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Found 39 results

  1. Hey guys, I'm new to thumper, but I was hoping I could find someone who could help me. HERES THE DEAL! I've been riding 4 strokes for about 7 years now, but the 2T world has recently gotten my attention! I currently ride a 2006 YZ250F. (Fully rebuilt by myself;). I ride the piss out of it and I feel like it's missing something. I've tried shaking things up like riding different terrain(sand dunes,Rocks,etc.) I thought maybe I would try a 450, I got to ride my buddies CRF450X. lol that bike humbled me. It was way to high and It felt a LOT heavier. I crossed out the 450 bc I think it would be a waste and I wouldn't be able to push the bike to its limits. With that being said I'm trying to decide between (2017 Ktm 150 sx, 2017 Ktm 250sx, and 2017 YZ250 and/or the X model). Here's me.. I'm roughly 5'8" 175-185lbs. I lift 5-6 days a week. I enjoy riding anything and everything as long as I get to ride.
  2. Hey everyone! I went out to the desert last weekend and decided to record it. We rode mostly tight sand washes. Check it out! PS Turn up the resolution and the cameras were faced too far down but I tried to make it work
  3. Fun solo ride before the recent Northern Cali storm, lots of fun good conditions
  4. I guess the glory days of winning the MXdN left with Carmichael & RV eh? The tables have turned and the best we can hope for is top five, now. Lord Alfred (shudder) was correct.
  5. Hey there! Looking for new people to ride with in Johnson Valley/Barstow area. Trying to learn new technical skills, push myself, and stay dedicated. I'm a beginner/intermediate rider, pretty new to the sport looking for cool people to ride with. Just a heads up I'm a 19 y/o girl.
  6. Hello everyone! đź‘Ť I would like some help regarding which Supermoto-style front fenders fits a 2017 KTM 500 EXC-F Six Days. There's 2 screw holes in the back off my current off-road fender that mounts in the back of the lower clamp. A friend suggested a 690 SMC-R or Husky FS300-570 but I'm not sure since I've only seen pictures. (OEM partnumber: 7730821000028)
  7. Looking for new friends to ride with. For this wknd I would have my 8 yr old and he rides too! Moto camp beers fun. Ya?
  8. I am not here to sell you a product: "Try this protein powder, you'll get bigger", or "Buy these shoes, you'll run faster", or "Buy this bike, and you'll win more races". I've been both the guy trying to sell you something (in which I believed the products to be sound), and I've also been the guy buying these different products. For the most part, the results from many of them have been less then stellar. Some from my lack of commitment, others didn't meet my personal requirements, but mostly because they were simply J.U.N.K... So why do I feel a bolt on dirt-bike shock should be excluded from my original statement? Because I only want to sell you an experience... I can only relate my experience as "threading the needle" as I felt most of this story is exactly that. Though the performance of the National Shock was recognized on paper, the reality of how good the National Shock really is became apparent when I hit the dirt. In 2nd gear, on the throttle hard coming out of a right hand turn into a straight stretch I never shut the throttle off as I threaded perfectly though a recent fresh cut log, approx. 15in in diameter and less then 12in apart hiding in the grass. It was at that moment the National Shock revealed how good suspension could really be. Not once did the fear of the rear end stepping out, the lose of traction or some unexplained event cause me to shut the throttle off. I could simply say it was confidence. In no other times in questionable traction conditions (or any conditions I imagine) would I have thought this was possible. That single experience has carried the way I have tested this shock since. I have 'threaded the needle' in most every situation I can think of and not once have a thought any less of the performance offered by this Mx-Tech National Shock. There wasn't an area I didn't feel the shock didn't offer top level performance above not only my stock shock, but my highly modified stock shock also by Mx-Tech. We have a sand track with a hard base that get baked in the summer, the rollers that develop are not of envy. They are difficult to time correctly, deep, rutted and offer no mercy to half-throttle riders. Even the best tire quickly if not conditioned. I hit the track with a bit of intimidation. but the result was a shock that never faulted. If it did bottom, I couldn't feel it... Maybe I imagine the shocks bottoming characteristics are one of those of dropping a bowling ball onto a mattress, not a concrete floor? Everything felt smooth, comfortable and in control, no packing or such. I do believe the shock overall was too soft for the kind of riding as it was setup for off-road but still... An example being a small step-up that you need to land off the previous jump and bounce back on top The shock was absorbing the impact and not giving me the full 'pop' or bounce I needed. I always clipped with top with the rear wheel but never out of control. If the stop-watch was on I bet I still did this section faster. Flat corners, bermed corners, inside or outside, I was able to put the bike where I wanted with more accuracy then before. When coming into braking bumps both large and small, the National Shock followed the ground with more control, eliminating the 'shock or sting' of bottoming while not kicking in both a side to side/up and down direction. The bike felt stable and comfortable as the shock was not transferring any feedback through the bike either. Braking could be done considerably later, and with more precision and control. When coming into corners I could not only hit them faster but with more accuracy, which in turn allowed me to carry more speed out of the corners then Imight have been previously familiar with. The traction coming out allowed for the bike to push forward with more drive and confidence knowing the rear end was sticking to the ground and not hunting. Everything displayed was welcomed and not one single fault could be found. Being a off-road guy I took to the trails as part of my test(s). In every single situation on my loops, the National Shock found traction that otherwise was not previously there due to the slippery conditions. Whether is was up some of the rock faces, or through rock gardens the shock followed the ground, never skipping, kicking or becoming unpredictable. The traction created more drive, in turn more momentum which allowed me to hit obstacle with not only more speed but more control too. I'm a good log hopper... Any size, angle, or multiples in a row I have always felt comfortable jumping them. The shock seemed to absorb them better with no kick. Lining up logs became easier, micro-corrections took less effort. Could I complain the shock was maybe a little too good in this are? When jumping logs in sequence, you want suspension a little firmer so you can get both the distance and height. Unfortunately the shock absorbed logs too well. When it came to ruts, or muliple ruts, the bike tracked straighter and didn't want to climb out. Side-hills could be hit with more speed and accuracy, and with less fear of the rear end stepping out causing you to slide to the valley bottom. Overall, two things I found to be most important are 1.) I could 'thread the needle' on every obstacle. I could do everything closer to the edge then I could have done before. I could hit a log straighter, jump off it farther while coming into a corner with braking bumps, brake late and get on the throttle sooner while lining up a rutted hill-climb. Straight up, I was faster. and with a higher level of confidence. The other being that because I could do this with less effort, I wasn't as tired as I might have been before. Since starting this review I have ridden multiple times with National Shock and every time has been better then the last as I am looking to find something that would show me otherwise, I haven't. Edit: In my initial testing, I didn't have Mx-Techs supplied shock spring. When combined with the National shock (included in purchase) you get an approx. 1lb weight savings over the stock shock. With all that being said, The Mx-Tech National Shock is on my short-list for Santa for 2020 off-road season. Its simply that good....
  9. Marvin (KTM) is smart. Really seems like he's racing for the fun of it and because of that, the spotlight is directly on him and everyone is talking about him. Of course I'm sure he's contracted to race this straight rhythm put on by Red Bull, but last night I found myself calling him the fastest guy on a bike right now despite being a Tomac fan. Feels like the Kawasaki program is built on pressure and fixation, while the Red Bull KTM vibe is more open ended. Really seems like Tomac's attitude since getting on that team is racing only when he absolutely has to and then putting a huge amount of pressure on himself when he does. They say Baker's program burns you out but I'm seeing way more burnout from Tomac at them moment. And I feel thanks to these off season races Musquin will come into A1 the favorite. Just my observation.
  10. I just had a few questions related to the proper way to trailer your bikes, I will be trailering 2 bikes a yz250fx and a ttr125l, I first want to know if it really matters that one bike is alot heavier than the other since they will be side by side in the trailer. Next I have 2 wheel chocks and I was wondering if I should have another tie down point in between them so the straps are not pulling more to one side, If that is the case is it okay to just bolt it onto the wood floor? or would that not be strong enough? Thanks,
  11. Growing up, seeing motovans at the track was possibly one of the coolest things.. while I was sleeping in my singlecab pickup. But hey, at the time, in highschool, my truck was cooler than some van. Now at this "age" 24... a van is quite a dang good idea, so I started looking. After a few facebook pots, a buddy of mine knew someone who had a 2001 E350 Passenger van sitting, and would get me a price. he told me it needed a radiator, and the spark plug blew out of cylinder 4 (common 5.4 triton issue). A few days go by, and he calls saying I can have it for FREE! they just needed it gone! So, I go out there with a friend of mine who has a 30ft gooseneck, and some starting fluid to make sure I don't get in too deep... we cant get it to fire without starting fluid, and ruled it out to a fuel pump. We pull the van on the trailer, stop by the parts store, and are headed home. The van was sitting stationary for 4 years... and smelled like it. but we'll get back there.. We dropped the tank, having to cut one of the tank straps and emptied the 4 year old fuel, put a new fuel pump in it, about 5 gallons of premium race fuel (fast and furious), and she fired up. Next was the spark plug issue, I tapped the threads, and installed a helicoil along with new plug and coil pack, and we were good. Later I replaced the radiator after flushing the coolant system. The next day, we pulled out everything behind the first row bench seats, to include the headliner, rear AC duct, and side panels. Had to cut out the old seat belt mounts, and reinstalled the last bench where the first bench originally resided, since it was longer, but a few inches back to have optimal leg room. Then came the wall install... after lots of measuring once and cutting twice... I got it all figured out, and had the wall installed, then yellow stuffed "expanding foam" around all sides to ensure I wouldn't have fuel fumes in the cab. Finally I installed some flooring, just to give the bare metal some protection. After that, I was king of burned out on the van, before I even used it. She sat in my driveway for months before I was ticketed for having an unregistered vehicle parked outside.. gotta love florida.. I posted it forsale for a few days, then decided I would getRdone. So, off to the DMV, registered, and custom plates reading "MOTOVAN". Picked up a heavy duty cargo lock, fuel treatment, tons of black ice "little trees", and some R-134 to recharge the AC. She was making her first trip to the track that weekend! We changed the oil, 1,000 miles and 3 years overdue... only 2qts came out.. and sea foamed the green monster. After driving all over town, I parked in the driveway for a second, only to try to move it, and nothing on start up... not even after a jump.. so back to the parts store for a starter. After one of the worst starter jobs ever, she was cranking again. I figured we were problem free... but not before a brake line failed, and had to replace that guy, in order to take her to the track in 2 days! Finally! we were all clear, and we loaded three bikes into the van, and we were off! Two bikes is preferred.. but three worked, juts had to put most of the gear in the cab. Was a great day of riding, before a buddy crashed and ended the day with a concussion and a few compressed vertebrae.. The van made another trip out this past weekend, and developed a new misfire, that ill be taking care of this week, and rechargeing the whole AC system since ill be sleeping in it this weekend for my first race in years! I will add some photos off my phone in a bit, until then, here is my youtube channel I created for the motovan!
  12. I didn't sleep the night of August 1st, too much anticipation, too much energy, all pent up like a kid waiting for St. Nick to slide down the chimney and drop off gifts to be played with in the morning. I got out of bed early, there was no sense in delaying it any longer. I went through my routine of brewing coffee, frying a couple eggs and having breakfast as hurriedly as ever. After breakfast I checked my bags for, probably, the 100th time to make sure I had all the gear I could stuff in them and that I hadn't left anything out because I would need it all for the next week. I checked every drawer and under the bed and in the washer and dryer to make sure nothing remained. When I was sure the bags were good to go I made my way down to the garage to begin to load my truck before I had to leave for work. First, I got both bikes in the bed of the truck. I took my 2012 KTM 300XC and 2017 450 SX-F(never take a SX bike to ride CO single track, more on that later). Then came all manner of spare parts, fluids, lubricants, cleaners, tools, anything you can think of that you might need to keep a bike running properly. Off I go to work. I don't have a clue what happened at work that day. All I know is at 5 o'clock I'm leaving and heading to the Airbnb I booked in south GA. It was a hot day and I had been hot all day at work hopped in the truck to leave and about an hour down the road had to pull off at a rest stop and puke, not the best start to my trip, but between the heat and my excitement to get going I got queezy. I got back on the road and had an uneventful rest of the trip to Lake Park. Got in at about 10 and went to bed pretty quickly as I needed to be up early the next day. 5 a.m. came soon enough but I was still rearing to go. I got dressed, had my coffee and headed out before daylight on my way to Columbus, GA. Halfway there I stopped in Tifton, GA to get on Highway 82 and grab some Chick-Fil-A breakfast at exit 62 off I75. Nothing else would suffice. By the time 11 rolled around I made it to a U-haul location and picked up the 6x12 enclosed trailer that we had reserved for the trip because I don't own an enclosed trailer, no one else driving out did and I couldn't find anyone to lend me one. At $30 a day, though, I wasn't really worried about it. *Props to U-Haul btw, that trailer pulled great and had all kinds of tie down points. I would not hesitate to get one again.* After picking up the trailer my next stop for most of the day was Tallassee, AL where I picked up my first comrade and took a driving break to work on bikes. My 450 is a track bike and it typically stays in tip top shape because the track is not the place to have a failure of any sort because it always happens up the face of a jump or in the air. So it didn't need anything at all. My 300 was having clutch issues. To try to remedy this I bought a master cylinder rebuild kit and installed it to no avail, it actually got worse so I put the stock components back in. After I put the rebuild kit in it I COULD NOT get the clutch to take fluid when the lever was actuated so I ended up back bleeding it completely full and it somehow worked. Right then I went online to Rocky Mountain and ordered a new complete clutch master and had it sent to our accommodations in CO. This would prove to be a damn good decision. My friend, Josh, was taking his ragged 1994 Honda CR250R... I had zero faith in that bike. Before we could leave it needed new tubes and tires, and a new clutch pack. I also decided that we should put grease in every place that would take grease to be safe. This guy had been riding about 6 months, never on a motorcycle of any kind before, at the time so I gave him a crash course in how to change tires and tubes. I wasn't sure any of this work would be worth it. If you can imagine the most clapped out 1994 CR250 that actually still runs and moves under its own power; this is that bike, 100 percent. Suspension just feels like its only working on the springs, clutch is on/off, brakes are very much absent, no power band just on or off(later discovered the power valve assembly was stuck open), so so so loud with smoke pouring out of the head pipe connection to the cylinder, EVERYTHING rattles, the kicker only catches 1/3 of the time, but alas the bike works well enough for this particular rider. Anyhow, we clean up and get everything back together and load up in the trailer. Next was to swap trucks with my father for the remainder of the trip. I love my '96 Z71 but I don't love it enough to drive it to Colorado from Alabama, South FL to AL was quite enough. I can't thank him enough for letting us take his truck. That kept us from needing another rental. Hard to believe that out of the 6 riders travelling from Alabama to Colorado none of us have a full size truck or SUV that is cross country worthy. By now, with just the 2 of us, the truck and trailer are loaded down with enough supplies for an army of riders and mechanics. At 7 P.M. we roll out of Tallassee and head to Guntersville, AL for the last leg of the day to meet up with the rest of the guys going with us. We stopped in Birmingham to pick up the 4th bike going in the trailer and roll up to Guntersville around 11 P.M. to meet the last 3 riders. Once there we elect not to put another bike in the trailer and the last 2 will ride in the bed of the 2nd truck going to CO. I can't tell you how great it felt to be back with all the boys, everyone together again. We all met in college at Auburn and have since moved off to Florida, South Carolina, and Tennessee. After catching up over a few beers it was time to head to bed for the night and get a few hours sleep before rolling out early Saturday morning. The next 20 hours of my life are some of the least exciting times I have ever lived through. The three of us riding in my truck, being young and bold, decided that driving straight through the entire day and night to get there before the next morning was the best course of action so off we went leaving the other three riders asleep in the house. Nashville to Paducah and on up to St. Louis and past the great arch. We encountered a classic Lamborghini Countach on the west side of St. Louis; trying to catch up to it loaded down with bikes and gear in a half ton truck was pretty comical. It didn't work. We traveled onward to Columbia then hit KC before sundown. We stopped only for gas, and you basically don't drink because making special stops to take a leak wastes too much time on a trip that long. Once on the west side of KC you have reached the absolute worst part of the trip: Kansas. Nothing about Kansas is cool, at least on I70. I had been awake long enough so it was time for me to pass out so that I would be prepared to co-pilot in case the drive dosed off or I needed to drive the last leg of the trip. I was in and out of sleep through Kansas and I remember sleepily waving to the "Welcome to Colorado" Sign. I came to just before Denver as we were stopping for gas and the current driver was done for the night. Driver number three takes over heading into Denver. We make it through the Mile High City unscathed and up we go over the mountains. I now find out the driver 3 has never driven in the mountains. It's after midnight, and he is pulling a trailer. I can't describe how painfully slow he was driving at this point. Somewhere just after the Eisenhower tunnel we got our first head nod from him so I am wide-ass awake now. After another few miles it happened again and I reached over and took the wheel from the passenger seat and shook him really hard. We pulled over very quickly and I took over. That was one of the scarier points in life. I was wide awake with fear, mostly, at this point. I got us on to Silverthorne fairly quickly and off I70 onto CO Highway 9. We reached Kremmling almost instantly or so it felt. Then I hopped on US 40 to take us into Steamboat Springs. Both of my friends were passed out so I had no choice but to be on point driving and not feel an ounce of tiredness. I was scared to even yawn or sneeze. It's a real shame that we were driving through CO at night, Josh had never seen it, Patrick hadn't been in over a year, and I hadn't seen it since January but that made the morning that much more special. We uneventfully pulled up to Promontory Condominiums about 3 A.M on Sunday August 5th, where two of the riders who live in CO were waiting on us. We unceremoniously went straight to bed. It took me 58 hours to go 2,300 miles from Fort Myers, FL to Steamboat. Not bad!
  13. Hey ThumperTalkers, checkout my latest off-road motorcycle riding video tip on the proper techniques necessary to navigate rutted corners with speed, control, and confidence. Of course, if you have any questions, hit me up in the comment section below and I'll do my best to answer. Please be patient, I'm at the track and events a lot, but I'll do what I can! How would you rate your skills in tackling rutted corners? What's giving you the most trouble? Brian Garrahan http://garrahanoffroadtraining.com/
  14. Looking for a bike for my wife. She is about 12 rides in and has been riding my "old" 2012 350 xcf now for sale. I am riding a TX 300 and loving it. The bottom line is that the 350 xcf is too big, too heavy and too powerful. It's tight ratio, tight gearing and pulls hard, she has trouble standing without whisky throttle. It has seems to have much more hit and power than a 350 xcw or exc. I have ridden many of those. I also want a bike she can grow into a bit. We tried a 230 and some similar bikes but they are heavy and seem a little lacking in some areas and feel like we would be selling it by the end of the summer. So I think we are down to a 2015 KTM Freeride or a 2013 200 xcw both used. I know totally different. Any thoughts, she is a good athlete and mtn biker but still learning the moto. We just ride single track that is semi technical. I don't think she will ever be fast so I don't this the suspension and brakes are a deal killer. I have ridden a few Freeride's and wasn't overly impressed with the brakes and suspension. That being said it's light and lugs and lugs. I just want her to have fun and keep riding. Freeride feels a little more like a novelty where the 200 feels more like a proper moto. I am torn, she is torn. At the end of the day this is a good 1st world problem to have. She aren't many women riders here so it's hard to get feedback. PS She is 5'9" and 135.
  15. MORGANTOWN, WV – June 14, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – MX Sports Pro Racing and Victory Sports have announced the addition of the Cody Gragg Memorial 2-Stroke Race, which will run as part of the Fifth Annual Tennessee National at Blountville, Tennessee’s Muddy Creek Raceway on June 24 for Round 5 of the 2017 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship. Cody was a part of the motocross family from the time he started racing 50cc bikes back in 2000. The recent passing of he and his father, Chris, was a very tragic loss for the entire racing community. Cody enjoyed racing 2-stroke motorcycles, so it is only fitting to honor his memory with a full gate featuring these beloved machines. The Memorial 2-Stroke Race will be open to Pro-Am, A Class, and B Class riders only, and riders with a current pro license will not be permitted to compete. The race will run prior to opening ceremonies of the Tennessee National, between 12 Noon and 12:30 p.m. local time. Practice and a qualifying race for the Memorial 2-Stroke Race will take place on Friday afternoon to determine Saturday’s 40-rider field. An additional practice will take place prior to the event on Saturday. The race will feature a purse, contingencies, and a very special commemorative award for the winner. A holeshot bonus will also be awarded. The purse, which started at $500, has quickly surpassed the $12,000 mark thanks to an array of donations, and will continue to be open to contributions through the actual race. Individuals and businesses can donate to the purse by simply contacting Victory Sports, with winnings paid out to top ten finishers. As the event nears, Victory Sports will provide an update on the total purse, while also providing a list of donors. Entry fee into the Cody Gragg Memorial 2-Stroke Race is $40. For more information on signing up for the race, and to make donations to the purse, please contact Jane Gammon at Victory Sports at jane@victory-sports.com or at (423) 323-5497. Additional information is also available at MuddyCreekRaceway.com. Source: MX Sports Pro Racing, Inc.
  16. hi i have a 2015 crf450 and im doing my own service on them and need help on how to take them apart and how much oil to put back in. also if someone has a video of them doing it would be so helpful
  17. Hey there! I'm looking for a FCR39 to put in my 2016 DRZ400sm. I find it hard to find info on this topic. I want to max out the power on my bike and keep it reliable. I work for a Arctic Cat dealer and i have 3 clients how are looking to do the same on there bikes. can you guys help guide me? thanks
  18. I need to know how much oil and where to change the oil at. I'm thinking it's on the side of the motor. But I'm not sure. I have an 06 crf150f
  19. Tomac Relies on Impressive Come-From-Behind Effort in Final Moto to Take Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Opener at Hangtown Osborne Begins 250 Class Title Chase with Dominant Victory RANCHO CORDOVA, CA – May 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, kicked off its 2017 season on Saturday with the 49th running of the Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic at Prairie City SVRA and a wide-open battle for each respective championship. The first of 12 rounds this summer provided hot temperatures and a huge crowd that witnessed a stellar battle for victory in the 450 Class, from which Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Eli Tomac emerged with a gritty overall win after an impressive come-from-behind effort in the final moto. In the 250 Class, Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Zach Osborne earned the second overall win of his career with a dominant effort, sweeping both motos. Tomac battled through the field to clinch the win with a 1-1 moto sweep. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 450 Class began its first moto of the season with Team Honda HRC’s Christian Craig earning the Motosport.com Holeshot, ahead of Team Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Marvin Musquin and Monster Energy/Yamalube/Chaparral/Yamaha Financial Services/Yamaha Factory Racing rookie Cooper Webb, last year’s 250 Class Champion. Tomac fought his way forward from a start of about seventh to conclude the opening lap in fourth. As he neared the completion of the opening lap Craig crashed out of the lead, allowing Musquin to assume control of the 30-minute-plus-two-lap moto. As that unfolded Tomac surged into second, passing Webb in addition to Craig. From there the race became a two-rider battle. Musquin kept Tomac’s advances at bay for a couple laps, but the Kawasaki rider made an aggressive move at the start of Lap 3 and slipped by on the outside of his KTM counterpart. Musquin made a slight bobble shortly thereafter, which established a separation between the two that would continue to grow. From there the attention focused on the battle for third between Webb and Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Josh Grant, who started fifth. Grant patiently waited for his opportunity to strike and did so on Lap 5. From there the top three remained unchanged through to the finish. Despite a small crash late in the moto that cost him over 10 seconds to Musquin, Tomac still took the win by 15.4 seconds. Musquin (25) and Tomac (3) put on a show for the fans in Moto 2. Photo: Jeff Kardas Tomac had his work cut out for him in the second moto, which saw Grant take the Motosport.com Holeshot ahead of Musquin, RCH/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s Broc Tickle, and Autotrader/Monster Energy/Suzuki/JGRMX’s Justin Barcia. Tomac was outside the top 10 as the field entered the first turn, but managed to claw his way into eighth before the completion of the opening lap. The holeshot allowed Grant to take advantage of the clear track and he set a strong early pace to open a gap on Musquin, while Barcia slotted into third. Behind them Tomac was able to make some early passes to break into the top five and then engaged in a battle with Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Dean Wilson for fourth. Tomac’s patience paid off on Lap 5 as he was able to make the pass on Wilson for fourth. Shortly thereafter he caught Barcia for third and put himself in podium position on the same lap. With Grant in the lead, Musquin in second, and Tomac in third the battle for the overall win was still up for grabs, with Grant in control of his own destiny. After leading the first seven laps of the moto, Grant slowly started to lose ground to Musquin, who picked up his pace following Tomac’s move into third. The lead duo battled for the lead briefly, but Musquin was able to make the pass on Lap 7 and put himself in position to win the overall. Tomac’s charge to the front wasn’t complete, and he quickly disposed of his teammate to move into second on Lap 9. He then closed in onto the rear fender of the leading KTM, producing an incredible battle for the lead that elicited roars from the crowd. Musquin and Tomac jockeyed for the top spot for several laps, with the Frenchman able to counter every one of Tomac’s advances. The leaders continued to trade lines all over the track, coming within inches of making contact with one another on numerous occasions. On Lap 12 Tomac was able to take advantage of a slight bobble by Musquin and make another impressive outside pass. Once in front Tomac quickly opened a lead, eventually crossing the finish line 8.7 seconds ahead of Musquin. Grant followed with a strong third-place effort. With identical moto scores for the lead trio across both motos, Tomac (1-1), Musquin (2-2), and Grant (3-3) completed the overall podium in the same fashion. “There was some good battling today. In the first moto I got into a good groove quickly and made the passes early to go on and win, but the second moto was tough,” said Tomac. “That was a good ole classic battle [with Musquin]. I really had to dig deep and try every line possible to make time up on the leaders. It feels good to get through the first round and leave with the red plate.” Tomac’s perfect scores give him a six-point lead over Musquin in the 450 Class standings, while Grant sits 10 points back in third. Musquin finished second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The opening 250 Class moto saw Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Adam Cianciarulo claim the first Motosport.com Holeshot of the season, with Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Sean Cantrell slotting into second in his pro debut and Osborne settling in third. Osborne applied pressure on the rookie on Lap 1 and moved into second, ultimately setting his sights on Cianciarulo for the lead. The lead pair swapped fast laps throughout the first portion of the 30-minutes-plus-two-laps moto before Osborne was able to eventually get around the Kawasaki and take control of the race. Behind them, Yamalube/Star Racing Yamaha’s Aaron Plessinger fought his way around Cantrell to take over third. Once in the lead Osborne was able to open a comfortable gap that he easily maintained throughout the remainder of the moto, which was further aided by lapped traffic. Plessinger applied pressure on Cianciarulo for several laps, but eventually both riders asserted themselves in the remaining podium spots. Osborne took the third moto win of his career 5.3 seconds ahead of Cianciarulo, with Plessinger following in third. Grant enjoyed his first podium effort since the 2013 season. Photo: Jeff Kardas With the overall win within reach, Osborne took control of Moto 2 immediately out of the gate, grabbing the Motosport.com Holeshot over the Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki duo of Joey Savatgy and Cianciarulo. Savtagy showed impressive early speed and was able to briefly lead the moto, but Osborne got back around on Lap 1 and never looked back. Cianciarulo gave up third place to Plessinger and would soon fall out of contention. The rider to watch in the early stages was Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Alex Martin, who started fifth. Martin was able to surpass both Cianciarulo and Plessinger on Lap 2 and continued his push to the front by passing Savatgy for second on Lap 3, bringing Plessinger along with him into third. Osborne remained in control of the moto throughout, but another rider was on a charge to the front. After starting seventh Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Austin Forkner stormed through the field and broke into podium position on Lap 7 after passing Plessinger. His determination continued and he was able to close in on Martin for second. The KTM rider fended off Forkner for several laps, but gave up the spot on Lap 14 and dropped off the podium after losing another spot to his brother Jeremy, who rides for GEICO Honda, that same lap. Osborne took the win by 2.9 seconds over Forkner, with Jeremy Martin in third. Osborne dominated en route to his second career win. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 1-1 sweep gave Osborne an easy overall victory, the second of his career, while Alex Martin’s consistent 4-4 results were enough to give him the runner-up spot. Plessinger completed the overall podium (3-5) after tying with Martin in points, but losing the tiebreaker based on second-moto results. “It was nice to carry the momentum from supercross and take the pressure off the [start of the] outdoor season, and come out of here with max points,” said Osborne. “This is always one of the roughest tracks we have all year, so you always come in here kind of guessing. It’s good to know we’re leaving with the points lead and a win. My goal was to be in the top five and challenge for a podium, so to come away with a 1-1 is pretty awesome.” Osborne already holds a double-digit lead of 14 points in the 250 Class standings over Martin and Plessinger. Alex Martin’s 4-4 results were good enough for second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 2017 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship continues next Saturday, May 27, with its second round from Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, California. First motos of the FMF Glen Helen National can be seen live on MAVTV at 1 p.m. PT / 4 p.m. ET, while second motos will air live on NBC Sports Network at 3 p.m. PT / 6 p.m. ET. Additionally, all the action can be seen as it unfolds online via the NBC Sports Gold app. Plessinger rounded out the overall podium. Photo: Jeff Kardas Results Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic Prairie City SVRA – Rancho Cordova, Calif. May 20, 2017 450 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki (1-1) Marvin Musquin, France, KTM (2-2) Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki (3-3) Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna (10-4) Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki (7-7) Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM (6-8) Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha (5-9) Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda (4-12) Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki (11-5) Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki (8-10) 450 Class Championship Standings Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki – 50 Marvin Musquin, France, KTM – 44 Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki – 40 Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna – 29 Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki – 28 Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM – 28 Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha – 28 Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda – 27 Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki – 26 Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki – 24 250 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna (1-1) Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM (4-4) Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha (3-5) Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki (2-8) Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki (11-2) Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha (5-6) Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki (7-7) Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki (8-9) Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM (6-12) Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha (9-11) 250 Class Championship Standings Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna – 50 Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM – 36 Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha – 36 Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki – 35 Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki – 32 Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha – 31 Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki – 28 Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki – 25 Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM – 24 Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha – 22 For information about the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, please visit ProMotocross.com and be sure to follow all of the Pro Motocross social media channels for exclusive content and additional information on the latest news: Facebook: @americanmotocross Instagram: @promotocross Twitter: @ProMotocross YouTube: AmericanMotocross Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, features the world’s fastest outdoor motocross racers, racing aboard the best bikes each factory offers, on the roughest, toughest tracks in the world. The 12-rounds series begins at Hangtown in May and ends at Indiana’s Ironman Raceway in August. It includes stops at the premier motocross racing facilities in America, with events in California, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Michigan, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington, New York and Indiana. The pro riders race on Saturday afternoon, with competition divided into two classes: one for 250cc machines, and one for 450cc machines. The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship is managed by MX Sports Pro Racing, the industry leader in off-road power sports event production. The series is televised on NBC, NBCSN and MAVTV and streamed live on NBC Sports Gold Series partners include Lucas Oil (series title sponsor), Red Bull, WPS, Fly Racing, GEICO Motorcycle, MotoSport.com, Garmin, 100%, KTM, FMF, Deltran Battery Tender, Pirelli, Suzuki, Husqvarna, Pivot Works, Vertex, Alpinestars, KMC Wheels, MotionPro, VP Racing Fuels, Acerbis and Racer X. More information can be found at www.ProMotocross.com. Source: Racer Productions, Inc.
  20. Just wanted to share a video I saw recently of some guys riding their two strokes. Videos like this help me get through the winter haha!
  21. Hello, I am new to this forum and certainly new to purchasing bikes. I plan on being a 50/50 rider, half trails and half track. I live in Central Valley, Fresno. I plan to ride a track in Handford, dove springs, Miami trails, and other Sierra National Forrest locations. I am hoping to get some advice on what I should buy. I would really prefer to buy a green sticker, in the past I had a KTM xc-w 450 and loved it, seemed good for both styles of riding. Now that I'm on my own money with buying a bike I'm not interested in spending an extra 2k for KTM. I've been looking at the Kx 450 and CRF 450r. My question is whether or not these models are both red sticker, I've read different things on every page I go to. If both are red sticker, do you guys have any advice on what would be a good option for me? I'm 215, 6'1" and would say I am an intermediate rider. I'd like to stay below 5k. Thanks for any information!
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