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Found 36 results

  1. hey guys, I have been looking for a suitable 150cc sized bike that is cheap. I would like to avoid the CRF 150 don't ask why. I am looking at ktm's but are very expensive so please give me some suggestions
  2. Blake Zimmerman

    Help Maybe?

    Hey. I just got a 94rmx with a complete rm makeover, but I don't have the tools to fix it yet so I've not ridden yet. I was wondering if anyone has tips about riding. And if anyone has some spare tool they could give a beginner. I'm pretty poor so could be some time till I get them myself. The pics my beaut
  3. I have a Honda crf50f and its been sitting for 6 years. I just got a new carburetor and it's now running, only 1 problem. It wont idle when the choke is on or up position, it will only idle if choke is in the down or off position. Any help on what it could be? Thanks.
  4. kylercrf450r

    2008 Crf 450r bearing out?

    Hey! My name is Kyler. So recently my bike overheated like 3 times, then finally one day it quit on me. After draining the oil, it turns out there's shredded metal everywhere. So I tore it all down. Now I'm not sure whats the problem. So far all that I found is the little rectangular reed valve was missing 1 out of 2 screws, and around that area down there is where I found the most of the shredded metal. also, I'm not sure if its a problem but the actual shaft on the crank has the slightest bit of play. Mainly I just don't know what to replace so please help! I don't want to put it all back together and not replace the main prob. Thanks in advance!
  5. Paul Olesen

    How The Two-Stroke Exhaust System Works

    In my last post, I shared details about how the two-stroke cylinder works, in today's post I want to provide an overview of how a performance two-stroke engine's exhaust system works. Adding a performance exhaust system can be a great way to increase power and/or alter the power delivery of an engine. I would also argue that optimizing a two-stroke engine’s exhaust system is equally as important as ensuring the cylinder’s ports are correctly designed for the given application. Not all exhaust systems are designed to do the same things, and much like cylinder port design, exhaust designs are intended to alter power in specific ways. Having a basic understanding of how an exhaust system works can go a long way when it comes to selecting the right exhaust pipe for your engine. Two-stroke exhaust design is complicated and there are many different variables that must be considered when designing a pipe. I don’t intend to go into all of them, but I will share a few of the most critical. Each time the exhaust port opens to release spent combustion gases, pressure pulses are created. Modern pipe designs harness this pulse energy and use it to help scavenge and fill the cylinder. The process starts when a positive pressure pulse is created once the exhaust port opens and combustion gases leave the cylinder. The positive pulse travels down the pipe until it reaches the diffuser, at which point part of the pulse is inverted and reflected back towards the cylinder as a negative wave. This negative wave is very beneficial in pulling spent exhaust gases out of the cylinder and fresh mixture up through the transfer ports. The remaining positive pulse continues on its journey towards the end of the pipe where it encounters the reflector. The reflector acts as the name implies and forces the positive pulse back towards the exhaust port. Once reflected back, the pulse remains positive and, if the pipe is designed correctly, will reach the exhaust port just as the piston is about to close off the port on the compression stroke at the desired RPM for maximum power. Any fresh mixture which has escaped out the cylinder will be forced back in by the positive pressure pulse. The tuned length of the pipe is dictated by the exhaust port timing, RPM of max power, and the speed of sound. Pulse length and amplitude are governed by the angles of the diffuser and reflector. Generally, steeper cone angles create pulses with more amplitude but shorter duration. Shallower angles generate pulses with less amplitude but longer duration. Given these variables, it is easy to see how a pipe could be tailored for specific applications. An engine converted for road racing may utilize a pipe designed for peak power which incorporates steep diffuser and reflector cone angles so that pulse amplitude is not sacrificed. This peak power would likely come at the expense of a narrowed range of power. An engine tailored for woods riding may feature a pipe with shallower cone angles, resulting in less pulse amplitude, but a broader spread of power. The last parameter I want to touch on is how the tailpipe, which is sometimes referred to as the stinger, influences the pipe. The tailpipe creates a flow restriction in the pipe which allows the pipe to have a certain amount of back pressure. Enlarge the tailpipe and the back pressure decreases, make it smaller and the back pressure increases. As back pressure increases or decreases, so does temperature and ultimately the speed of sound. As the speed of sound changes, so does the resonance RPM of the pipe. If the tailpipe is sized too small, cylinder scavenging will be inhibited. When this happens, the cylinder, fresh mixture, and piston will all be overheated. While engineers and tuners can estimate starting pipe dimensions and tuned lengths, a great deal of trial and error testing is usually still necessary to fine tune the exhaust pipe and optimize the design. Unless you intend on building your own exhausts, this work will have already been done for you. When selecting an exhaust system, you need to focus on how the exhaust alters the power curve. Exhaust systems are tailored to deliver more bottom end performance, top-end performance, or performance throughout the power curve. Selecting which system is right for you will depend on how you want your engine to perform. If you’ve chosen to modify your cylinder ports, installing an exhaust system that compliments the porting can be very beneficial. You might be wondering about slip-on mufflers. If you’ve followed along with my explanation of how exhaust pipes work, you’ll notice I made no mention of the muffler. While the muffler can have a small effect on performance, it is not the primary factor. Upgrading a muffler is a good way to reduce weight, but there won’t be a slip-on out there which significantly increases power, in the same way, a properly designed expansion chamber can. I hope you enjoyed this write-up on key features affecting the performance of two-stroke cylinders. As for Two Stroke Handbook news, we received our first printed proof of the book this week! Needless to say, we are inching closer and closer to an official release date. To stay updated on The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook we created an email sign up for our readers. Click this link to sign up, see the new cover, the Table of Contents, and some sneak peek pages right from the book. Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week! -Paul
  6. Paul Olesen

    Three Easy Ways to Improve Engine Cooling

    This month I want to discuss three easy ways to improve engine cooling for your dirt bike or ATV and explain why they are effective. As improvements are made to an engine that increase its power, the amount of heat the engine will create will also increase. Effectively removing heat from the engine and cooling it is very important as the power output of the engine goes up. The cooler an engine runs, the more power it can produce. There are three ways that the aftermarket attempts to improve the cooling system of a particular engine. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system. Let's dive in. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system The flow through the cooling system can be increased by installing a water pump impeller designed to increase the flow rate of the coolant. The reason increasing the flow rate of coolant works is because the rate of heat transfer from the engine to the cooling system is directly proportional to the mass flow rate of coolant. This is thermodynamics jargon, but there are two key parts to consider. First, how much coolant is flowing, and second, at what speed the coolant is flowing. The more coolant that flows and the faster it flows will reduce the temperature difference between the point where the coolant enters into the engine and where it exits. This next part is not quite as intuitive. When the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet is reduced, the average coolant temperature is lowered. When the average coolant temperature is lowered the engine will run cooler. This is why fitting a water pump, which increases the flow of coolant through the engine, improves cooling. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators Radiators consist of a series of tubes and fins which run from the top to the bottom of the radiator. These are often referred to as the radiator’s cores. As coolant enters the radiator it moves through the series of tubes and heat is transferred from the coolant to the fins. Air passes over the fins and heat is transferred from the fins to the air. This transfer of heat from coolant to air is how radiators reduce the temperature of the coolant. Coolant temperatures can be reduced by upgrading radiators in three ways, by increasing the frontal area of the radiators, by making the radiators thicker, or by using materials with better heat transfer properties for the cores. For all practical purposes, increasing the radiators’ frontal area and improving the core materials is rarely a viable option for dirt bike applications. This is because there is little room for the radiators to begin with and they are susceptible to damage, making the use of expensive core materials a risky affair. Unfortunately, both of these options are better improvements to make before resorting to increasing the thickness of the radiators. Increasing the thickness of a radiator is not as efficient of an improvement as increasing the frontal area of the radiator. In order for thicker radiators to cool more effectively than their stock counterparts, airflow past the radiators is key. When the thickness of a radiator is increased, air must travel a greater distance through the radiator before exiting. The speed the air is traveling plays a big role in determining how quickly the air heats up as it moves through the radiator. If the air is not traveling fast enough through the radiator, the air temperature will rise and equal the coolant temperature before reaching the end of the radiator. Once this happens, heat transfer stops and whatever portion of the radiator remains will not help with cooling. In order for a thicker radiator to be effective, air must flow quickly enough through it so that the exiting air temperature is at, or better yet, below the coolant temperature. In conclusion, benefits from adding thicker radiators will be more prominent in applications where speeds are relatively high. Whereas in applications where the bike is hardly moving, improved cooling may not be noticeable. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system The last alteration to the cooling system that can be made is to install a high pressure radiator cap. As coolant temperature increases, pressure increases inside the cooling system. The radiator cap is designed to be the pressure release point in the cooling system in the event that too much pressure builds up. This can occur as a result of overheating or a blown head gasket for example. By designing the radiator cap to be the weak link in the system, other parts of the system, such as seals, don’t end up getting damaged from being over pressurized. The radiator cap features a plug and spring on its underside. The spring is designed to compress once a certain pressure is reached, at which point the plug will move upwards and uncover a pressure release hole where excess pressure will be vented. The coolant’s boiling point and ability to conduct heat are necessary factors in understanding why a high pressure radiator cap can help improve engine cooling. Water alone boils at 212°F (100°C) while a 50/50 mix of water and antifreeze boils at 223°F (106.1C). Radiator cap pressure designations are usually advertised in bar, with most stock radiator caps designed to withstand pressures up to 1.1 bar (16psi). The more pressure a fluid is under, the more difficult it becomes for the fluid to vaporize, and the higher its boiling point becomes. When water is under 1.1 bar of pressure, the temperature water will boil at is 260°F (127°C) while a 50/50 antifreeze mix will boil at 271°F (133°C). By installing a radiator cap designed to withstand higher pressures, an additional increase in the coolant’s boiling point will be seen. High pressure caps are usually designed to withstand 1.3 bar (19psi) of pressure. This 0.2 bar (3psi) increase in pressure over the stock system will increase the boiling point of water or antifreeze by 8.7°F (4.83°C). This will then bring the boiling point of pure water or a 50/50 antifreeze mix to approximately 269°F (132°C) and 280°F (138°C) respectively. While this small temperature increase alone won’t do a lot for your engine, coupling a high pressure cap and using coolants with better heat transfer properties can do wonders. Antifreeze (ethylene glycol) alone is not an inherently good conductor of heat. In fact, pure antifreeze conducts heat about half as well as water, while a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water conducts heat approximately three quarters as efficiently as pure water. This means a cooling system using a 50/50 mix of antifreeze would have to flow faster than a cooling system filled with pure distilled water in order to achieve the same cooling efficiency. What this means for you is significant cooling gains can be made by using distilled water and an additive called “Water Wetter” in place of an antifreeze-water mix. Water Wetter is an additive that improves water’s “wetting” abilities (another whole subject), adds corrosion resistance, and slightly increases the boiling point of water. A high pressure radiator cap in conjunction with distilled water and Water Wetter as the coolant is by far the best route to go for high performance applications where freezing is not an issue. For applications which must still be resistant to freezing, the antifreeze-water ratio can be altered in favor of mixtures incorporating more water than antifreeze so that the cooling efficiency of the mixture is improved. Just bear in mind the freezing point of the mixture as it is thinned with water will be reduced, so you will need to pay close attention to the environment you are operating in so that the coolant is never susceptible to freezing. A frozen coolant system can ruin an engine and makes for a very bad day! I hope you enjoyed this post on three easy ways to improve your engine’s cooling. One more thing before I wrap up! April is Autism Awareness month, and here at DIY Moto Fix we couldn't be more excited to announce that we will be donating 15% of all profits made in April to AutismMX. If you haven't heard of AutismMX, this amazing non-profit brings Autism awareness to the motorcross community. Founder, Matthew Dalton, created this non-profit after finding that motorcross was an amazing way to connect with his autistic son. At DIY Moto Fix this non-profit also touches a chord with us. Our filmmaker and photographer, Kelsey Jorissen, loved dirt biking with her autistic brother throughout their childhood. The Autism MX Project focuses on four areas: Autism MX Day Camps are days for ASD kids and families to have the chance to ride AMX’s little dirt bikes and quads and enjoy the sport of motocross. Team Autism MX Sponsoring amateur MX racers, riders as well as sponsoring AMA pro racers. Through doing so, they are getting out the word on Autism Awareness to millions. AMX Puzzle Piece Apparel from shirts, graphics, goggles, to help stand out and support Autism Awareness. AMX Ride Days for Autism Awareness AMX celebrates Autism Awareness and is a fundraiser for The Autism MX Project. So for the entire month of April - if you buy a book, a video, even a poster - 15% of that purchase will go towards AutismMX and their amazing cause. Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week!
  7. let me know wanna ge a good trail bike
  8. desertdaves

    Kids on 50CC's

  9. rkmoss

    My 01 CR-125 Build

    Whats up ThumperTalk, so for the past year I've had this bit of a project bike that I've been working on, its an 01 CR-125 as you can tell by the title. My original plan was to build it for more of a motocross scene, and in January I broke my CB, I cased a double and it threw me over the bars. After that I've decided to move towards more of an enduro scene, I had just got the CR before I broke my collarbone, and I didn't want to sell for a 250 4T or 250 2T, so working with what I had... I began this build. I didn't take many pictures along the way due to it being spread throughout the year, but recently I finally splurged and bought the last bit of stuff I wanted for the bike minus a 3.1 gal tank, that can wait. When I first got the bike she was making pretty low compression, and I could work on my bike all day, but troubleshooting is not my strong area, so I send her into the local K&N Yamaha, man those guys know what they are doing, I've never been disappointed in any of their work. Turned out the piston was shot, the cylinder is a little worn, and the power valve linkage wasn't even hooked up! So they threw a new piston in there, and now it's making about 140psi, still 40psi under but it still rips, at some point before this upcoming race season I will throw a new cylinder in there, but I got the motor running good, and I started to work towards making it more woods ready (Pipe Guard, Hand Guards, Moose Torque Spacer, Skid Plate (not made yet), etc.) Spent 6 hours in the shop a couple days ago getting her cleaned up, running the swingarm and frame with scotch brite and mothers polish, and here is my final product! What are your opinions on it? anything else you'd recommend for a 125 woods bike? And by the way, I'm sure I'm gonna hear "A 125 in the woods?", "just buy a 250", "you won't have enough bottom end", etc. But after riding a yz250, a ktm 200exc, and a cr250f through the woods, I wouldn't trade my bike for anything like that, it is so much lighter, and although I have to work the hell out of the clutch, I feel like I have a lot more control over logs, rocks, etc. I also feel like its easier to throw the 125 around more than the other bikes. '
  10. katiestocks

    2000 TTR125 gas tank cracked BAAAAD!

    Wondering if anyone knows if a WR250 2003-2006 gas tank would fit on my little 2000 ttr125... I found one on craigslist for over half the price of a new one! https://vancouver.craigslist.ca/rds/mpo/d/yamaha-wr-wr-acerbis/6162155245.html i'm crossing my fingers but kind of doubt it'll fit I've already tried to JB weld it.. that didnt work so i tried rapid fix and it worked for a week or so but i think because the cracks are so big and maybe the tank flexed a bit that it soon started leaking again.. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated
  11. RideRed600

    2 stroke seized

    i just did a full top end rebuild, all new, had it running to idle , was idling for 10-15mins warm up then rode it for 30mins to break in put it away and came back next morning and it was seized up, im thinkin cold seize because of the weather and my storage not being heated. let me know more info if u guys know anythin thanks
  12. With warmer weather and the riding season around the corner for many of us, I wanted to cover a topic that can either make or break an event. Whether you’re competing in a racing series or traveling to the track or trail, let's talk about event preparedness. More specifically, what spare parts should you keep on hand? Plus, what methods do you use to keep your spares organized? Honestly, I struggled with organization until I started working on this post. I had no method to my madness. Every time an event came up I’d do the same thing; throw a bunch of stuff in a box or the back of my van and head to the event. The sad part is I now realize this was a weakness of mine for quite some time, but didn’t do anything about it! Maybe you can relate? I finally said enough is enough. I don’t throw my tools in a cardboard box when I go to a race, leaving what I bring to the fate of my memory. So why would I do that with the spare parts I bring? I started solving this problem by compiling a spreadsheet detailing what spare parts I keep on hand for ice racing and hare scrambles. I realize that each discipline will differ and may have niche parts that should be kept. The goal here is not to definitively define what spares one should keep on hand, but to have a conversation and provide a resource that can be used to help people get set up based on their own needs. Once I took inventory of everything I felt I wanted to bring to a race, I went to Menards and went hunting for the perfect organized storage bin/toolbox. Here’s what I ended up with: Naturally, once I returned with the toolbox, my list grew and I probably need to go back for a bigger one. I intend to store a copy of the spreadsheet in the tote so I can keep tabs on inventory and know exactly what I have available. Should I get another bike, this system is easily replicable and my plan is to get another organized toolbox that goes with it. This system is how I went from being an unorganized “throw it in the van at the last minute” rider to a more relaxed well prepared rider. I’d love to hear how you handle event readiness, what you bring, and how you keep track of it. My hope is that by sharing our strategies we’ll save someone the misfortune of having a bad day at the track or trail. Perhaps I'll even end up with more things I need to add to my list. -Paul If enjoyed this post be sure to follow my blog and sign up for my newsletter! DIY Moto Fix Newsletter
  13. whats the best bike cleaner ??out there
  14. This is a question for all the hunters here. Do you ride in the woods you hunt in? Like especially the trails near where you have your stands setup by? How likely is it the deer will leave my woods if I'm in them all summer braapin it up? Thanks.
  15. Hello Ive recently been looking to buy a new bike and have had a hard time picking between a 250f and a 450. Im pretty close to an intermediate rider. Im 5’11 and 250lbs. Ive been going to the gym nearly everyday Mon-Fry and am hoping to loose 50lb. Im not very brand specific but im looking to do trail riding and motocross. Any advice on what bike would be best for me? thanks.
  16. Motor madness

    Programmer for 13 kx250f

    I'm looking for a programmer for 2013 kx250f Kawasaki. To adjust the fuel, electrical and to check for problems with the bikes? Don't know if there's one out there for this diagnostic testing but would like to buy one. I have purchased them before for jet skis. Thanks Everyone
  17. Spring break had great weather so we changed plans, putting away the skis and loading the dirt bikes. Searching for areas that were clear of snow led me south and I ended up striking out for Moab. It was an experiment in taking the entire family. The kids are 5, 8, and 9 and they do well on dirt but I knew the sand would be a challenge and didn't know how it would play out on the rock. Anyhow, we had a great time and it was a complete success. But when I searched online I could not find any info about experiences with kids around Moab and never see kids riding there so I thought I would share. We rode: 3D Jeep Trail to Bartlett Wash loop, Flat Iron Mesa loop, 7 Mile Rim, Monitor and Merrimac, and Wipe Out Hill loop, Slick rock, Hell's Revenge, Fins n Things, and maybe a bit more. Bikes are as follows: 5 yr old on a TTR50, 8 yr old on a CRF70, and 9 yr old on a CRF80 As I expected, sand was a great challenge on the little wheels. The kids quickly figured out the slick rock and managed to avoid any bad falls. My 5 year old has logged a lot of miles in front of me and we would park her bike whenever she wasn't having fun and pop her on mine. The first day I was trying to find out if this experiment had any legitimacy at all, and it was promising aside from some of the long soft sand in Bartlett. My wife took a fall and hurt her ribs on Flat Iron Mesa, so the kids and I rode the rest alone. We had a blast, except one long loose hill climb and then immediate descent, which was very hard with the little bikes (you can dodge it if you are paying attention). They gained a lot of confidence on some of the rock ledges at Flit Iron. 7 Mile is always a great time, as was M&M. My 5 year old got to ride a few miles of this loop until the sand was bad. The sand sections are simply a drag for them, but by then I heard few complaints as they were getting better at handling the sand and were having fun. Slickrock was more stressful, as I let my 5 yr old try the Practice Loop. She did great and was very upset that I would not let her ride the rest of the trail: "Did I do good enough to ride the whole trail?" She ended up doing 3 laps on Practice Loop. Tears were brief as I parked the bike. My older kids did really well on the main trail with me spotting in a couple of locations. I missed the cut-off into Fins n Things and we rode the whole trail, which put is in some deep, dry sand sections. The rock sections were great. We rode Hell's Revenge last. I needed to see how they were riding first due to the exposure on that trail. I was nervous but they were not. They had another great time on Hells and had plenty of confidence by then. All in all, the riding went better than I could have hoped. The kids did managed to learn how to ride the new terrain types and ended up riding everything I threw at them. If I was giving advice to someone thinking of trying this I would work harder to avoid the deep sand, especially in the beginning. I would insist that you had ridden and knew the trails pretty well in advance. Protective gear is important on rock--knee guards can turn a small tip-over into a laugh instead of a big bruise. One risk I was concerned with was a simple fall scaring one of my little riders and creating a mental block. There are also easier and harder trails but we all know our kids best and know what they are capable of. These are not special kid trails--they are just what I deemed appropriate for the day and the kid. And our day off was a big hit. The kids loved the petroglyphs and dinosaur tracks along Potash Rd. The new museum at 313 was a bit of a flop for us, but the rock shop was a great spot to visit. I hope this helps someone plan their trip. I posted a couple of videos:
  18. gappman

    Jones Creek Opener

    Jones Creek in Washington was where I first started riding in 1976. Today, its got a strong contingent of followers and an organization that does a great job of keeping the trail system alive and thriving. Recently, two more trail sections were added and there is more to come. I took some time and put this promo piece together for the organization. I hope you are able to take some time, watch the video, and come out to Jones Creek and ride. Your involvement is what helps keep these areas open!!! Enjoy!
  19. yz125rider447

    War Stories

    I wanted to start a thread were we could talk about all the great memories we've had over the years. I have some memories that truly complete me when I look back, I bet we all do. It'd be cool if we could share some. Funny, painful, stupid, badass, whatever, it belongs here. I have so many I don't know where to start, so I'll start at the beginning. I remember the first time I ever took my new to me RM85 to the track. I was 14. Sandbox MX in Michigan if your from these parts. I practiced on the kids track for like 20 minutes and looked out at the big track and was mesmorized. All those big guys and big bikes ripping that huge intimidating track. I went for it, and my life was never the same. It was so hard but at the same time it was the most fun I'd ever had. A euphoria i had never felt. It was so profound, I was instantly in love. It was better than drugs or sex. The ruts were so intimidating, haha. I remember my face pasted to the window staring at the track as we drove away like "Oh my god that was the best thing EVER!" For months I couldnt wait to go back. That was fall, and the winter between then and the next time I rode was like torture. I would stay up til 2 AM everynight watching YZ125 gopro videos hahaha. We used to ride these powerlines behind one of my best friends house. We ripped the matted weeds down into perfect loamy black dirt, into a whooped out, rutted out oval. It was the perfect practice track. Everyday I would come home from school when I was 16, get on my YZ125, and ride a mile down to my friends house and we would rip the "track" all night. this was the first place where riding actually "clicked" for me. I started to "get it". I remember feeling that feeling of letting it go wide open 6th gear and just thinking "whatever happens, happens" or "F it" and letting the bike work underneath me. Such an amazing feeling. Spent so much time back there, thats when I really started to improve. Eventually the power company rep came back and told me i couldnt ride there anymore (which of course I still did) and then eventually a cop came back and said he didnt care but if the power company tells us to stop again we have to stop. We still rode back there, but it eventually got too overgrown. I'll throw in a few little shits just to bother you guys who are real uptight too lmfao... One time we were camping and my buddy started a huge fire with VP110 and put his back tire in the fire and roosted the shit out of it and made a dirt bike flamethrower. Or the time when we were in the powerlines and my other friend killed a rabid possum raccoon with a huge stick, and I hung it from the powerlines (it was our mark). I remember a time me and one of my best friends were riding the trails and he shot a baseball sized rock off his back tire and i clearly saw it in the air, watched it as it hit my neck, and we kept on ripping the turns 5th gear. That was a good/bad feeling. Second time I took another friend to the track, he tried to hit this step up which he shouldnt have even thought about trying to hit. After you land there is an immediate 90 degree left hand turn. He over shot the step up, landed flying W no hands on the bars, and rode like this into the 90 degree berm which was like a jump face, except steeper. He literally ass seat bounced 20 feet in the air, over the fence behind the turn where there is a good 40 foot drop onto a road. Everyone at the track watched and looked at me and I just started running. I literally ran across the track and said screw the rules, I thought my friend broke his back or neck or something bad. Sprinted as hard as I could in MX boots over this fence (his bike flew threw the fence and made a huge hole which is still there) and I found him with just the wind knocked out of him. I was so relieved that he was alive and not paralyzed. The flaggers and people that saw it couldnt believe it. We all thought he was gonna be messed up. Just a very very sore back. Kinda reminds me of the first time I went to Baja Acres MX and got landed on by a 450. fun times
  20. shotgunscott

    GHORV RV Challenge Series

    Fall 3 race offroad series at GHORV that is suitable for all skill levels. We will offer a Long Course, Short Course and Kids Course all designed for the skill level. Round 1 starts next Sunday October 8th. Long course is a 7.2 mile loop, Short Course is 6.4 mile loop, Kids 9-12 is 1.5 mile, and 8 and under is .7 hope to see you there.
  21. Yam_Mechanic

    Ice Racing in Alberta

    Hey guys, Me and my team have built an Ice Racing Bike for the 2019 Numb Bum Ice Race. Due to the strange warm weather we've been having, and the lack of any info on the internet; does anyone know if the Ice Race is still on, or is there any other ice races in Alberta that we could attend so that we don't waste several thousand dollars in modifications.
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