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Found 22 results

  1. mattyvsmithy

    How tight should this bolt be?

    Hey guys, Quick question, can't find the answer anywhere in the Haynes or online. Is this linkage bolt meant to be done up flush or is it meant to have a bit of a gap? I failed my MOT due to this and it's a pain in the ass to even get my hand in there and tighten it at all! With some Vice Grips and a wrench on the other side I've made some progress but it's pretty damn tight, I can't see it coming off anytime soon or getting much tighter! If it is meant to be solidly tight, how the in the holy mother of whatever can you do it? Cheers!
  2. I just recently got a 2001 yamaha yz250f and it is pretty tall for me I am 5'4 and I cant hop on the bike without something to step on one legged I dropped my bike a good amount of times due to this problem. I know if i lower the springs it can affect the performance but I'm barley starting to ride dirt bikes so I am not riding very fast to notice. Is there any cheap way to lower it? no shop will do it for me.
  3. So I want to share a solution I discovered today for what seems to be a somewhat common issue. First a little background, I ride a 2007 YZ144 set up for the woods and I had recently started to develop some slack in the rear end, so I had a buddy help me look and sure enough it was moving in the linkage. So I just received my new bearings and went to press out all the old bearings today. Using all-thread, some thick washers, and some nuts I was able to press out all the bearings in the linkage reasonably quickly (once I figured out to use a smaller socket so I wasn't hitting the shoulder). But then I ran into a dead-end.. the connecting link, dog bone, wish bone etc. has a shoulder, or raised sleeve, between the two bearings preventing you from pushing them both out one side. Now from my understanding this isn't the case on every bike, some bikes don't have a shoulder and the bearings in the connecting link can both be pressed out one side but my service manual clearly showed a shoulder. After some searching nobody really had a great method for removing these bearings except for buying a blind bearing puller. So I bought a cheap blind bearing puller from Harbor Freight but this did not work for me, it was slightly too large. So back to the drawing board.. then I discovered this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YRA3nhzXX0 Essentially, these races can be hammered out from the opposite side using a concrete expansion anchor that cost $2.69 at my local Ace Hardware Store. The one I found and used was slightly different from the one shown in the above video but there are many different styles that would probably work. Mine was luckily just the right length where I didn't need to use all thread or anything. Just slide it through to the race on the opposite side and expand it once inside (remove the needles before hand by the way). Once I had it in there and expanded, a few solid hammer blows (with wood underneath) and it came right out. See below for pictures of how it works. I've seen the question asked on these forums several times with no solution other than "buy a blind bearing puller" so hopefully this helps some people out.
  4. Hello all, I recently picked up a 1978 Yamaha IT175 off of Craigslist that needed a ring. Instead of doing just the ring, I have ordered a new piston and ring and am going to replace both. I have never worked on a 2 stroke this old before and have never done a top end on any bike before, so I was wondering if anyone could put me in the direction of an instruction sheet for the top end on this bike as well as some tip and tricks for general stuff. Also, if anyone has first hand experience with a similar bike, that would be awesome! Thank you all in advance!
  5. March 2016 I bought my first motorbike A CRF50 May 2016 I moved to a 2.5acre block and started creating jumps for my level of riding I really tried to make the most of the natural features that were hidden beneath the grass/weeds but I really just ended up adding to a worm line that we constantly rode and added lip to sections that we saw fit. Straight / last corner First Jump Sandy burm Exit burm, minor woops into second jump Second Jump followed by small burm Small lip into into uneven decent into the last burm/beginning Perhaps this is a good start for a youngster on his/her first bike I failed to mention that I was born in 1995. This track was fun to start with but it was not long until this simply wasn't enough I started to build this line which opposed the direction of the original track. But the idea was to jump this, hit the small burm and then go onto hit a big jump.. But I got distracted by what I accidentally created. A little dodgy I know, this is the creation of when you can no longer be bothered digging and use random items to fill the gaps. Imagining is a great thing to do and to visualize is even better ! I took photos of my jumps and drawn on them with my smart phone. Little did I know this was going to be the most crashed jump of my life (so far) This was the beginning of my laziest effort. Pallet down ramp. These are pretty great if done well. -Level the area for stable stacking of pallets -Use pallets to fill most of desired down ramp space. -Then put any type of thick wood on top (helps spread the load and not crack pallets) -Then carpet so soil doesn't fall through the cracks -Last add soil/clay and lots of it ! I learnt the hard way (not the greatest effort on the jump but it puts the size in perspective a little) This jump quickly became our favourite And the little track quickly got forgotten and over grown. My lust for a bigger and greater jump and had clouded my mind... And with bigger jumps you soon require a bigger bike and this is when I upgraded to the KLX110L 2016 My stupidness resulted in this creation It stood at about 6ft And shook in the breeze After the result of poor pallet down ramp I realised making these sketchy jumps is dangerous and requires a lot of maintenance. So I contacted a lot of earth moving companies. And tried finding companies that were working on clay sites. This was free for me and should be for you. Each load of dirt 15-20t costs roughly $450 to dump in some parts of Australia. So I offered free dumping within my yard, I get dirt for jumps and they save a lot of money, win win. My first load arrived, roughly 17t of dirt.... it sounds like a lot but it really is not. I got these big crate boxes from work and screwed a door across the top of them to help spread the load. The crates are only there to try and save anybody that is lacking the correct speed. Progress was slow, but I needed to move this first load up against the crates as much as possible to allow the track to back in closer to the pallets. When I cant be bothered digging or don't have the dirt. I like to visualize what it will be like in the end Finally destroyed the old ramp and created a new one with the most desired material. That's what 4 days afterwork of my digging looks like (4 hours a night), worth the giant blisters This is about 22-26ft jump which is a good/fun size I believe. This is currently where I am at but I do think my plans are pretty great This is the plan for the future Apologies for not numbering the above photo The yellow jump with the 16 beside it is my pallet jump which is jump #1 And the second large jump of 21ft is the orange one that follows and that is jump #2 From now I ask that you use your imagination and hopefully can figure out which ones are which in regards to the following images. This one is Jump # 3 Note the burm will not swing around the tree and go to the left. This will be a bit of a hip and send you into a right hand turn quickly followed by a left as shown on the birds eye view. #4 is going to be a pretty hectic step down that I am already scared of the idea ! #5 is going to be a 25ft hip #6 is going to be roughly a 20ft triple (rollable) #7 will be a 17-18ft tabletop #8 and #9 need to swap as I think double-table-double would flow a lot nicer rhythm wise.... #11 a good sized triple roughly 18ft Into a hopefully very vertical burm Then into a +20ft hip to finish it off through the trees Hope you've enjoyed this read so far. I will keep you updated with the progression of the rest of the track. Please feel free to give me tips (other than spelling) in regards to the track and ideas. Cheers Jackson
  6. Paul Olesen

    Maintenance Readiness

    I hope you all have been out riding and enjoying spring. I got back into the hare scramble racing scene over the weekend after a three year hiatus and had a blast. Today, I just want to share a quick tip and start a discussion on preparatory things that help shorten the time it takes to do complex maintenance tasks, such as rebuilding an engine. Quick Tip Prior to turning a wrench carefully look over the service manual scanning through all the applicable procedures and subsystems. If I’m working on an unfamiliar model, I find it is helpful to jot down a rough outline of the disassembly sequence. This saves me time in the long run as I don’t have to rely as heavily on the service manual or continually flip through various sections. Another option is to use post-it notes to bookmark each relevant section in the manual. Mark the post-it notes with numbers or headings so you know where to turn to next. Earmarking or bookmarking the torque tables is also a huge time saver no matter the task. Be sure to scan through the manual as well to identify any specialty tools that are required that you may not have. Discussion Points What other preparatory things can be done to help speed up the major maintenance process? Is there a method to your madness or do you dive right in? Thanks for reading! Paul https://www.diymotofix.com/
  7. Paul Olesen

    New and Re-plated Cylinder Prep

    Today I want to share some pointers on preparing new or re-plated cylinders that will help ensure your engines run stronger and last longer. Plus, I've got an update on the two-stroke book I've been working on that I'd like to share. Let's get started! A Universal Concern First, both new and re-plated cylinders must be cleaned prior to assembling. Normally the cylinders will arrive looking clean, but looks can be deceiving. I have no doubt that the factories and re-plating services clean the cylinders as part of their processes, but I highly recommend cleaning the bores a final time prior to use. Shown below is a new Yamaha cylinder that I extracted quite a bit of honing grit out of. If left in place, the honing grit will ensure that the piston rings will wear out faster than they need to, so be sure to take the time to properly clean new cylinders prior to assembly. What’s the best way to clean the cylinder bore? Start by using warm soapy water and a brush to clean the cylinder. Take your time and be thorough. After the majority of the honing grit has been removed switch to automatic transmission fluid and a lint free rag for one final cleaning. As a test to check cleanliness, rub a cotton swab against the cylinder bore. If the swab picks up any debris and changes color, your cleaning duties are not over. The swab should be able to be rubbed against the bore and remain perfectly clean. Two-Stroke Port Dressing For two-stroke owners, the second item I want to bring to your attention is port dressing. Port dressing is a term used to describe the process of deburring/breaking the edge at the intersection of the cylinder plating and the ports in the cylinder. During the plating process, plating usually builds up excessively at the edge of the port and must be removed after honing. Proper removal is critical to ensure acceptable piston ring life. Manufacturers and plating services will break the edge in different ways and to different magnitudes, which ends up being a whole other topic. The important thing is to ensure that any new or re-plated cylinder you use shows visible signs that the port edges have been dressed. A dressed port edge will be easy to spot because it will feature a different surface finish than the cross-hatch created from honing. This is easily visible in the image shown above. Many port dressing operations are done manually so some irregularity in the geometry will usually be present. If there is no visible edge break on the port edges, I would be highly suspicious and contact the service that plated the cylinder or sold the cylinder and confirm with them if a step was missed. Typically a chamfer or radius in the .020 - .040” (0.5 - 1mm) range is used. Two-Stroke Power Valves Lastly, it is possible that some of the power valve components, such as blades or drums, will not fit correctly on cylinders that have been replated. This is because the plating can occasionally build up in the slots or bores where the power valve parts reside. Prior to final assembly, be sure to check the function of the power valve blade and/or drums to ensure they move freely in their respective locations within the cylinder. If plating has built up in a power valve slot or bore, it will need to be carefully removed. To do this, appropriately sized burs for die grinders or Dremel tools can be used. If one is not careful, irreversible damage to the slot or bore can result. When performing this work proceed cautiously or leave it to a seasoned professional. Burs for the job can be difficult to track down in stores, but are readily available online from places like McMaster-Carr. When purchasing burs, be sure to pick up a few variants, such as rounded and square edged, designed for removing hard materials. The Two-Stroke Book From February to March we photographed the entire book. From April onward we have been formatting and proofreading. Needless to say, we are in the final stretch! If you want to stay updated on the moment the Two-Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook is ready for pre-order, sign up at the link below. We can't wait to get this book out the door and into your garage. Sign Up for Updates on the Two-Stroke Book Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week! -Paul
  8. Thought this mod will be straight forward, but no. Bought a KTM fan for my 450EXC, it come in a nice box, including the fan, wiring, thermalswitch, manual. Trial fit the fan on my right radiator as manual said, looks good: But then I found there are something unlike what it should be... 1. There is no matching available power connector on my bike 2. There is no where on both radiator for the thermalswitch to screw in In the below photo, circle #1 is the power socket from the fan, circle #2 is the connector to the thermalswitch. Manual said: Current wiring harness, no available outlet: Example of one radiator, no nozzle for thermalswitch: Any recommendation pls? Thanks.
  9. In an effort to redeem myself from dredging up an 11 year old thread yesterday I decided I would contribute some much sought after info to this forum. I am in the midst of a complete tear down and refresh of an '07 WR450. I started with the chassis, bearings, wheels, and suspension--and will work my way into the motor last. I am currently re-springing, sealing, and valving my fork, as the prior owner was much heavier and had it set up for him. All is smooth and easy until I get to removing the base valve (compression) to release the damper rod from the lower fork tube. In the past I had luck just shooting it with an impact and the assembly would be free. Not on this fork.... So I set about ordering the Motion Pro damper rod fork tool (Part # 08-0117) BUT that tool only works on 47 mm and under forks. The WR is 48 mm. And of course there is no chance of a dealer having the OEM Yamaha tool--or me paying the exorbitant amount for that piece of tooling. (OEM part #'s 90890-01494, YM-01494) Then it is off to the forums and Google to try and find some answers. I discover that many, many, bro's have asked about what tool to use, or a DIY trick such that they can remove the damper tube and base valve. Many suggest that having the fork leg fully assembled, with springs and all, then loading the upside down leg and shooting it with an impact driver will release the base valve from the damper tube. I definitely believe this and many report having success with that method, though it often requires an extra set of hands. I aint down with that....especially when it comes time to put it all back together and I am going to want the tool to assure that assembly is torqued to spec. So I set off to Home Depot with a fork lower, and my 2 year old. First to the plumbing aisles. First the kitchen and toilet stuff, no luck there. Then into the pipe aisle, 1-1/4 black, or galvanized pipe looks really close but the OD is too big. Time to get creative. Think about what other applications around the house use tubing, or pipe?.....preferably thin walled. Immediately I head to the closet and storage/shelving aisle....thinking clothes hanger rod. I take the 72" piece of decorative pipe and stick it into the fork leg in my cart, while the 2 year old amuses himself with my vernier caliper. Booyah, lets take this to the register, search over. I am very confident from eye-balling it that I can make the tool from this piece of closet hardware! I take the 72" piece and use a pipe cutter to chop off a 12" section from the end without the label sticker or barcode. (shit, I may just return it doubting the clerk is gonna measure) From that piece I make a trace of the OD of the 1-5/16 closet rod circle end. Then I divide the tracing up into equal parts by drawing a tic-tac-toe, or hashtag #### across it. Mark off 4 of the "boxes" on the end with black marker, and use a hacksaw and cut off wheel to remove all BUT the marked pieces. Leaving me with 4 prongs that resemble a "castle". Clean it all up with some filing, and grinding. Then I bored a 3/8" hole through the non-castle end to pass a piece of rod through to use as my handle. I fish the homemade tool around for a second, and it locks right into place! Then while holding the tool I shoot the base valve, 14 mm allen, with a cordless impact and it comes right out. I can't say for sure...but I do not think it was very tight and a "regular" hex wrench or allen socket would work just fine. Also I decided to take some measurements of the damper tube and its tooling receptacle should anyone ever want them. The outside diameter of the tube that protrudes above the flange for the removal tool is ~28 mm The 4 slots that the teeth of the castle tool will fit into are about ~15 mm The distance between the tool slots, when measured on center of 2 parallel holes is ~30 mm The inside diameter of the lower fork leg is ~46 mm It took me 45 minutes in the Depot to look, 20 minutes to fabricate the tool, and the material cost about $20. I have enough left over closet rod to probably make 7 more of these things! If I don't return the remaining 60" to the store...PM me with your address and like $6.10 shipping and I'll cut you off a piece! LOL I really hope this helps many people, and let me say...I can't believe how easy and well it worked! Check out the pics for clarity. You're welcome...
  10. So I have been wanting do to this build for a long time. Now that I have some time on my hands and the resources I need, I am going to give it a go. I am building a frame-mounted mini rally fairing. The components will all be 3D printed for the first iteration and I later plan to laser cut a stronger version and provide flat DXF files for laser cut metal versions. I will attach pictures as I design the mounting and as soon as I finish my prototype, I will release files so anyone else can make one too. I am not sure how I am going to create the fairing itself, I do have some fiberglass experience so I will most likely try that. My prototype will be installed on a 1983 XR350R I am rebuilding and I will also install one on my '85 XR600R and I may possibly make one for my '07 YZ250F as well, so the mounting will be designed to fit multiple makes and models. The fairing will house two LED light pods and have a mount for a standard sized cell phone. I may make other mountings for the fairing like a single light version or secondary mounts for trail computers etc. I plan to design it to be completely modular. The first iterations will all be installed with large zip-ties for easier modification. Later iterations will be either hard mounted (welded tabs) or bolted. Anyone who has attempted this before any advice would be appreciated. First prototype I am printing pictured below:
  11. While checking my valve clearances and putting on a hot cam on the exhaust i noticed my intake cam was a tooth off. Read about stock hydro one sometimes not doing its job. so instead of buy one for $60 a made one for my '08 250 xcfw with a the following. 10x1 60mm long bolt. 10mmnut and oring to fit bolt. make the hex end round so it fits through the case. Slot the other end for a flat head thread into stock cap install and tension. lock the nut down. used some blue locktight to make sure no oil leaks out.
  12. Taylorross

    1985 XR600R REBUILD PART 2

    Hello Thumpertalk, This thread will document the repair and assembly of my 85 xr600r. It's been a while so i thought id start a new thread. You can find the original thread here. Here we go! Showing the manual and C1 Gear high and low boss sides. below is the lower boss side. these were on backwards when i took them out if i remember correctly, would explain neutral to first and first to 2nd shifting slippage Blue ink is oem parts fiche diagram#'s Below is the Higher boss side C1 Same with C2 below. Higher boss side Lower boss side C2 below with the worst of the damage on any of the gear dog mating holes (please let me know the correct engineering term because that cant be correct Worst of the wear on any of the gear dogs Finished Main shaft and my brand new circlip/snap-ring pliers. excited to use these babies in the future on my next project (yes I'm already thinking of another one) Workbench Holy Clearance Specs Batman! Used Micrometer. All good. Wash Bin Completed Transmission!! Crankshaft and connecting rod. Falicon Rod In the shop right now getting cleaned straightened and pressed together. Couldn't resist a picture with my firefighter hat! Cleaning cases Masking Cases Primer and Paint start to finish in my super professional homemade painting booth Tape Off That's it for now! Going back to work tomorrow. Will Post pics next week of pressed crankshaft. Maybe paint other engine covers. Need to order Shift Drum pieces and have all the bearings pressed in Thanks guys! P.S. Please let me know if you see anything wrong or have any suggestions. HAPPY 4TH OF JULY!!
  13. Hello all, The clutch lifter in my bike is rusted and I have a new one to install. Is there a guide/steps/diy I can follow? Thanks!
  14. Hey guys, I just bought an XR650L (my 2nd) that had been used in enduro events for nearly 10 years. From there, it sat in a garage for about 5 years. I took it under my wing, and am trying to bring it back to life. It employs a high-compression piston, aftermarket cam, and 38mm Mikuni flat-slide carb. I cleaned the carb and entire fuel system, changed the oil, and replaced the spark plug, air filter and battery. Surprisingly, it started after only a few tries! Not surprisingly, it won't start or idle without choke. It idles high, and sputters until it dies when I wean off the choke or twist the throttle. It will rev smoothly with choke on. I'm new to the forum, thanks a TON for any input whatsoever!
  15. In today's post, I'm very excited to share details about my new book,The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. As with all of my blogs and technical resources, my goal has been to bring riders clear and concise technical information. My two-stroke book exemplifies this and puts nearly 300 pages of engine building knowledge at your fingertips. I wroteThe Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook to be an all-encompassing guide on engine building. From the moment there is doubt about the engine's overall condition to the time the rebuilt engine is broken in, I give you a step-by-step guide to help you work towards a successful build. My aim was to create a definitive resource that hit on all the relevant topics you'll encounter as you proceed through an engine build and take any guesswork out of the equation. Throughout the book, engineering knowledge and practical experience are fused together to detail the how and why behind the way procedures are performed, parts are designed, and engine performance is affected. This is the most important and valuable aspect of the book, and it's something you won't find in a service manual. The book doesn't just tell you to bolt part A to part B, it teaches and explains the correct way assembly procedures should be performed and why it is necessary to do so. It also explains the intricate relationship between parts, where to look for wear patterns, and shows examples of worn and damaged components. If you're interested in making modifications to your engine or if you're curious about how certain modifications affect performance, I wrote an entire chapter dedicated to the subject. Within this chapter a discussion on how performance parts such as expansion chambers, port timing modifications, and cylinder heads alter overall engine performance is included and helpful suggestions are provided to aid you in choosing the correct components for your build, depending on your specific riding needs. If you have a thirst to learn more about how your engine works and a desire to correctly disassemble or assemble an engine to professional standards, you will benefit greatly from this book. Whether a complete beginner or a seasoned builder, with nearly 300 pages and 250 images worth of information, there is fresh and useful knowledge for everyone. There is also valuable material packed into this handbook that doesn't just pertain to the act of building the engine. I include instruction on diagnosing engine problems, sourcing and determining which parts to replace, using precision measuring tools, setting up your workshop, and additional tests and inspections that should be performed when preparing racing engines. If you just want to build your engine back up to stock spec, you are covered. If you want to go the extra mile and prepare a racing engine, you are also covered. In a way, this book allows you to choose your own ending by giving you all the tools and knowledge you need to complete your build at whatever level you decide. As a way to thank you for your support, we're offering TT members 15% off during a special TT pre-sale which runs from now until December 5th (when the book officially launches). Simply follow this link to learn more and order: ThumperTalk Pre-Sale Thanks again for all your support as we've grown DIY Moto Fix from an idea to a thriving community of riders who are passionate about making their machines perform better through their own hard work. Thanks for reading and have a great week. -Paul
  16. Hey Guys, New to the forum! I purchased my Yamaha WR250f about 7 years ago. I have always hated the stock halogen light. It doesn't put out any light and is super dangerous to ride at night. I recently decided to design and build a custom LED headlight for my bike. It took me awhile to do research but I finally got everything installed and working. I purchased the LED Aux light from Superbrightleds.com. They have very high quality lights for the cost. I created a youtube video going over the build and performance of the light. I wanted to post this so others could get ideas for a similar build. Let me know if anyone has any questions. I'd be happy to give guidance if someone is wanting to do this on their bike. -Jason
  17. Bought this little tyke off FB marketplace for $400 not running, but with a rebuilt engine. He included all the old parts, which looked to be in good condition, except they looked rusty? He put all ebay parts on it: new jug, crank, bearings, seals, head, gaskets etc. After scouring the web for specs and measurements; I feel it is necessary to supply someone with my recipe of how I got to where I am right now. First things first: the bike started out completely OEM minus the oiler. So from here on out, ill be mixing my fuel 32:1. I have seen people go with less fuel, and while itll run damn good, its lifetime will go from 10+ years riding weekends, to 2 hot laps around a good track lol. Removed exhaust funnel (mine had a washer AND the funnel for some reason) removed the tiny S bend that connects the silencer to the main header. (I did this by using some 1/2" plumbing fittings welded together... ill try and get a pic of it. For the silencer; I use some 3/4" EMT tubing with a TON of holes drilled in it, slid through the center of the silencer and packed with MOOSE loose fiberglass) I really dont remember what I jetted it to; my local dealer only had a few jets that were close, and they seem to be working... I havent plug chopped it yet, but its already way faster than my TTR90, which used to outrun me. IN all honesty, I think its a 175 main. But I have heard of people tuning their bike by adjusting the oil content of the fuel. gave all the ports a very light chamfer, they started off razor sharp I plan on cutting the reed cage, just have not gotten to it. The previous owner removed some of the clutch balls so it engages later (higher rpm) but my clutches slip in 2nd and 3rd, maybe this is a side effect ill try swapping them out with my spare set that came with the bike. It started off with 120psi of compression, and is now at 180psi with the following mods: shaved .106" off of the top of the jug (A LOT!) which makes the piston hit the head... well, it hit my head, your maybe different. To extrapolate this a little: my squish zone was 4.5mm, and my target was 1.5mm to 1.7. NOTE: I removed a small amount before this whole escapade, but never recorded how much it was... I think it might have been .01-.015... not much... just go til the piston hits the head, and shim the jug up lol I cut some base gaskets from some gasket paper that measures .075mm (the stock gasket is .08mm in case you were wondering) I stacked i think 3 gaskets? The total jug gasket measures 1.355mm which raised my ports a little, and the brought the piston just far enough away so it doesnt hit anymore. Final squish zone is now 1.56mm (which is perfect IMO) rear sprocket is a used 35T from my ttr90. The front is a 14T. Factory gearing is 15/32 Front/rear. It has enough torque to pull a wheel with no pulling help. Sit still, lock your arms and gun it. Up she goes! I plan on changing the ratio to be more geared down for small tracks; seeing as the transmission ratio is WAAAYY too wide. Hope this helps someone. (machine I used to cut the head was a 1964 bridgeport knee mill, and a 4flute 3/4" carbide endmill, and I drilled a hole in some random aluminum plate I had lying around, beveled one side to fit the transfer port, slid it in through the exhaust port and bolted it to the table VIA a T-nut and a bolt. Bolted it, wiggle hard, tighten, wiggle, tighten until it wont go anywhere.... I was really worried about breaking this brittle casting. FWIW, I read through smacaroni's thorough displeasure with a tight cylinder gap only after I got mine all together. However, 1 thing I do remember is the piston is an egg from the factory by about 6 thou. (.006) HOWEVER! it does run, and has not locked up. When it first fires up in the afternoon (80F) you have to fiddle with the choke a bit, start rolling, turn the choke off, go from 0-100% throttle a few times before it starts to really run right. After shes warm, its all good.
  18. Paul Olesen

    How to Separate Your Crankcases The Right Way

    “Splitting the cases” is often referred to as a daunting or undesirable task, but if you are well prepared and properly equipped then it can be a straightforward job. To alleviate any concerns you may have with the task, I want to discuss best practices and share some tips that you may find useful when dealing with crank bearings that utilize an interference fit with the crankshaft. We’ll get started by discussing preparatory items and work through to completing the job. Preparation I always recommend prepping for crankcase separation by thoroughly reviewing the service manual. This is important in case any special instructions are present, such as guidance on how the crankcases should be positioned. Typically, it is advantageous to lift one half off the other in a certain orientation due to the way the gearbox or other components are installed. Secondly, a review of the manual may highlight any specific hardware that must be removed prior to attempting to split the cases. From a tools standpoint, a crankcase splitter tool is a worthy investment because it will help ensure the job goes smoothly. Case splitters are relatively inexpensive and widely available. Alternatively, for the budget conscious or lesser prepared, a case splitter is something that could be fabricated. Whether buying or making, ensure you pick up a model with a protective end cap for the crankshaft or fabricate one. We’ll discuss the end cap later. The other tools required are all fairly standard and include your typical sockets, wrenches, and soft mallets. Wooden blocks or other soft semi-malleable spacers should be selected which level and raise the crankcases off the tabletop. This allows the cases to be positioned so that the split line between the cases lies horizontally and subsequent splitting can be done vertically. This will help ensure evenness of separation as well as reduce the likelihood of components falling out of the cases unexpectedly. As much as shortcuts are desirable, just about everything external to the cases must be removed in order to successfully split the cases. Clutch, stator, crank gear, etc. must be removed prior to case splitting. Your service manual will provide further clarity as to what needs to come off. Technique & Tips Once you’re ready to separate the cases, the first thing we’ll need to do is remove all the crankcase bolts. The crankcase bolts should be removed via any prescribed patterns outlined in the service manual. Since the crankcase bolts are typically several different lengths, ensuring the location of each bolt is well documented is extremely important. As I discussed in my post on keeping track of bolts, the cardboard gasket method or any other you find suitable should be utilized so that the reassembly process is straightforward later on. After the crankcase bolts have been removed, the crankcases should be inspected one final time to ensure no hardware that should have been removed prior is hitchhiking. Trust me, trying to separate cases only to find there is one last forgotten bolt is quite frustrating! Once you’re confident all the necessary hardware has been removed, position the cases on the blocks with the correct half facing up. Next, install the protective cap over the crankshaft. I advise using the cap whether you own a two or four-stroke simply because in both cases it helps preserve the end of the crankshaft. This is of particular importance on four-stroke engines that utilize an oil feed that passes through the crank. Once the crank end is protected, proceed to install the crankcase splitter. Select threaded holes that are as close to equispaced from one another as possible to promote uniform loading of the case splitter. When threading the case splitter studs into the crankcase, make sure you engage at least 1.5 times the diameter of the stud diameter. For example, if the stud is 6mm in diameter make sure at least 9mm of thread engagement length is achieved. This will help ensure the threads are not stripped when you attempt to separate the crankcases. With the crankcase splitter installed begin tensioning the main bolt against the end of the protective cap. Proceed to tighten the bolt until the crankcases begin to separate about a 1/16” (1.5mm). Once separation has occurred, make sure that separation is even all the way around the cases. Due to the way the case splitter loads the cases, the area near the output sprocket tends to lag. Case separation needs to be even so that the dowel pins used to pair the cases together don’t bind. If the output sprocket end of the cases hasn’t separated, use a soft rubber or plastic mallet to gently tap in that area. Tap carefully and only on case areas that appear sturdy. Once you’ve created an even gap, proceed to tension the splitter bolt, tap when necessary, and fully remove the crankcase. Upon separation, make sure that no gearbox components, such as washers, have stuck to the case. What I’ve described is the ideal sequence of events for a successful case separation, however, occasionally the cases won’t be as cooperative. In the past, I’ve had to deal with crankcases where moisture has found its way into the dowel pin bores and corroded the dowel pins. This effectively seizes the dowel pins in their bores and makes the separation job more challenging. If the crankcases are being resilient to separation, stuck dowel pins may be a potential problem. Most dowel pins are located opposite one another and their exact position can often be referenced in the service manual or in the crankcase section of part microfiches. Once the location of the dowel pins has been confirmed, a torch can be used to lightly heat the dowel pin areas. Heat will expand the metal surrounding the dowel pin and aid in freeing up the stuck pin bore. Usually, a few careful rounds of heat, tension on the splitter, and well-placed tapping is enough to free up the pesky cases and get them separated. Alternatively, if the heat does not help, applying a penetrant to the pin bore areas is another option that may help free things up. If you find yourself dealing with stuck cases, the key is to be patient and think through all your options. In these types of situations, most mistakes are avoidable and are usually the result of rushed decisions. Once the cases have been separated, the remaining tasks of removing the gearbox and pushing the crank out of the remaining case half can commence. I hope you’ve enjoyed this write up on crankcase separation and that it makes you more prepared for the job. If you’ve got additional crankcase separation tips that you want to share, please leave a comment below. For additional engine building information, whether two or four-stroke, check out my engine building handbooks. Each handbook is offered in print or digital form, contains over 250 color pictures, detailed instruction from start to finish on full rebuilds, and contains a wealth of information pertaining to diagnostic testing and precision measuring. Thanks and have a great week! -Paul
  19. So I'm rebuilding the bottom end on my CRF250R 2010. All of the bearings on the case had openings on the back sides so I was easily able to just tap them out. But on one side of the case there is a bearing on the gears that is closed on the back side. So you have no access to the back of the bearing to tap it out. I didn't have a bearing puller (bad enought I had to spend $30 on the flywheel puller that took about 10 seconds to use before going back in the toolbox to hopefully never be used again) but I've used this method before for swingarm bearings and a few other bearings. I'm using a Shield Anchor. It's a concrete anchor for construction. I insert it through a socket and in the bearing. Tighten the anchor and then tap the bottom of the socket. Wholla! Bearing out in a minute. No case damage, just a cut on my finger. The first pic below shows the bearing puller installed. You can see after a few taps the bearing is coming out. The second pic shows using an open end wrench to tab the socket up. The vice grips are used to cancel the vibration in my hand. The rags on the engine casing are to keep the wrench from contacting the gasket surface edge of the case. You are tapping away from the case so you should make any contact with the wrench and case anyway. The rag is just precaution. The third pic shows the bearing out. The fourth pic is a close up of the shield anchor and the last is a pic of what they look like. These have saved me numerous times. Just thought I'd share with you guys. I've used this one bolt a lot and it's held up over time. It might be a good idea to keep a few sizes of these in the tool box.
  20. I haven't owned a bike in years and decided to pick up an 09' YZ450F. One of the first things it needed was a new set of rims so I bought some spokes to go with it and this is my first pass. Do my rims look like they're laced properly? Looking forward to getting back into it and being active on Thumper.. Cheers!
  21. I love DIY's. Couldn't find one on how to fix the radiator shroud fixing points in the fuel tank so I thought I'd make one. My bike is a 1999 KX250. Materials: - Insert screws - M6 screw and possibly a couple of nuts and washers - Drill - Alcohol cleaner - JB Weld Plastic Bonder - Grease This is the fuel tank. Bought it recently a repair that didn't hold up: Previous repair done with a impact nut, didn't do the job: The answer is insert nuts for wood. Can be bought at hardware stores and on eBay. You also need a M6 screw the same length as the insert. Mine were a little bit to long, fixed it with a couple of washers: 1. Start by drilling out the holes to fit the insert. In my case, that's 9.5mm: 2. Clean out the holes and the inserts with alcohol or similar: 3. Add some grease to the M6 screws and washers, you don't want the glue to stick to them: 4. Mount them together, be careful not to get grease on the outside of the inserts: 4. Use a good epoxy. Fat plastics are not easy to glue, JB Weld Plastic Bonder is the only one I could find that is recommended for fuel tanks. Also available in black. 5. Mix the glue according to instructions and fill half the hole, try to get rid of air pockets. I'd recommend you to do one hole at a time. 6. Screw in the inserts and remove excess glue. Then remove the M6. If you are worried the insert will follow the screw out you could do it like this. Keeping the screw still while releasing the nut will make them easier to remove. Mine came out without any problems: Looks a bit beaten up from the last repair but I'm certain it will hold up! And don't redo the mistake of over torquing the bots
  22. Hi everyone first time poster Was wondering if there is someone out there who has managed to make some homemade steg/leg pegs for a CRF250L. I have no means of making my own bracket or anything like that. I bought some door stoppers hoping to simply bolt them on but that wont work as the only available mounting spots are in bad spots. Any advice would be welcome. Sorry for any poor formatting, I'm very new to this sort of thing. Thank you.
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