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Found 121 results

  1. 2 reviews

    XC Rings - Replacement Rings Sold per cylinder Wiseco rings fit Wiseco pistons only For +.010 oversized pistons
  2. Ben99

    Kawasaki KX125 (1986)

    0 comments

    Awesome bike! Rips up the dirt
  3. 0 comments

    Tons of power, bored out to a 380, really fast. low hours and barn kept. great machine. thinking of a 1300 hyabusa twin turbo engine swap. am i crazy?
  4. Proper engine break-in is equally as important as a proper rebuild. Here, we'll go over a checklist to make your build will last, as well as a step-by-step break-in process. Putting in the time and money to rebuild your motorcycle engine is both a critical job and a prideful accomplishment. The feeling of an engine failure right after a rebuild is a sinking one, and will most likely stir up a mixture of frustration and disappointment. We want to help as many people as we can avoid that feeling. So, we've put together a review checklist for your rebuild, followed by a general engine break-in procedure, because your motorcycle should bring joy and fun to your life, not take tufts of hair out of your head. We'll start with a quick review on the motorcycle top end rebuild. Be sure these critical steps and precautions have been taken. If you find any concerning discrepancies, it's worth it to pull back apart and double check. Be sure that you have proper piston to cylinder clearance. Recently, a cylinder was bored with requested .0035” clearance. This machine shop has been in the area for over 30 years. When complete, it looked like it was tighter. He slipped the piston through the cylinder a few times and said, "It's okay." He was asked to check again, which he refused, and said that it was correct, and that he was too busy. Back in the Brew Bikes shop, it was double-checked, and clearance was .0015”. Yes, way too tight. Don’t just take someone’s word that clearance is correct, always double check it! Always double check your piston-to-wall clearance. Was the honing of the cylinder properly done? Honing is required to be done after boring, and if the cylinder was not bored, it still is needed to deglaze the cylinder for proper ring break-in. Different honing tools are better used for different applications, with common tools being brush hones and flex hones. Safe grits and hone materials depend on the cylinder finish, so check your manual or with the cylinder shop for a recommendation. Be sure that the crosshatch is at 45 degrees. The proper crosshatch will retain the proper amount of lubricating oil while allowing the rings and piston to break-in. Too little of crosshatch or too much will not allow the rings to break-in correctly and never get the proper sealing they were designed for. Read our full guide to cylinder prep. After proper honing and deglazing, your cylinder wall should have a consistent, 45 degree crosshatch. If the bike is a 2 stroke don’t forget to chamfer the ports. If it has a bridge in the exhaust port, most pistons require this area to be relieved. READ the piston specs, and if you don’t understand, be sure to reach out to Wiseco for specifications. Read our guide to relieving the exhaust bridge in 2-stroke cylinders. A critical step in 2-stroke cylinder prep is port edge relief and exhaust bridge relief. This will help ensure smooth piston and ring operation, and combat accelerated ring wear. Be certain that the ring gap is within specification. Don’t assume it is correct, check it. Always double check your ring end gap. With your compression ring in the cylinder, measure the end gap with a feeler gauge to ensure it's within the spec included in your piston instructions. Proper cleaning of the cylinder. Before you start cleaning make sure the gasket areas are clean with no residue of gasket or sealers. First, use a cleaning solvent with a brush and then again with a rag. This is not enough, and you will need to clean with dish soap and water. Using a clean rag you will be amazed on how much grit from the honing is still in the cylinder. Be sure to clean the piston also. Thoroughly cleaning your cylinder for a rebuild is critical. Be sure all old gasket material is removed, and use a 2-step cleaning process of solvent with a brush and rag, followed by soap and water. When the cylinder is clean and dry, you should be able to wipe the cylinder wall with a clean rag and not see any honing material residue. Then before assembly, use plenty of assembly lube on the cylinder and the piston. Don’t forget to lube the piston pin and bearing along with the rings. Assembly lube on the piston, rings, cylinder, pin, and bearing is important for proper break-in. Many rings have a topside for proper sealing. Double check this and be sure the proper ring is on the proper landing on the piston. Again, read the instructions that came with the piston. Piston ring markings vary, but the marking should always face up when installed on the piston. The gaskets and quality play an important part of engine rebuilding. If a gasket is thicker than the original, it could result in a loss of power. Worse yet, a gasket thinner than the original will result in less deck height (piston to head clearance). This reduced clearance may result the piston to come in contact of the head causing permanent damage. After placing the gaskets, be sure while assembling the piston in the cylinder that the ring gaps are in proper placement. Check your engine manual for proper placement of the piston gaps. Then, install the head. Many motorcycle manufacturers have a desired head nut tightening sequence. Refer to their procedures while doing this. Most companies give the head nut torque rating with the washers, nuts and studs being clean and dry. That means if you use oil or a thread locking compound the studs will be over-stressed due to the over-tightening of the head nuts. Engines have been damaged by this. Now you know, follow what the engine manufacturer recommends! Regardless of the type of motorcycle engine you're working on, there should be a tightening sequence and torque spec for the head nuts. Pay close attention to the specs in the manual, as these are critical to prevent damage and for proper operation. Use the proper engine oil and fill to the proper level. The fuel you use should be fresh and of the proper octane. If your engine is a 2 stroke, mix to the proper fuel/oil ratio. For just about any 2-stroke, whether vintage or a newer, a 32:1 fuel/oil mixture is very common, but check your manual for the recommended ratio. Not only is it important for piston lubrication, but also for the crank bearings and seals. After all this work has been done, and you feel confident with the rebuild, what else can go wrong? PROPER ENGINE BREAK-IN! So many mistakes can happen while breaking in the piston and rings, resulting in rings never properly sealing or/and piston galling. Many builders have their own procedures, but most all do heat cycling for breaking in engines. Before we get into it, please note that this is just one of many methods that work well for engine break-in. Many people have many different effective methods, this is just one example that has worked well for us. Use this break-in procedure as a guideline for your next fresh top end: It's important to ask yourself if the rebuilt engine is still using the same carburetor, air cleaner, exhaust system, cam, compression, or if a 2-stroke, the same port work configuration? Any changes can result in air/fuel mixtures to be either too rich or too lean, resulting in engine damage. If your engine is fuel injected and in good working order, the ECU and O2 sensor should keep the air/fuel mixture correct. If you have access to an air/fuel meter, or if a 2-stroke, an EGT (Exhaust Gas Temperature) gauge, check the air/fuel mixture. Even with these tools, spark plug readings are still recommended. Spark plug readings are a sure-fire way of knowing if your engine is running too lean or too rich. We'll get into more detail in a later article, but generally the plug will look white when it's too lean, and dark brown or black and wet when too rich. At first start up, keep the engine just above idle and give it a few revs up and down. This power on and power off RPM breaks in the piston and rings evenly on the intake and exhaust sides. If air cooled, once the engine builds up heat where it becomes too hot to touch, shut the engine off. If water-cooled, once the engine coolant starts rising in temperature, shut the engine off. This initial warm up takes just a couple minutes. Now wait a few minutes until the engine is slightly warm to the touch, repeat #2, letting the engine get slightly hotter. Be sure to keep the engine RPMs above normal idle and keep the RPMs going up and down slowly. Let it cool again till it is slightly warm to the touch. This time, start and run longer until the engine gets near operating temperature. If air cooled, be sure you have a fan pushing air from the front. You now can rev the RPMs up a little higher, being sure not to hold it at a sustained RPM, but revving it up and down. Let the engine cool completely. Check all fluid levels to be sure there is no loss of engine lubricant, or, if water-cooled, engine coolant. After engine is cool, do a plug reading to be sure it is not running lean. Because the engine has run a few heat cycles, the gaskets may have compressed. It is VERY IMPORTANT to be sure engine is totally cooled down, and then check the torque of the cylinder head nuts. Most times the cycling head nuts will need some re-tightening. DON’T over-tighten; just tighten to manufacturers’ specification as you did when assembling the engine. Next, warm up the engine for a couple minutes as you did in the other procedures. Ride the bike, revving the engine up to normal riding RPM. Be sure NOT to keep the RPM too low and don’t lug the engine. These low RPM’s actually puts much more stress on the engine parts. If this is a dirt bike, running on a track is best due to the up and down RPMs the engine will experience. Don’t be afraid to run it normally. If this is a road bike, a curvy road is best due to the RPMs going up and down, this is a must! Don’t lug the engine and don’t go on an open highway that keeps the engine at a sustained RPM. This first initial ride will only be about 5 minutes. Let the engine cool till you can touch the engine. Follow the same procedure as above, but this time running for 10 minutes. This will be your last break-in run. Follow the above procedure and run for 15 minutes. Now is the time to let the engine totally cool down again. Check the fluids as you did before after the engine has completely cooled down, and do another spark plug reading. It is now time to do another check of the cylinder head nuts for proper torque. Sometimes no additional tightening is needed, but don’t be alarmed if you need to, because this is normal Check all your fluids once more after the engine cools, inclduing coolant and oil level. At this time, the rings and piston should be broken in. Go out and ride it. The first few times, just be sure not to get the engine overheated, but your ride times are not restricted. It never hurts to do another spark plug reading and double-check the head nuts after your first long ride. Enjoy your rides, and be safe!
  5. 0 comments

    Plenty of power. Outdated suspension that feels uneasy and wild. Not confidence inspiring.
  6. 0 comments

    Its a great bike. But I decided to do a full restore. Ill have it finished in a couple weeks!
  7. 0 comments

    Bought an old race quad and redid it. Ended up buying new plastics, so there are pics with it yellow, some red, and all red.
  8. 0 comments

    I love this bike,I purchased it in 2008,It was a basket case motor was blown.I have been building bike motors for over 27 years.So I went to work,Punched it out to 101mm used wiseco 11:1 high compression piston,Installed a Stage 2 Hot cam for a XR650,It took some time to figure out how to pull it off,I added new FMF exhaust system for XR650L.It starts on 2 or 3 kick.I had to rejet the carbs,I am running 137.5 main jet.With the power it is making I went with Barnnet Dirt digger clutch.I cant say any thing bad about.I ride it on the trails and the street.I didn't get the bike finished until this spring.So I have only put 1200 miles on it.
  9. 0 comments

    2004 Yamaha YZ 450f - New Wiseco Top End kit installed with factory comp. piston, Renthal Twinwalls, ZipTy Racing Racing Coolant, R&D Powerbowl 1, Carb O-Ring Mod, PG Racing Graphics Wanted to add 2006-2009 Yamaha YZ 450f SSS Front fork tubes and matching rear suspension
  10. 0 comments

    Love it, it gave me some problems before the rebuild but now it's better than ever. Big bore gives it crazy bottom end and the cam makes up for that loss off the top. Awesome bike all around.
  11. 0 comments

    Its a 10 year old motocross bike, with very low hours. Perfect for an Enduro conversion. This bike astounds me. One day I'm riding MX on a track, the next I'm riding in the desert on single track. Its unstoppable, and just so easy and forgiving. I love this bike.
  12. 0 comments

    I love it,I'm try in to build it as far as I can in performance, I'm using Kimble white valve guides and valves I have an aftermarket Norris 340 cam,cobra header n pipe, I'm trying to find the rare 2 plug TC head for 200x , I want to use vintage 80s performance parts , good used,NOS,and I'm gonna combined new ignition tech........I'll add more with process I just strip her back down to paint I'm gonna take pics from how it sits to a finished minster, YES Nitrous is on the list or a turbo charger........I'll update with painting frame etc etc
  13. 0 comments

    Still one of my favorites, hence why I still have it.
  14. 0 comments

    I love it. I can beat 250f's all day with it. These bikes are awesome stock but when you mod them they are even more fun!don't listen to anyone who says a 125 can't beat a 250f. They can! I raced open C on my 125 against 14 250fs and i got 5th over all these 125s haul ass!
  15. 0 comments

    Great bike, has 77mm 277cc kit in it.
  16. Attention lovers of CRF250Rs! And anyone who appreciates awesome race bikes, for that matter. We have a new bike feature on Jett Lawrence's AMSOIL Honda CRF250R race bike up on our blog, for those that may want to check it out! https://blog.wiseco.com/jett-lawrences-amsoil-honda-crf250r-race-bike-breakdown
  17. I have a 96 KDX 200. Had new topend, and reeds put in about 10 hours ago. I took is down the road really easy 1 time and ran perfect. Coming back I got on it a little but never full throttle in about 4th gear. All of the sudden I heard a real loud knocking noise. I let it sit there and try to idle but then it just quite. I tried kicking it but it was really rough. I pulled the spark plug out and kicked it about 20 times and all seemed normal. Put the plug back in and it was still really rough. It will try to crank but then quite all of the sudden. So I took it apart and replaced crank and all bottom end bearings also the wristpin bearing. Still doing the same thing. Im tired of chasing the problem and need to get to the bottom of this. Any help would be appreciated!
  18. 0 comments

    Replaced everything bolt on imaginable. All Bearings, fork seals, Clutch Plates, rekluse clutch, master cylinders, brake pads, filters, levers, pegs, pedals, pro taper bars and grips, acerbis wrap around hand guards, warp9 rear wheel, desert tank, kickstand, and brand new FMF turbine powercore 2 silencer with fatty pipe. Rebuilt the top end at 126 hours, and 2 hours into the first ride the engine seized. Does not run, needs bottom end rebuild and most likely top end due to shrapnel. Once rebuilt the bike is fully restored. Bought for 1,600 and put at least 1,800 into it.
  19. 0 comments

    Street legal 280cc mod Exhaust welds ground down Airbox mods Trail tech 8" caged halogen headlight Trail tech display unit Trail tech regulator/rectifier R/C car battery ( hey, it works well) Rewound H/O stator Chinese turn signals Custom wire harness IMS 4 gallon tank Powercore 4 exhaust Aluminum skid plate 13/44 final gearing -Upcoming: Mikuni pumper carb Rear rack Tubliss system 12v power outlet
  20. 0 comments

    2000 Kawasaki KDX220R FMF Gnarly desert pipe FMF Turbinecore2 silencer RB Desings head mod RB Designs modified carb Wiseco piston KX500 forks Bark busters and skid plate
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