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Found 5 results

  1. Follow along for a great three day ride! I often receive the privilege to ride with people from all the corners of the globe. While living in Peru, one thing I notice is that very few Peruvians have ever ridden in the areas around Cusco where I live and ride. So when I get a chance to show some locals(Peruvians) some of the secrets of their country, I try to do it well. This is what its like to ride in the Andes of Peru...Check it out! I met up with the boys in the Sacred Valley on the first day. They told me that they wanted to make another attempt at the trail that we rode two years prior, but never even came close to finishing. It really doesn't matter where you are from, if you are a dirt biker and there is an unknown or impossible trail in front of you, you want to give it a shot...Maybe not everyone is like that, but most that I run with are. The First Day-The impossible trail These guys have seen and heard the stories of countless attempts to reach the end of this particular trail. I took a group of some of the best riders from Lima and they fell quite short from the end. I think somewhere in my language, I may have fostered a bit of competition between the guys from Lima and the guys from Arequipa. Sebastian kept asking me if the guys from Lima made it this far. Regardless, I am the only one that has reached the other end of the trail on a dirt bike and neither group has come close. I do look forward to the day when I can cross over and down the other side with another rider or two. Not sure when that will be, but hopefully soon. We started up the trail like a herd of deer. The route is super fun with every type of obstacle one could imagine, while taking breaks when someone got hung up. That means it was quite often. The trail was dry at first, then the rain came and put a little bit of extra difficulty in the path. Regardless, we all pounded through hundreds of obstacles in the first couple of hours. The trail is relatively short in distance, but time is another measure. The entire trail to the other end is 18 km or about 13 miles. My guess is that we completed about half before throwing in the towel. The constant struggle to keep your wheels on the ground and your sanity intact is not easy. Regardless, the day was a huge success. Smiles all around. Nobody with broken bones, only a few bike issues that we managed to deal with on the trail, and a bunch of sore fellas for the next day of riding. Day one...SUCCESS! Just getting started... Day two was also a trail that would challenge each of us. It was a trail that I have done a number of times, but this time was different. We went the reverse direction. I was sure it would make it more difficult, but how much? As we started up toward the couple of alpine lakes, we found ourselves exerting a lot more energy than we expected. The toll from the previous day may have had something to do with it. Day two was a loop, so the plan was to reach a certain point of no return and keep on going till we reached the place where we started. The weather was cooperative, the trail was formidable, and the good times were had by all. Little by little we made our way over and down to the valley, then up and over another to reach our destination. Check out the videos to see what it was like. Be careful, you might want to come down and join me for a ride after seeing the video...Here is my contact info- scott@motomissionperu.com. The final day on the Cresta overlooking Cusco With all that said, we finished the day, absolutely smoked. With one more day of riding to go, we made the plan to meet up for the final day. The guys wanted to ride a bit closer to the city of Cusco. I took them to one of my honey holes. The "CRESTA" I call it. The longest ridge ride that one can imagine. Its filled with nearly impossible hill climbs, drop offs, fast rhythmic sections, and views that are mostly missed due to concentrating on the trail in front of your tire. Another perfect day of riding. Finished off with a plate of local cuisine in the small Peruvian town of Ccorrau and said goodbye to my buds. I can't wait until they come back so we can give it another go on that impossible trail. Make sure to follow the blog to stay tuned for the next ride. Also, for more info about Motomission Peru and riding dirt bikes in the Andes of South America, check out our website at www.motomissionperu.com. Also feel free to reach me through TT at Scottiedawg. Stay tuned for the next one! Scottiedawg
  2. Auguste88

    DRZ 400 Rally

    Hi everyone, I am curently building my bike for light adventure riding. I am making a contraption that I would like to call a rally fairing. I am showing you what I have made so far. For the build; - oversize GPI racing radiators - oversize gaz tank - fuel pump - swapping the speedometer by a vapor - custom made bracket for fairing - fiberglass fairing/windsheild I have not adressed the wide ratio issue since I just completely rebuild the engine last winter. I got a 39 teeth sproket for highway speed. I have no experience whatsoever with fiberglass, any input would be apreciated. Thanks for the interest.
  3. I'm currently looking at moving with work to Andalucia in Spain, just across the water from Morocco and am looking at building a new DRZ-400 into a Rally bike to take with me. I looked at getting a KTM or Husky or other 450cc, but the maintenance would be a killer, so my intent would be to build a DRZ-400 engine under 450cc which can put out a reliable 50+HP. The only must have's on this beast would be kickstart, a capacity smaller than 450cc to stay in the lightweight class and ability to work in hot n high environments. I'm guessing I'd build it using a set of wide gears? I get that the DR Rally bike will be heavier and I'll have to change a lot of the components like brakes and suspension to make it onto the same playing field as a KTM 450 EXC, but the key for me, is having a bike which means I can actually focus on the riding during a 4/5 day event and self deploy to the event, meaning I can start racking up experience. As well as Morrocan based rallies, I'd be looking at competing in the Rally Albania and Greek rallies and maybe getting off-road in the Sierra Nevada's. Thumper Hive Mind, hit me with your opinions and suggestions on how to achieve this goal.
  4. Good day. I've come across this image of a Honda CRF450 Rally engine. What draws my attention is the piece of equipment next to the crank case guard. What is it exactly? Is it used like a chain lubing system? Why would it need to be planted in the direct vicinity of the front sprocket otherwise?
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