would not build any pressure. So, I reverse bled my clutch and regained a normal-ish clutch pull. However, after starting the bike up and shifting in to gear it immediately started trying to roll away (I had the brake covered), and I found it extremely difficult to shift gears at this point. While this is going on I also started to notice a lovely burning smell coming from my clutch so I shut the bike off, and re-did everything I mentioned above from reinstalling plates to bleeding the clutch. The result when I started it up again was the same and at this point I am out of ideas. Does anyone have any suggestions on what might be causing this issue? Thanks in advance. Smallen
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