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Found 116 results

  1. I have a 2006 kx250f and was wonderingly if I could swap the engine for a 450f. Does anyone know if I could do this?
  2. Is it possible to swap the working 110 taotao autoshift electric start from 4 wheeler into a manual shift kickstart taotao pitbike?? Looks like it has all the same mounting points.
  3. Previous owner used some sort of nasty sealer on 2000 KTM 125 headgasket. Razor blade would not touch it beyond this. I had 2 headgaskets out of 5 heads that were stuck this bad. Suggestions?
  4. I have the option of either installing SKF bearings or Koyo bearings . I was told by my local parts / Bearing retailer that SKF makes high quality brgs . Koyo have also earned a great reputation being a trusted brand as well . I'm seeking the opinions of the forum on this choice . Thanks for your input on this matter ! Application : 1984 YZ 250L
  5. Hey, first off I'm new to motorbikes so I may be using the wrong terminology here and there. I haven't run my bike for a few months and now it's not starting. I'm in neutral, tried the choke at different levels, full gas tank. I may have flooded the carbs, but I wanted to check the spark plug first because I have no clue about carbs. I've attached a photo of the spark plug, could this be the reason it's not starting? When removing the cap have I pulled too hard and snapped the wire (see photo), if I've snapped this piece what's it called and what am I replacing? Really appreciate the help, Cheers,
  6. I'm trying to help my buddy find a DRZ and we came across this E model with a blown engine for $500. Seems like a pretty good deal so long as the engine damage isn't too extensive. https://ashtabula.craigslist.org/mcy/d/2000-drz-400e-street-legal/6319866501.html He says he was on the highway and it locked up. He said the crank still moves to a certain point then gets stuck. Does anyone have any idea what the issue is? Figured if it was just a top end we could just put a big bore in it. We're gonna try to look at it this weekend, any ideas would be appreciated.
  7. These are pictures of a 2006 honda crf 250 right side case half. In the kick starter mechanism housing, there is a small piece of aluminum that bridges across a hole in the case. It broke off, and im wondering if anybody else has seen this before, and will it be an issue? I dont think it serves a purpose, but i would like a second opinion. Thanks!
  8. Whats up everyone I'm pretty new to the forum so I'm not sure if I'm posting in the correct spot.Either way I need some help! what year kickstart levers will fit my 2007 yz450f. I got away with a Kim lever off a 525 exc but now I'm looking online and can't find much but one option for 130$ I'm seeing a lot of options for 2011 levers around 75$ and they look nicer with a blue instead of silver. Does anyone know what size the spline is? what other years I could possibly use? thanks in advance. On another note my oil filter housing bolt is stripped like most I see are dealing with. I have googled away and cannot seem to find where to order that bolt.
  9. So I've got a 1993 husky wxc250 2t , but that doesn't matter too much I just need a starting point on something that went wrong. I was about ten minutes into my ride when this happened - I was about halfway through third gear, not an excessive rpm, and I heard a very aggressive noise from the motor, I pulled in the clutch and coasted to a stop (the motor had died). I was almost positive I had blown the motor and it was going to be seized. But when I pushed the kick starter down everything was fine. I pushed it back home, pulled the plug, turned it over, turned it through all the gears and nothing felt wrong. So I figured I would just start it up and give it a shot. I started it up and it sounded fine on idle, but as soon as a gave it any throttle a very loud "clanking" noise came from the top end. Almost comparable to a rod knock, but I can tell it is coming from the top end. My best guess would be something in the power valves, I am experienced with working on motors but power valves are new to me. What do you guys think it is? I'm just looking for I tip before I tear into it. Thanks in advance - Devin
  10. ive got a 1997 yz250 and it needs replating or boring. idk about it because ive always been able to go to the local machine shop and they can do it. can i do that or do i have to send it in somewhere?
  11. I have recently done a lot of maintenance to my WR 450f and there are still some issues which concern me with it, when I took out the clutch basket there was a gear with a bent piece on it (picture attached) This was probably done by the previous owner but I think it should probably be replaced? - When I checked the valves they were only opened for measuring when the knob things were pointed down instead of up, (picture attached) I dont know if the timing is messed up or if it has been retarded to the yz specs. ( the picture of the cam chain was when the valves were open, at the same time as the knob things were downwards in the other picture). -There is also a clattering noise from the engine but it seems to run fine? I will try to make a video for mine soon but it sounds pretty much like this persons - sorry about the bad pictures.
  12. 2009 YZF250 - Ex Dixon bike with the wet sump conversion. Stuck a bunch of quality hours on this thing the other weekend doing some enduro practice. Didn't skip a beat! Changed out the oil and filter, putoline - 850ml with filter change as recommended by someone off the dixon facebook page. Fresh airfilter. Didn't start it for a few days after the oil change as was late at night after service, warmed it up at trackside this weekend with no issues to get the oil flowing, checked pressure by removing the bolt, all fine... Killed it. Came back to the bike about 15 mins later started fine, rode literally about 100m (wasn't hanging around but not going mad) and she just died under load, instant death. I believe it locked up, hard to recall. Didn't feel right either-way, i've had bikes flame out on me (CRF450) and this was a bit different. Bike started OK afterwards, I sat there with it on idle for about 10 seconds, all good, gave it some throttle and it just came to an abrupt stop again, almost made a squeak when it stopped. Rolled back to pits, checked oil filter, was fully soaked, everything looked fine, rads weren't exactly hot but i'd only been riding for a short period, head was pretty hot to touch, crank didn't seem that hot - but then again i've never touched an engine after 4 minutes of running so I've no idea what sort of temp it should be haha. Bike started again fine after little inspection, idled OK. Sounded sweet, no rattles or bangs. Started to give it some throttle, rolling the revs and it just came to a screeching stop again. Kicked it in anger and it hasn't started again since. Gave it a little strip down last night, took valve cover off, all looks normal, valves are in spec still, took the carb off and had a look down the inlet, small little bits of something foreign in there and the tiniest of metal slivers sitting ontop of one of the valves. (By this point i'd already dropped oil and filter for inspection, nothing that looked out of place) Now the bike kicks over OK. Its never had the strongest of compression on kick, but its been a while since i've had a 250F. it does 'get hard' at certain points but its pretty easy to kick through these hard points normally just body weight will do it. Can any of you advise on moving forwards, i'm going to remove head and cylinder for inspection but i've never dug this deep into an engine before haha! Any thoughts or tips on things to look out for? Bike has a spark I should add, not that this really felt like a lack of ignition.
  13. Hello, I am looking for a used 125cc dirt bike. I am puzzeled because I do not know what I want, what would you guys recommend and why would you recommend it. Also where could I get performance mods, specifically suspension and which of the bikes have the most tuning capabilities. I've narrowed my choices down to Kawasaki kx,Honda cbr/xr, Yamaha yz, and Suzuki rm around the 2000-2005 range. I'd rather hear from people who owned one of the bikes but advice from any of the experts is welcome P.S I'm sorry for any mistakes like the wrong "sub forum" or grammar as I'm on mobile
  14. Hello All, Well, I came home with a 2013 RMZ250 today and I am super excited. This will be a project bike for me as the motor is currently locked up. I got this bike for such a good deal, I could not pass it up. I dont know much about it yet, but tomorrow, I will drain the oil and start opening up the sides of the engine to see what I can find. Since this is my first Suzuki, do you have any suggestions on where to start? Also, anyone have a 2013 Service manual? That would really help me out. Just wanted to start this thread as I am sure I will have numerous questions and you guys are the pros. Wish me luck and check back for updates. Cheers!
  15. So I've 3d printed the crank truing stand, I'll upload that to thingiverse soon, may make some improvements first. It uses skate bearings. The crank is well within spec. maybe .04mm max at the very ends of the crankshaft. I've never trued a crank before, this is my first time measuring one even. The manual shows where to measure it. I'm curious if it's even worth the trouble to try and get it perfect, probably not obtainable. Obviously I can't smack the crank on these PLA stands
  16. story time So i have always been told that a Flywheel weight is the tits on a yz250, so naturally, i installed one within a month of owning my new blue monster. The YZ250 is a genuinely incredible machine and making it as luggable as a diesel was a really great decision. It makes cornering, traction and so many other parts of riding alot easier. Its easy to see why even the top riders of back in the day used them as a mod. i chose the 11 oz size by Steahly. Today i was riding at AJS motocross in Western Australia when the engine completely went on me. I thought i had blown the bike and i was fairly upset as i had a week of riding planned ahead of me. I spent a couple hours stripping the bike down but found the motor itself in reasonable condition. What had happened instead was the flywheel weight had come a little loose (like there is absolutely no room in that flywheel bay. the 11 oz leaves zero space left before it hits the cover) and wedged itself on the cover. This was what caused the "Seized" engine. I have pretty well destroyed the thread on the flywheel shaft rod thing which ill have to some how fix. This is upsetting as its caused alot of grief and will stop me using that flywheel weight again as its thread is trash and i wont risk that happening again. Is this a common Problem? i torqued the weight properly and checked it after the first ride so its pretty surprising. This was the flywheel weights maybe 5th ride.
  17. HI. So i am in the process of putting new studs on the cylinder in my 2001 CR80r! I am just wondering if i need to torque the studs if so what is the torque spec?
  18. Today I'm going to cover how to check and set cam timing, which is something you can do if you have adjustable cam gears in your engine. This is a procedure often performed by race engine builders to ensure the valvetrain performs just as they intend, and ultimately so that they extract the desired performance out of the engine. Adjustable cam gears typically aren't a stock option but are abundantly available in the aftermarket. The following text is exerted from my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook, so if you find this info valuable please take a look at the entire book. Degreeing the camshafts is the process of checking, and if necessary altering, the cam timing so that the timing is set perfectly to specified timing values. On stock and performance engines, cam timing can be off slightly due to manufacturing variations in parts such as the camshafts, cam gears, cam chain, cylinder, cylinder head, crankshaft, crankcase, and gaskets. With so many parts having an influence on cam timing, it is necessary to adjust and correct the timing so it coincides precisely with the desired timing values. The biggest factor determining how the camshafts must be timed is whether the cam lobes are symmetrical or asymmetrical. Camshaft lobes that are symmetrical have opening and closing ramps that share the same profile. Asymmetrical cam lobes have opening and closing ramps with different profiles. Symmetric and asymmetric camshafts are timed differently. First we will focus on the timing of symmetrical camshafts. Symmetric camshafts are timed most accurately by determining the position of the camshaft’s lobe center in relation to crankshaft position. A camshaft’s lobe center is where peak lift occurs, which is the most important timing event of the camshaft. Since the tip of the camshaft is rounded, it would be difficult to determine the lobe center by taking a direct measurement of peak valve lift. The opening and closing points of the camshaft are also of little use because the cam opens and closes gradually. This makes it difficult to determine the precise position in which the camshaft opens or closes the valves. The lobe center position is a calculated value based on the position of the camshaft at two specific points of valve lift, typically with valve clearances set to zero. Normally the position of the camshaft is recorded at 0.050” (1.27mm) of lift as the valve opens and 0.050” (1.27mm) of lift when the valve closes. By recording the position of the camshaft at a specific valve lifts, the cam lobe is on a predictable portion of the opening and closing ramps. The center of the cam lobe is exactly in the middle of these two measurements. To calculate the lobe center of a symmetrical cam lobe you will need to do the following: 1. Add the measured opening and closing timings together 2. Add 180 degrees to the sum 3. Divide the answer by 2 4. Subtract the smaller value of the two opening and closing numbers from the answer to reach the lobe center value. Once the actual lobe center value has been determined on the engine, it can be compared to the specified lobe center timing presented by the manufacturer, aftermarket cam supplier, or the engine tuner. If the measured lobe center position coincides with the targeted position, all the work is done. If not, the cam gear will need to be adjusted so the timing is corrected. If you are checking the timing on stock cams and lobe center information isn't presented, you will need to determine the lobe centers the manufacturer recommends. To do this, the opening and closing timing information supplied in the service manual can be used. Aftermarket camshafts should come with a timing card full of useful information to set the cams correctly if they are adjustable, otherwise the lobe centerline can be calculated if the opening and closing timings are known. If you don’t like math, there are plenty of lobe center calculators available on the internet you can use. For the Kawasaki KX250F engine with the stock camshafts, the timing information is as follows: Intake Opens 40° BTDC (Before Top Dead Center) Intake Closes 72° ATDC (After Top Dead Center) Intake Lobe Center = ((40 + 72 + 180) ÷ 2) - 40 = 106° My calculated lobe center timing is 106°. When I check the cam timing, this will be the value the real engine hopefully yields. The lobe center for the exhaust cam can be found the same way. For the KX250F exhaust cam: Exhaust Opens 69° BBDC (Before Bottom Dead Center) Exhaust Closes 49° ATDC (After Top Dead Center) Exhaust Lobe Center = ((69 + 49 + 180) ÷ 2) - 49 = 100° Something not obvious I want to touch on is that if the intake opens after top dead center, a negative value for the opening should be used. If the exhaust closes before top dead center, a negative value should be used here as well. To start the process of checking the timing the valve clearances should be set to zero. Thicker shims can be used and zero clearance can be confirmed with a lash gauge. A degree wheel and pointer will need to be installed on the engine. There are many ways of attaching these items and each engine will provide its own challenges. Here I’ve left the flywheel on and installed a couple washers behind the degree wheel to space the degree wheel from the flywheel. Then the flywheel nut is used to secure the degree wheel. The pointer can be made from welding rod, a coat hanger, or anything else you can find. I’ll be finding TDC with the cylinder head installed, so I used one of the exterior head bolts to secure the pointer. If you will be finding TDC with the head off, choose another location. Before the cams can be timed, TDC must be found. This can be done with the cylinder head on or off depending on the process you use. The piston dwells a few degrees at TDC so more accuracy than zeroing the degree wheel to the piston’s highest position is necessary. Similar to finding the cam lobe center, TDC can be found by measuring equal distances on the piston’s up and down stroke and then confirming that the degree wheel timing is equal on both sides at the measured distances. Dial indicators or piston stoppers are commonly used to do this. HOT TIP: Piston stoppers can easily be made by removing the center section of a spark plug and then tapping a suitably sized threaded hole in the remaining part of the plug so a bolt and lock nut can be installed. The stopper can then be easily threaded into the spark plug hole. Whichever method of finding TDC you decide to use, start by moving the crankshaft to the approximate TDC position. Then without rotating the crankshaft move the degree wheel so that TDC on the wheel coincides with the pointer. Next, set up your piston stops or measure piston travel on both sides of TDC. In this example I’m using a dial indicator which extends through the spark plug hole down into the cylinder. I’ve decided to take measurements at 0.050” (1.27mm) of piston travel before and after TDC. At each measurement point the number of degrees indicated on the degree wheel before and after TDC should be the same if I have found true TDC. If the degree wheel values don’t read the same before and after TDC determine which way the wheel must be rotated so that the values become equal. Then carefully rotate the degree wheel without rotating the crankshaft to alter the degree wheel’s position. Once altered, recheck and confirm that true TDC has been found. This can be a tedious process but is extremely important for checking cam timing accurately. Repeat the procedure for checking TDC 3 - 5 times to ensure repeatability and accuracy. After true TDC has been found, be extremely careful not to inadvertently move the degree wheel or pointer. Do not rotate the crankshaft using the nut securing the degree wheel to the crankshaft. Instead, use the primary drive gear nut or bolt to rotate the engine over. Next, set up a dial indicator on the intake or exhaust lifter bucket, depending on which camshaft you are checking. You’ll have to use some ingenuity here in determining the best way to secure the dial indicator to the engine. I’ve used a flat piece of steel and secured it to the cam cap using the cylinder head cover holes. Make sure the indicator travels as parallel to the path of valve travel as possible for accurate readings. Also makes sure at least 0.060” (1.52mm) of travel from the indicator’s resting position is possible so adequate valve lift can be measured. Once the indicator has been set up, the cam timing can be checked. Whenever checking timing only rotate the engine over in the direction of engine rotation. Reversing engine rotation will result in inaccurate measurements due to the reversal of gear meshes and chain slack. If you miss a measurement point, rotate the engine over until you get back to the previous position. Slowly rotate the engine over until 0.050” (1.27mm) of valve lift has occurred. Then record the position of the degree wheel. Next, rotate the engine until the cam begins to close the valve. Once only 0.050” of indicated valve lift remains record the position of the degree wheel. Repeat this process of checking opening and closing positions 3 - 5 times to check for repeatability before calculating the cam lobe center. Once you are confident in your measurements proceed to calculate the cam lobe center. On the KX250F engine my intake lobe center is as follows: Measured Intake Open (0.050” Lift) 39 ° BTDC Measured Intake Closure (0.050” Lift) 74 ° ABDC Intake Lobe Center = (( 39 + 74 + 180 ) ÷ 2 ) - 39 = 107.5° On my stock KX250F engine the actual lobe center is 107.5°. At this point if I had adjustable cam gears, I could rotate the gear slightly so that the lobe center corresponded to the specified lobe center value. The same procedure is followed for checking and adjusting the exhaust cam timing. Remember if mistakes are made when setting cam timing big problems can result, so it is best to be very patient and focused when performing this task. Always check your work 3 - 5 times to make sure the timing is repeatable and making sense. When tightening adjustable cam sprockets, use a locking agent and be sure to torque the bolts to their specified values. When working with single camshafts that have both the intake and exhaust lobes ground on them, focus your efforts on achieving correct intake timing. Correctly setting intake timing is more important since it has a larger effect on power. The intake valves also have higher lift than the exhaust valves, potentially creating clearance troubles between the piston and valve if the intake valves are mistimed. With your new fangled ability to adjust cam timing, you may be wondering what happens if you advance or retard the intake and exhaust cams from their standard positions? The lobe separation angle refers to the number of degrees which separate the lobe center of the intake lobe from the lobe center of the exhaust camshaft. The lobe separation angle can be calculated using the following formula: LSA = (Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline) ÷ 2 As a rule of thumb, reducing the lobe separation angle by advancing the intake and retarding the exhaust camshaft will increase valve overlap, move power further up the power curve, increase cylinder pressure, increase the chance of detonation, and reduce the piston to valve clearances. On the contrary, increasing the lobe separation angle by retarding the intake cam and advancing the exhaust cam will have somewhat of the opposite effect. There will be less valve overlap, power will move to a lower RPM, chances of detonation will be reduced, and the valve to piston clearances will increase. The likelihood of finding more or better power by advancing or retarding the camshafts is not all that likely because manufacturers, tuners, and aftermarket companies already test specific combinations of cam timings to death. In addition, if the lobe separation angle is reduced, the piston to valve clearances should be checked to ensure they are adequate. My advice is to run the prescribed cam timings to reduce the chance of problems occurring. Asymmetric camshaft timing can be set in a similar fashion to symmetric camshafts, however instead of focusing on the lobe center position, the specific opening and closing points will need to be measured. Timing cards supplied with asymmetric cams should have specific instructions for setting timing, but normally valve clearance is set to zero and cam positions are recorded at specific lift heights. Based on the measured opening and closing positions, adjustments are made to the timing until the timing matches the specified values. I hope you enjoyed this exert on checking and adjusting cam timing. As always feedback is appreciated so please leave comments below. If you're interested in more engine building info check out my book The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. Right now we are having a 4th of July Sale where everything on our site is 20% off with the discount code fourthofjuly2017. Just be sure to enter the code upon checkout so you receive your 20% off! So if you've had your eye on our Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook or even our Value Pack, but haven't pulled the trigger yet - go for it! Availabe at: DIYMotoFix.com - Paul
  19. i recently crashed my drz and now it makes this noise. can anyone please tell me what is wrong so i can trry and fix it thank you so very much! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_NgdnZe8XIs
  20. I bought a "2000" yz125 from someone. Shortly after purchasing the bike, I checked the vin and realized it is actually a 1999. Off to a good start. The previous owner told me he put a new top end in the bike and saw the clearance value of 0.002 inches on the wiseco piston box, so he thought that meant to bore the cylinder out the much... no big deal, its a pretty insignificant amount. I start the bike up and ride it around, but it has practically no power at all. It revs up fine on the stand, but it has absolutely no power when riding. So I started checking stuff. The power valve actuator arm moves when the revs go up, good. The valves themselves are new (he also replaced the entire assembly). The valves do no stick, and they move with the actuator, so I know that is working properly. Next I check the reeds, they are not damaged at all. Then I check the exhaust. It does not appear to be blocked anywhere, so thats out of the question. Then I do a compression test, and it comes out to 105 psi... found my problem. I'm just not sure why it has no compression with a new top end. The clearances between the cylinder and the piston look good, and the ring does not appear to be damaged (I have not take the jug off the bike yet). The cylinder walls looks bad though. There is no visible crosshatching, and there are weird patterns in the walls. The previous owner took the cylinder to a friend of his to remove that 0.002 inches, so I'm assuming he did not hone the cylinder properly. I'm kind of at a loss, and I don't want to replace the whole top end again. I am attaching pictures of the cylinder and a view of the piston and exhaust valves from the exhaust port. Does any of this look right? Also, he said that he lost the "top cap" when doing the top end. I assume that means the head because the motor mounts don't line up properly. He said he took a "top cap" from an rm125 or something that was laying around the shop, so I'm thinking that could be a possible culprit for the low compression. Any insight is helpful. Thanks.
  21. HI. I have CRF450r 2007. (Sorry for my inglish. I am from Georgia. Tbilisi ) thanks . I want to by Wiseco or same piston. My bike bore size is 96.03 mm (I do not know for sure. Car engine master told me). I am interesting about clearance between bore and Wiseco piston. What clearance will be between wiseco piston and my bike bore ? What size of same piston i need tu buy for my baike bore size? What is the real size of wiseco piston for crf 450r/ or maby will i buy another brand piston. When i look to my cylynder, i see good hone and it looks like new. mayby engine master is vrong about size.
  22. Hi guys, couple of weeks back I had reassembled the engine of my DR350SE and properly filled it with oil according to the manual. Last night, after driving it for around 300km I noticed some engine oil on the block itself. It looked like it came from the clutch lever and also from the starter motor bearing (probably when it was laying on the side when I ghosted it few times). Therefore, I decided to check the oil level... and the dipstick was dry. It took whopping 400-500ml just to get it back to the norm!!! I have two questions now... Where/how that much oil could have gone, and how much damage could this have causes my poor DR?? Thanks!
  23. I went with a friend of mine to look at and ultimately purchase a used 2007 CRF50 last week. While originally checking it out, I noticed that the idle would hang a bit after letting off the throttle (basically after the throttle is open and then closed, the engine will stay at a high RPM and not settle back down to normal idle for different amounts of times - sometimes just a few moments, other times up to 8-10 seconds), I figured it would be something minor like the throttle cable or gummed up carb, so I told him it was good and he bought it. I took it to my house to go over it and see if I could figure the issue out, but have been unsuccessful. I changed the oil, spark plug and filter (the filter and interior of the air box were pretty sopping wet with oil when I first opened it up). I also took the carb apart and rebuilt it fully with an all balls kit. None of this changed the mannerisms that I described above. I checked the cable and it seems fine, I also could actually see the slide opening and closing with the throttle tube in the carb. I've been told that this issue might be due to an air leak after the carb. I sprayed carb cleaner all over the intake in an attempt to find a leak, but I wasn't sure if I did. There were a few times that I sprayed and the idle hopped up, other times it didn't. I did set the fuel/air screw and idle screw at the factory setting after the rebuild as well. I feel bad because I went to look at the bike with my buddy and told him it was good, and now I can't get it straightened out for him. Any help or suggestions would be much appreciated. I can give a better description or put a video up of it if that would help. Thanks!
  24. Hello I want to order a 2016 gearbox but I have a question. Does a rmz 250 2016 gearbox fit in a rmz 250 2015 engine ? because I have always have problems with the 15 gearbox and the 16 gearbox is much better i have ask 6 local dealers but they think it fits but nowone nows it for sure do anybody can help my ? Greetings Rens
  25. Hey guys, I went to see this 625 SXC LC4 whis is sold in a good price but the condition is not that good. I recorded the engine sound so that possibly experienced owners can recognize any engine problems such as camshaft bearing failure etc. I appreciate any input...
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