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Found 285 results

  1. daled

    Yesterday was a crap day

    so I watched an old MXON just before going to bed... good race, Tadesco lead most of the race and placed third. Ciarolli suffered a turn one crash, but fought through for a top step on the box. Villopoto's run was just a pleasure to watch, every time past the mechanic area, he had the front end up and he used body English to keep the bike true on the super rutted track... that's when I noticed it....the commentator...I want one like him before the outdoors starts... there was no intense diagnostic dialogue about how a rider was feeling or thinking. no comments regarding the last known "tweets" or interview B.S. No breakdown of why rider X made a mistake....It was more like watching with a buddy that's chatty, but not too chatty.... comments like "look at Tony nail that outside rut...that's skill", or Ivan has rode hard this full moto but I think he's getting tired. and at one point the commentator even busted out in a laugh as Purcell crashed.....Epic...
  2. Long-time Yamaha 4-stroke rider/owner/racer...currently ride a new YZ 250 smoker. We all know about the perceptions and realities of the backwards motor/new chassis that Yamaha has offered since 2010. I have ridden the 2013 and current bike (2015) at demo days and like them just fine. Strong motor, all the other Yamaha attributes, and serviceable MX bike for sure. However, the bike has suffered a lot of not-so-good press. We know the bike is wide at the radiators, heavy-feeling, and a large-ish 450. I owned the 2013 YZ 250F and I know that this chassis handled great. My question here is this.....what if Yamaha simply fuel-injected the 2006-2009 motor, tweaked it to brink it in line with power levels needed today, and stuck it into the 2010-2013, and newer, chassis that mimicked the fine 250F chassis? Would they have had a class-winner on their hands? Would it be fast enough? Would it have sold better? What do you guys think?
  3. Did he retire to his safe space after Stewart faded off the radar? Does he need some comfort food?
  4. Hello, I run a rather small Mind of a woman...riding blog. I'm looking to see what kind of stuff you guys would want to read about? I've done a few articles... Why you need to let your husband build a Mx track in the backyard http://www.oldhousefreshstart.com/2017/09/5-reasons-you-need-to-let-your-husband.html And why your husband needs a new bike. http://www.oldhousefreshstart.com/2017/09/5-reasons-why-your-husbandboyfriend.html But im wondering..why other types of stuff? There's not much interest in blog of bike maintenance from a women's point..that's boring right? Whats your opinion? Be nice. :]
  5. Hello good people! I have created a mobile app for us supercross & motocross fans. I didn't like the experience of the website fantasy sites so i built my own. Im slowly sharing it with people and decided this would be a good spot to post. I would love for any and all feedback. There is a form inside the app under the menu. My goal is to create something awesome for us to use. Check it out! PickMX App Details (pickmx.com / instagram / twitter): Create your own public or private group. Join any public group View Live Timing of each race including qualifying times so you can adjust your picks before the heat races start or checkin on the races if your not near a TV. Supercross Seasons & Outdoor Motocross Seasons are enabled. Join in at anytime Weekly Winner
  6. We had a great time at Arkansaw MX. The track was slightly different, and the dirt was awesome. However, the grass has grown up, and if you aren't familiar, there is a dangerously big pit to the left of the second set of whoops. I slid off the track, off to the left of the whoops. I didn't hurry to get back on, it was slippery, I was going to meander back over... when I found the pit. Watch my faceplant here: It's right after the 4 minute mark. Be careful out there!
  7. Kev_XR

    Chad Reed 2018

    Will Reed race as his own team again? Reboot the Cahadapult? MXA has a photo of a YZ250, a Honda and a KTM in his garage. https://motocrossactionmag.com/chad-reed-to-honda-or-ktm-for-2018/
  8. ConnorMoto

    TTR 125 Mods?

    I'm looking to mod out my 2015 TTR 125 but I can't seem to find anything really except for like exhausts, sprockets, rims and obvious stuff like that. If anyone could help me out with some links or just names of stuff that would be great.
  9. Watch in YouTube (portuguese)
  10. TheAirborneCheese

    Virginia Motocross Tracks

    I live in northwest Virginia (Charlottesville area) about an hour south of DC, I am not aware of any tracks in the area that are either public (or private but allow people to ride with permission). Does anyone know of any good tracks in my area? - Airborne
  11. Paul Olesen

    Three Easy Ways to Improve Engine Cooling

    This month I want to discuss three easy ways to improve engine cooling for your dirt bike or ATV and explain why they are effective. As improvements are made to an engine that increase its power, the amount of heat the engine will create will also increase. Effectively removing heat from the engine and cooling it is very important as the power output of the engine goes up. The cooler an engine runs, the more power it can produce. There are three ways that the aftermarket attempts to improve the cooling system of a particular engine. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system. Let's dive in. 1. Increase flow through the cooling system The flow through the cooling system can be increased by installing a water pump impeller designed to increase the flow rate of the coolant. The reason increasing the flow rate of coolant works is because the rate of heat transfer from the engine to the cooling system is directly proportional to the mass flow rate of coolant. This is thermodynamics jargon, but there are two key parts to consider. First, how much coolant is flowing, and second, at what speed the coolant is flowing. The more coolant that flows and the faster it flows will reduce the temperature difference between the point where the coolant enters into the engine and where it exits. This next part is not quite as intuitive. When the temperature difference between the inlet and outlet is reduced, the average coolant temperature is lowered. When the average coolant temperature is lowered the engine will run cooler. This is why fitting a water pump, which increases the flow of coolant through the engine, improves cooling. 2. Increase the cooling capacity of the radiators Radiators consist of a series of tubes and fins which run from the top to the bottom of the radiator. These are often referred to as the radiator’s cores. As coolant enters the radiator it moves through the series of tubes and heat is transferred from the coolant to the fins. Air passes over the fins and heat is transferred from the fins to the air. This transfer of heat from coolant to air is how radiators reduce the temperature of the coolant. Coolant temperatures can be reduced by upgrading radiators in three ways, by increasing the frontal area of the radiators, by making the radiators thicker, or by using materials with better heat transfer properties for the cores. For all practical purposes, increasing the radiators’ frontal area and improving the core materials is rarely a viable option for dirt bike applications. This is because there is little room for the radiators to begin with and they are susceptible to damage, making the use of expensive core materials a risky affair. Unfortunately, both of these options are better improvements to make before resorting to increasing the thickness of the radiators. Increasing the thickness of a radiator is not as efficient of an improvement as increasing the frontal area of the radiator. In order for thicker radiators to cool more effectively than their stock counterparts, airflow past the radiators is key. When the thickness of a radiator is increased, air must travel a greater distance through the radiator before exiting. The speed the air is traveling plays a big role in determining how quickly the air heats up as it moves through the radiator. If the air is not traveling fast enough through the radiator, the air temperature will rise and equal the coolant temperature before reaching the end of the radiator. Once this happens, heat transfer stops and whatever portion of the radiator remains will not help with cooling. In order for a thicker radiator to be effective, air must flow quickly enough through it so that the exiting air temperature is at, or better yet, below the coolant temperature. In conclusion, benefits from adding thicker radiators will be more prominent in applications where speeds are relatively high. Whereas in applications where the bike is hardly moving, improved cooling may not be noticeable. 3. Increase the pressure of the cooling system The last alteration to the cooling system that can be made is to install a high pressure radiator cap. As coolant temperature increases, pressure increases inside the cooling system. The radiator cap is designed to be the pressure release point in the cooling system in the event that too much pressure builds up. This can occur as a result of overheating or a blown head gasket for example. By designing the radiator cap to be the weak link in the system, other parts of the system, such as seals, don’t end up getting damaged from being over pressurized. The radiator cap features a plug and spring on its underside. The spring is designed to compress once a certain pressure is reached, at which point the plug will move upwards and uncover a pressure release hole where excess pressure will be vented. The coolant’s boiling point and ability to conduct heat are necessary factors in understanding why a high pressure radiator cap can help improve engine cooling. Water alone boils at 212°F (100°C) while a 50/50 mix of water and antifreeze boils at 223°F (106.1C). Radiator cap pressure designations are usually advertised in bar, with most stock radiator caps designed to withstand pressures up to 1.1 bar (16psi). The more pressure a fluid is under, the more difficult it becomes for the fluid to vaporize, and the higher its boiling point becomes. When water is under 1.1 bar of pressure, the temperature water will boil at is 260°F (127°C) while a 50/50 antifreeze mix will boil at 271°F (133°C). By installing a radiator cap designed to withstand higher pressures, an additional increase in the coolant’s boiling point will be seen. High pressure caps are usually designed to withstand 1.3 bar (19psi) of pressure. This 0.2 bar (3psi) increase in pressure over the stock system will increase the boiling point of water or antifreeze by 8.7°F (4.83°C). This will then bring the boiling point of pure water or a 50/50 antifreeze mix to approximately 269°F (132°C) and 280°F (138°C) respectively. While this small temperature increase alone won’t do a lot for your engine, coupling a high pressure cap and using coolants with better heat transfer properties can do wonders. Antifreeze (ethylene glycol) alone is not an inherently good conductor of heat. In fact, pure antifreeze conducts heat about half as well as water, while a 50/50 mix of antifreeze and water conducts heat approximately three quarters as efficiently as pure water. This means a cooling system using a 50/50 mix of antifreeze would have to flow faster than a cooling system filled with pure distilled water in order to achieve the same cooling efficiency. What this means for you is significant cooling gains can be made by using distilled water and an additive called “Water Wetter” in place of an antifreeze-water mix. Water Wetter is an additive that improves water’s “wetting” abilities (another whole subject), adds corrosion resistance, and slightly increases the boiling point of water. A high pressure radiator cap in conjunction with distilled water and Water Wetter as the coolant is by far the best route to go for high performance applications where freezing is not an issue. For applications which must still be resistant to freezing, the antifreeze-water ratio can be altered in favor of mixtures incorporating more water than antifreeze so that the cooling efficiency of the mixture is improved. Just bear in mind the freezing point of the mixture as it is thinned with water will be reduced, so you will need to pay close attention to the environment you are operating in so that the coolant is never susceptible to freezing. A frozen coolant system can ruin an engine and makes for a very bad day! I hope you enjoyed this post on three easy ways to improve your engine’s cooling. One more thing before I wrap up! April is Autism Awareness month, and here at DIY Moto Fix we couldn't be more excited to announce that we will be donating 15% of all profits made in April to AutismMX. If you haven't heard of AutismMX, this amazing non-profit brings Autism awareness to the motorcross community. Founder, Matthew Dalton, created this non-profit after finding that motorcross was an amazing way to connect with his autistic son. At DIY Moto Fix this non-profit also touches a chord with us. Our filmmaker and photographer, Kelsey Jorissen, loved dirt biking with her autistic brother throughout their childhood. The Autism MX Project focuses on four areas: Autism MX Day Camps are days for ASD kids and families to have the chance to ride AMX’s little dirt bikes and quads and enjoy the sport of motocross. Team Autism MX Sponsoring amateur MX racers, riders as well as sponsoring AMA pro racers. Through doing so, they are getting out the word on Autism Awareness to millions. AMX Puzzle Piece Apparel from shirts, graphics, goggles, to help stand out and support Autism Awareness. AMX Ride Days for Autism Awareness AMX celebrates Autism Awareness and is a fundraiser for The Autism MX Project. So for the entire month of April - if you buy a book, a video, even a poster - 15% of that purchase will go towards AutismMX and their amazing cause. Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week!
  12. Reeve Harper

    KTM 85 green oil leak

    Hi, my Husqvarna (KTM in disguise) 85 has just sprung an oil leak while it was layed over on it’s left side, the oil was dripping off the bottom of the foot peg and an alarming amount of oil has come out, and the oil seems to have a green tinge to it. Does anyone know what this is? Thanks
  13. I have the dirt bike ramp, that you put in the hitch and lock it. Been using it for a little bit, and didn’t realize it but it looks liken someone hit the screw, the piece connected to the screw won’t unscrew as the screw blocks it. Now I can’t take it out. I’ve tried straightening out the screw with the mallet but couldn’t do it. Any advice?
  14. Time Left: 12 days and 22 hours

    • FOR SALE
    • USED

    Hello! This listing is for my 2007 Honda CRF250R dirt bike. Last winter I spun the rod bearing and just recently finished rebuilding it. Selling to fund new bike. I am currently the second owner. Current registration valid until 2020, pink slip in hand. Fresh parts: -top end kit: Wiseco; forged, moly skirt coated, 12.9:1 comp ratio (new wrist pin, gaskets, etc) -cylinder: new OEM -bottom end kit: Wiseco; (new bearings, seals, etc) -oil pump: new OEM -head studs & nuts: new OEM -fresh oil and filter -all tolerances checked in top end -valves adjusted -carb adjusted Note: *rebuild was done by my dad (master tech at CAT) and I (4th year mechanical engineering student) *has maybe 15 minutes on new parts, IT HAS NOT BEEN PROPERLY BROKEN IN YET *I have email receipts, pics of rebuild, and old parts as proof of rebuild, just ask and I'll show em off Other parts: -90% tread on front and rear tires -excell takasago front wheel -custom aluminum skid plate -wrap around hand guards -spark arrestor -kickstand Feel free to ask for any more specifics or pictures! LOCAL PICK UP ONLY Thanks!

    $3,200.00

    Ontario - US

  15. I'm and intermediate rider who rides very aggressively and on hard, but fast-paced woods/cross-country/harescramble riding. Sometimes I'll do technical, really tight trails, log crossings, and hillclimbs, etc. and I also will ride motocross tracks every once in a while. I currently own a 2008 KTM 250 XC-F with a bigger rear sprocket, FMF exhaust, aftermarket piston, and I typically run high octane fuel. I won't be upgrading for quite a while but I am planning ahead trying to decide what to save up for and all that. I'm sure this forum will also help others in similar situations. I'd like something that can top out faster than my bike but something that can accelerate quickly and have more torque as well. The majority of my riding is very fast-paced woods with hard corners and lots of roots and steep hills as well, so I'd like something that can blow through corners and accelerate quickly. But, I also ride a lot of tight technical trails so I'd like something that's torquey and has explosive, yet controllable power and something I can take over big logs and rocks. I'm fine with a bike that likes to be revved a lot as that's what I do on my 250xcf now. I'm used to four strokes although I'll probably adjust to a two stroke very quickly as I ride constantly. I'm leaning towards a 250 XC or a 350 XC-F although I've heard lots about KTM's 125 and 150 2 strokes, the 450 and 500, the wide ratio "w" models of the cross country bikes, and their respective motocross models just because I know how explosive they are. I understand that this is a lot to ask out of one bike but I'm going to be adding a lot of aftermarket parts to whatever I end up getting if it doesn't already have any. Tell me all about these bikes if any of you guys have ridden them! I'm probably going KTM because I've heard nothing but good things about them but I will still consider any other brands as well. Tell me any aftermarket you had to do, improvements to be done or downfalls of each bike, and all their advantages and things they're better at than the other ones if you've ridden more than one of these. This is more of a harescramble/cross-country racing post, but since some of my races have parts of motocross tracks I'd like to hear how they do on the track. Also, money isn't too huge of a concern with me but I will definitely not be able to get a brand new bike. I will be racing so if it's bigger than a 250 then I'll have to be sure that it can compete with bigger bikes. Thanks, in advance!
  16. Hi All. I have just finished getting my YZ 250 F road legal here in the UK and so I thought I would make a post about it in the hope that it makes someone elses life that little bit easier should they need to do it. There are lots of posts about this on the net but most are outdated already. I will lay this out in steps for ease. These are the steps in which I did it. At this point I will assume you already have a bike and you want to know what to do next. 1. Contact the bike manufacturer. - Yamaha - Kawasaki - Suzuki - Honda - KTM - Give them a call Contact the above bike manufacturer and tell them you have purchased a bike and would like a 'Certificate of Newness'. Each manufactuer charges different money, foe example Yamaha charged me £45 and it took 3 weeks to arrive and my friend has a Kawasaki and they charged him £42 and it arrived the following week. 2. MOT - You can only do this once you have the above certificate in your hand Now after ringing around various MOT bays it become quite clear that this is a bit of grey area. Each testing bay had their own idea on how a "daytime MOT" should be done. These are the things you will need to look out for; - Road legal tyres - They cannot say "not for road use" and should ideallly have an "E" number of some sort on them. - A Horn - Every single testing bay I called required a horn. You can get a strap on horn from eBay for about £20 - Rear Brake Light - Some testing bays told me I needed a rear brake light. In the end I didn't need 1 for my MOT but I fitted one afterwards using a Total Loss System*. - Speedo - I did not need on but if you do get asked for one then you can download a speedo on your phone and attach that to your bike. * For the total loss system I replaced the bango nuts for bango brake switches, added a cheap rear number plate holder with light and added a 10 battery holder pack under the seat then wired it up. If they ask for this then remember it does not have to run off the bike so don't worry about fitting heavy duty stators etc. Each MOT tester is different so phone around and find the easiest way of doing it. 3. NOVA Declaration Now at this point you should have an MOT certificate and a certificate of newness. Before you go any further, check your certificate of newness and if it states that the bike has been added to the NOVA database then you can move onto the next step. If not, then your bike has to be added to the NOVA database. You must do thi, I cannot stress that enough. If you do not have a NOVA reference on your certificate then follow the steps below; - HMRC NOVA - Go to this site. Register or login - DeeperBlue NOVA Walkthrough - This guy, Deeperblue, has a step by step guide on YouTube. Follow this and you should have the bike added easily. It is worth noting that the HMRC will want to see a copy of the reciept for the bike(my friend made me one on a bit of paper as I got it from him) and your certificate of newness. 4. V55/5 At this point you should have been accepted by NOVA, have your valid MOT and your certificate of newness. - Order your V55/5 form here - DeeperBlue V55/5 Walkthrough - This guy, Deeperblue, has a step by step guide on YouTube. Follow this and you should have the form filled in and sent easily. You will need to send a £55 registration fee and money for 1 years tax. You can check the current tax bracket for your bike at https://www.gov.uk/vehicle-tax-rate-tables/other-vehicle-tax-rates Send off all required documents with the above V55/5 along with your cheque or postal order for your tax and registration. 5. Complete If all went well you should have all your documents back in the post along with your new motorbike log book. Now all you need to do is get a number plate made up, get some insurance and have some fun on your bike. If I can help by answering any questions then I gladly will. Big big thank you to DeeperBlue for his help with the videos. Mods/Admins, I hope this post is OK in these forums. There is so much stuff on the internet which is not clear so I wanted to help with that.
  17. After completing a CR125 rebuild and turning a nice little profit, I picked up a 2006 RM125 off Craigslist. The price was a little high at $1800 considering it didn't run but all the other RMs I found looked beat to death. Once I tore the bike down, the good news was the crank was in great shape but the piston looked like it had never been changed. It was barbecued and the cylinder scratched up but luckily no damage the bottom end. The shock and forks need service and the carb had to be rebuilt. The plan is to replate the cylinder, rebuild the suspension, add aftermarket exhaust, Boyesen Rad valve, and then dress it up with new plastic, touch up the frame paint and add graphics. Oh, and get a new seat cover. After removing the plastic and tank, I was pleased to find the frame in great condition. I was able to locate some factory color paint at Colorrite in a spray can. I highly recommend this company. The paint was a perfect match and all I had to do was tape off the bike and a few passes where the color had been rubbed off. I was really pleased with the results. Finished with a clear coat and its like new again. I have been working with 180Decals and they are creating an RM version of the H.E.P. Motosports FXR factory graphic kit for me and Guts offers the 2018 RMZ blue seat cover. I had gone back and forth on graphics but 180Decals crushed it on this design. I wanted to stay with blue and yellow and this fit the bill. More to come soon!
  18. Between riders riding and racing every weekend, a frequent question is how to recover properly. If you have followed me for any period of time, you know that I am an advocate for one day of rest per week and to pull back the overall volume and intensity every six weeks to allow your body to rejuvenate both mentally and physically (at a blood chemistry level). What does that look like? 1. Rest Means Rest: this is not the day to go to a theme park,run errands that have you outside and in the heat and humidity, etc. Anything that is stressful on your body should be avoided. Note doing a sport specific event “easy” is not the idea of a rest day. Instead schedule a massage, read a book, go to a movie or go to lunch with an old friend. 2. Take a Nap: when your body gets into REM (rapid eye movement) level 3, it releases hGH (human growth hormone) which make you both lean and facilitates recovery. Make the room dark and cold, eat a quality snack and consume 5-8 ounces of cold water prior to lying down. 3. Contrast Therapy: the goal here is to expose the muscle tissue to the largest temperature deviation that you can tolerate; the bigger the temperature spread between hot and cold the better. If you complete in the shower, strive for 2 minutes hot – 30 seconds cold. If you utilize a bath, strive for 4 minutes hot, 1 minute cold). Repeat 2 to 4 times. 4. Loosen your muscles up: go for a therapeutic massage or take a yoga class the night prior to your rest day. Spend 20 minutes both in the morning and the evening foam rolling and working on trigger points. Gotta' slow down sometimes to go fast! If you have any questions, comments, or suggestion for a future article, hit me up on the comments section below. I enjoy hearing from you. Oh, and don't forget to tap that "Follow" button so that you're notified when I post new tips on reaching your highest potential. Coach Robb Beams Complete Racing Solutions About Coach Robb
  19. Ride Engineering

    Is Your Handlebar Position Working Against You?

    At Ride Engineering, we pay close attention to handlebar position and bar mount height. You’d be surprised just how much a few millimeters from stock can make to improve your body position and overall control. Keeping the bars neutral is another important aspect. By this we mean keeping the bars parallel to the forks within a few degrees. Drastically changing them by raising the bars 25mm+ or moving them forward that much can have a totally adverse effect. This article’s main focus is to explain where the “sweet spot” is for maximum control reinforcing the proper riding position on track or trail. Handlebars that are rotated too far out of parallel alignment with the forks can create adverse handling issues The first thing that you want to do is pick a handlebar bend that you are comfortable with. Typically, a lower bar will allow you to “muscle” the bike more, but it should still be relative to your height. For example, at my 5’6” stature I like the lowest bends. Currently, my favorite handlebar is the Husqvarna bend Pro Taper Evo. It's 80mm in height at the ends and a little less sweep that my old favorite, the Pro Taper Carmichael. If you’re a bit taller, you may like the SX Race bend with a height of 87mm. Those over 6’, may like the stock Honda bars at 97mm tall (Renthal 971). Since each bike is different, your favorite bar may still need further adjustment. For example, I love the Husky bar on a Husky or KTM with the stock bar height, but on the 2017 CRF450R, I preferred it 5mm lower. On my current 2018 RM-Z450, I prefer them 5mm higher. I tried the SX Race bend with the stock bar mount height, but they felt too tall for me, even though the net difference was only 2mm more. Also, due to my short arms, in every case I run the bar mounts in the back position. This gives me a good head over the bars posture and maximum control of the bike. Incidentally, the forward holes that come on a stock KX-F and YZ-F triple clamps are too far forward for most riders. Before you start shaking your head and tell me that the OEMs wouldn’t design it that way if that were true, let me explain further. Because they use a rubber mounting design, which I agree is way better than the old metal on metal system, they have no choice but to put the forward holes 25-30mm out. The rubber cones are over an inch in diameter, so it’s not physically possible to provide a second mounting position any closer than that. Remember, KTM used to have two positions. But back then it was only a 10mm bolt hole, so it was possible to add a second hole 15mm away. Then by using an offset bar mount you could make changes in 5mm increments. Now that they also offer a rubber cone system, they have eliminated the forward position all together. Ride Engineering bar mounts are typically made the same height as stock (except YZ bar mounts which are the same as the 2017 & older stock mounts and 5mm lower than the 2018) with plus or minus 3mm of adjustability forward or back. We also offer 5mm and 10mm spacer kits to raise our mounts (Ride bar mounts come with posts that unscrew to allow for a height adjustment or to replace in the event they are bent in a crash). Aftermarket bar mounts that are 20 or more millimeters higher that stock are going to put the rider in a less than ideal riding position. Neutrally mounted handlebars Many steering dampers also have this adverse effect. They mount over the stem nut and under the handlebar, so often raising the bar is the only way to make clearance (Ride Eng. offers a damper kit that mounts behind the front number plate, allowing one to keep the bar height standard). Some riders like to go on mellow trail rides for a couple of hours and have found really tall handlebars add comfort. The problem lies when you come across a rider heading in your direction or an unforeseen obstacle that needs an instantaneous reaction. A poor riding posture can contribute to a crash and getting injured. If that happens, any added comfort will be the last thing on your mind. Handlebar mounts w/ spacers Here’s how a few fast guys with a lot of riding experience set up their riding position: Sean Lipanovich Pro 5’5” - 150lb - 27 yrs old Years riding from 12 yrs old to present Slmxschool.com Current ride: 2017 KTM450sxf Sean has raced professional supercross and motorcross, finished in the top 25 at the 2016 USGP, won the 25+ class at the 2017 Vet World championships and now trains young riders for SL MX School. He’s always couching riders to “put your head over the bars, squeeze the bike with your knees and be on the balls of your feet.” “I run the stock KTM handlebars (78mm tall) in the back position (bar mounts rotated back) with the Ride Eng. bar mount that is the same height as stock with the bars neutral (not rotated forward or back) to the forks. I feel this gives me the most control of the bike to get on the gas harder.” Kris Keefer Pro 6’ – 170lbs – 40 yrs old Years riding from 9 yrs old to present Keeferinctesting.com Favorite bike: 2018 YZ450F At 24 years old, Kris started his testing career with Yamaha Motor Corporation which led him to a position at Dirt Rider magazine as associate editor, then eventually to Senior Test editor. Today he’s doing his own testing and pod casts as a new business owner for keeferinctesting.com. Throughout his career he’s raced professional motocross and supercross, the Canadian nationals, Vet World and Loretta Lynn’s. “I use the SX Race bend on my YZ450F with last year’s bar mounts (5mm lower) in the back hole with the mounts rotated forward. I like to keep the bars fairly neutral and coach others to do the same. If you have your bars rotated too far back, it’s harder to get your weight forward on the bike when entering corners. If you have them rotated too far forward where the ends are pointing up, you don’t have the right leverage to initiate the turn.” Ted Campbell Pro 6’ – 210lbs – 42 yrs old Years riding from 12yrs old to present Current bike: 2017 CRF450R Ted has traveled the world racing professional supercross and motorcross and has made many lifelong friends because of dirt bikes. He obtained his first pro national number in 1999 and kept a top 100 number for 6-7 years of his professional racing career. “I use the Mika Metal’s RC bend (this is a tall bar at 105mm), and like to set up my bike with my bars just behind the forks (bar mounts rotated back) in the neutral position so I can get over the front of the bike. I feel I have more control turning and it puts me more in the attack position. I run my bars back further than most being 6’ tall but it gives me the ability to really feel comfortable turning and leaning the bike over as I’m on top of the bars more.” Ted added a set of Ride Eng. CRf triple clamps which did lower the bar position 5mm and moved it 3mm forward from stock. Cody Webb Pro 6’ 3” – 185lbs – 29 yrs old Years riding from 3yrs old to present https://www.facebook.com/codywebb247/ Current bike: 2017 350EXC Cody is the 2010 AMA National Trials champion, 2014 and 2017 AMA Endurocross champion and has finished on the podium or won numerous other off-road races like the 2017 Erzberg Rodeo where he finished in 3rd place. “I run the PHDS bar mount system (these have +/- 5mm of adjustability) with the Renthal 996 handlebars (93mm tall) on Neken triple clamps with no added bar risers although sometimes I hit my knees on the bars. We place the bar mount in the forward hole (these have two 10mm holes for adjustment) with the bar mounts rotated back. If I have the stock clamps on my practice bike, I run the mounts in the forward position. I also like the bars just a hair rolled back from the neutral position.” Cody’s race results speak for themselves and his “average Joe” set up works great even for a guy 6’3” tall (he only raised his bars 15mm from the stock height). I hope this helps everyone understand regardless of your stature, you shouldn’t increase your bar height or move the bars forward too drastically. Small increments of 5mm is ideal. In many cases such as mine lowering the bars will be far more beneficial in reinforcing proper riding posture, getting your head over the bars and maintaining optimal control of your dirt bike. Happy riding. Adrian Ciomo President Ride-engineering.com Vet Int. 5’6” - 150lb - 53 yrs old Years riding from 14 yrs old to present Current ride: 2018 RMZ450 About Ride Engineering Ride Engineering Inc designs and manufactures the highest quality billet aluminum accessories to improve the performance of motocross and off-road motorcycles specializing in handling and braking components. The company combines hands on testing with feedback from past and present professional race teams to bring products to the average customer that are typically not available for sale. Located in Southern California, all Ride Engineering products are made in the USA. For more information on the company visit: http://www.ride-engineering.com/about.php
  20. Paul Olesen

    Checking and Setting Cam Timing

    Today I'm going to cover how to check and set cam timing, which is something you can do if you have adjustable cam gears in your engine. This is a procedure often performed by race engine builders to ensure the valvetrain performs just as they intend, and ultimately so that they extract the desired performance out of the engine. Adjustable cam gears typically aren't a stock option but are abundantly available in the aftermarket. The following text is exerted from my book, The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook, so if you find this info valuable please take a look at the entire book. Degreeing the camshafts is the process of checking, and if necessary altering, the cam timing so that the timing is set perfectly to specified timing values. On stock and performance engines, cam timing can be off slightly due to manufacturing variations in parts such as the camshafts, cam gears, cam chain, cylinder, cylinder head, crankshaft, crankcase, and gaskets. With so many parts having an influence on cam timing, it is necessary to adjust and correct the timing so it coincides precisely with the desired timing values. The biggest factor determining how the camshafts must be timed is whether the cam lobes are symmetrical or asymmetrical. Camshaft lobes that are symmetrical have opening and closing ramps that share the same profile. Asymmetrical cam lobes have opening and closing ramps with different profiles. Symmetric and asymmetric camshafts are timed differently. First we will focus on the timing of symmetrical camshafts. Symmetric camshafts are timed most accurately by determining the position of the camshaft’s lobe center in relation to crankshaft position. A camshaft’s lobe center is where peak lift occurs, which is the most important timing event of the camshaft. Since the tip of the camshaft is rounded, it would be difficult to determine the lobe center by taking a direct measurement of peak valve lift. The opening and closing points of the camshaft are also of little use because the cam opens and closes gradually. This makes it difficult to determine the precise position in which the camshaft opens or closes the valves. The lobe center position is a calculated value based on the position of the camshaft at two specific points of valve lift, typically with valve clearances set to zero. Normally the position of the camshaft is recorded at 0.050” (1.27mm) of lift as the valve opens and 0.050” (1.27mm) of lift when the valve closes. By recording the position of the camshaft at a specific valve lifts, the cam lobe is on a predictable portion of the opening and closing ramps. The center of the cam lobe is exactly in the middle of these two measurements. To calculate the lobe center of a symmetrical cam lobe you will need to do the following: 1. Add the measured opening and closing timings together 2. Add 180 degrees to the sum 3. Divide the answer by 2 4. Subtract the smaller value of the two opening and closing numbers from the answer to reach the lobe center value. Once the actual lobe center value has been determined on the engine, it can be compared to the specified lobe center timing presented by the manufacturer, aftermarket cam supplier, or the engine tuner. If the measured lobe center position coincides with the targeted position, all the work is done. If not, the cam gear will need to be adjusted so the timing is corrected. If you are checking the timing on stock cams and lobe center information isn't presented, you will need to determine the lobe centers the manufacturer recommends. To do this, the opening and closing timing information supplied in the service manual can be used. Aftermarket camshafts should come with a timing card full of useful information to set the cams correctly if they are adjustable, otherwise the lobe centerline can be calculated if the opening and closing timings are known. If you don’t like math, there are plenty of lobe center calculators available on the internet you can use. For the Kawasaki KX250F engine with the stock camshafts, the timing information is as follows: Intake Opens 40° BTDC (Before Top Dead Center) Intake Closes 72° ATDC (After Top Dead Center) Intake Lobe Center = ((40 + 72 + 180) ÷ 2) - 40 = 106° My calculated lobe center timing is 106°. When I check the cam timing, this will be the value the real engine hopefully yields. The lobe center for the exhaust cam can be found the same way. For the KX250F exhaust cam: Exhaust Opens 69° BBDC (Before Bottom Dead Center) Exhaust Closes 49° ATDC (After Top Dead Center) Exhaust Lobe Center = ((69 + 49 + 180) ÷ 2) - 49 = 100° Something not obvious I want to touch on is that if the intake opens after top dead center, a negative value for the opening should be used. If the exhaust closes before top dead center, a negative value should be used here as well. To start the process of checking the timing the valve clearances should be set to zero. Thicker shims can be used and zero clearance can be confirmed with a lash gauge. A degree wheel and pointer will need to be installed on the engine. There are many ways of attaching these items and each engine will provide its own challenges. Here I’ve left the flywheel on and installed a couple washers behind the degree wheel to space the degree wheel from the flywheel. Then the flywheel nut is used to secure the degree wheel. The pointer can be made from welding rod, a coat hanger, or anything else you can find. I’ll be finding TDC with the cylinder head installed, so I used one of the exterior head bolts to secure the pointer. If you will be finding TDC with the head off, choose another location. Before the cams can be timed, TDC must be found. This can be done with the cylinder head on or off depending on the process you use. The piston dwells a few degrees at TDC so more accuracy than zeroing the degree wheel to the piston’s highest position is necessary. Similar to finding the cam lobe center, TDC can be found by measuring equal distances on the piston’s up and down stroke and then confirming that the degree wheel timing is equal on both sides at the measured distances. Dial indicators or piston stoppers are commonly used to do this. HOT TIP: Piston stoppers can easily be made by removing the center section of a spark plug and then tapping a suitably sized threaded hole in the remaining part of the plug so a bolt and lock nut can be installed. The stopper can then be easily threaded into the spark plug hole. Whichever method of finding TDC you decide to use, start by moving the crankshaft to the approximate TDC position. Then without rotating the crankshaft move the degree wheel so that TDC on the wheel coincides with the pointer. Next, set up your piston stops or measure piston travel on both sides of TDC. In this example I’m using a dial indicator which extends through the spark plug hole down into the cylinder. I’ve decided to take measurements at 0.050” (1.27mm) of piston travel before and after TDC. At each measurement point the number of degrees indicated on the degree wheel before and after TDC should be the same if I have found true TDC. If the degree wheel values don’t read the same before and after TDC determine which way the wheel must be rotated so that the values become equal. Then carefully rotate the degree wheel without rotating the crankshaft to alter the degree wheel’s position. Once altered, recheck and confirm that true TDC has been found. This can be a tedious process but is extremely important for checking cam timing accurately. Repeat the procedure for checking TDC 3 - 5 times to ensure repeatability and accuracy. After true TDC has been found, be extremely careful not to inadvertently move the degree wheel or pointer. Do not rotate the crankshaft using the nut securing the degree wheel to the crankshaft. Instead, use the primary drive gear nut or bolt to rotate the engine over. Next, set up a dial indicator on the intake or exhaust lifter bucket, depending on which camshaft you are checking. You’ll have to use some ingenuity here in determining the best way to secure the dial indicator to the engine. I’ve used a flat piece of steel and secured it to the cam cap using the cylinder head cover holes. Make sure the indicator travels as parallel to the path of valve travel as possible for accurate readings. Also makes sure at least 0.060” (1.52mm) of travel from the indicator’s resting position is possible so adequate valve lift can be measured. Once the indicator has been set up, the cam timing can be checked. Whenever checking timing only rotate the engine over in the direction of engine rotation. Reversing engine rotation will result in inaccurate measurements due to the reversal of gear meshes and chain slack. If you miss a measurement point, rotate the engine over until you get back to the previous position. Slowly rotate the engine over until 0.050” (1.27mm) of valve lift has occurred. Then record the position of the degree wheel. Next, rotate the engine until the cam begins to close the valve. Once only 0.050” of indicated valve lift remains record the position of the degree wheel. Repeat this process of checking opening and closing positions 3 - 5 times to check for repeatability before calculating the cam lobe center. Once you are confident in your measurements proceed to calculate the cam lobe center. On the KX250F engine my intake lobe center is as follows: Measured Intake Open (0.050” Lift) 39 ° BTDC Measured Intake Closure (0.050” Lift) 74 ° ABDC Intake Lobe Center = (( 39 + 74 + 180 ) ÷ 2 ) - 39 = 107.5° On my stock KX250F engine the actual lobe center is 107.5°. At this point if I had adjustable cam gears, I could rotate the gear slightly so that the lobe center corresponded to the specified lobe center value. The same procedure is followed for checking and adjusting the exhaust cam timing. Remember if mistakes are made when setting cam timing big problems can result, so it is best to be very patient and focused when performing this task. Always check your work 3 - 5 times to make sure the timing is repeatable and making sense. When tightening adjustable cam sprockets, use a locking agent and be sure to torque the bolts to their specified values. When working with single camshafts that have both the intake and exhaust lobes ground on them, focus your efforts on achieving correct intake timing. Correctly setting intake timing is more important since it has a larger effect on power. The intake valves also have higher lift than the exhaust valves, potentially creating clearance troubles between the piston and valve if the intake valves are mistimed. With your new fangled ability to adjust cam timing, you may be wondering what happens if you advance or retard the intake and exhaust cams from their standard positions? The lobe separation angle refers to the number of degrees which separate the lobe center of the intake lobe from the lobe center of the exhaust camshaft. The lobe separation angle can be calculated using the following formula: LSA = (Intake Centerline + Exhaust Centerline) ÷ 2 As a rule of thumb, reducing the lobe separation angle by advancing the intake and retarding the exhaust camshaft will increase valve overlap, move power further up the power curve, increase cylinder pressure, increase the chance of detonation, and reduce the piston to valve clearances. On the contrary, increasing the lobe separation angle by retarding the intake cam and advancing the exhaust cam will have somewhat of the opposite effect. There will be less valve overlap, power will move to a lower RPM, chances of detonation will be reduced, and the valve to piston clearances will increase. The likelihood of finding more or better power by advancing or retarding the camshafts is not all that likely because manufacturers, tuners, and aftermarket companies already test specific combinations of cam timings to death. In addition, if the lobe separation angle is reduced, the piston to valve clearances should be checked to ensure they are adequate. My advice is to run the prescribed cam timings to reduce the chance of problems occurring. Asymmetric camshaft timing can be set in a similar fashion to symmetric camshafts, however instead of focusing on the lobe center position, the specific opening and closing points will need to be measured. Timing cards supplied with asymmetric cams should have specific instructions for setting timing, but normally valve clearance is set to zero and cam positions are recorded at specific lift heights. Based on the measured opening and closing positions, adjustments are made to the timing until the timing matches the specified values. I hope you enjoyed this exert on checking and adjusting cam timing. As always feedback is appreciated so please leave comments below. If you're interested in more engine building info check out my book The Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. Right now we are having a 4th of July Sale where everything on our site is 20% off with the discount code fourthofjuly2017. Just be sure to enter the code upon checkout so you receive your 20% off! So if you've had your eye on our Four Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook or even our Value Pack, but haven't pulled the trigger yet - go for it! Availabe at: DIYMotoFix.com - Paul
  21. Growing up, seeing motovans at the track was possibly one of the coolest things.. while I was sleeping in my singlecab pickup. But hey, at the time, in highschool, my truck was cooler than some van. Now at this "age" 24... a van is quite a dang good idea, so I started looking. After a few facebook pots, a buddy of mine knew someone who had a 2001 E350 Passenger van sitting, and would get me a price. he told me it needed a radiator, and the spark plug blew out of cylinder 4 (common 5.4 triton issue). A few days go by, and he calls saying I can have it for FREE! they just needed it gone! So, I go out there with a friend of mine who has a 30ft gooseneck, and some starting fluid to make sure I don't get in too deep... we cant get it to fire without starting fluid, and ruled it out to a fuel pump. We pull the van on the trailer, stop by the parts store, and are headed home. The van was sitting stationary for 4 years... and smelled like it. but we'll get back there.. We dropped the tank, having to cut one of the tank straps and emptied the 4 year old fuel, put a new fuel pump in it, about 5 gallons of premium race fuel (fast and furious), and she fired up. Next was the spark plug issue, I tapped the threads, and installed a helicoil along with new plug and coil pack, and we were good. Later I replaced the radiator after flushing the coolant system. The next day, we pulled out everything behind the first row bench seats, to include the headliner, rear AC duct, and side panels. Had to cut out the old seat belt mounts, and reinstalled the last bench where the first bench originally resided, since it was longer, but a few inches back to have optimal leg room. Then came the wall install... after lots of measuring once and cutting twice... I got it all figured out, and had the wall installed, then yellow stuffed "expanding foam" around all sides to ensure I wouldn't have fuel fumes in the cab. Finally I installed some flooring, just to give the bare metal some protection. After that, I was king of burned out on the van, before I even used it. She sat in my driveway for months before I was ticketed for having an unregistered vehicle parked outside.. gotta love florida.. I posted it forsale for a few days, then decided I would getRdone. So, off to the DMV, registered, and custom plates reading "MOTOVAN". Picked up a heavy duty cargo lock, fuel treatment, tons of black ice "little trees", and some R-134 to recharge the AC. She was making her first trip to the track that weekend! We changed the oil, 1,000 miles and 3 years overdue... only 2qts came out.. and sea foamed the green monster. After driving all over town, I parked in the driveway for a second, only to try to move it, and nothing on start up... not even after a jump.. so back to the parts store for a starter. After one of the worst starter jobs ever, she was cranking again. I figured we were problem free... but not before a brake line failed, and had to replace that guy, in order to take her to the track in 2 days! Finally! we were all clear, and we loaded three bikes into the van, and we were off! Two bikes is preferred.. but three worked, juts had to put most of the gear in the cab. Was a great day of riding, before a buddy crashed and ended the day with a concussion and a few compressed vertebrae.. The van made another trip out this past weekend, and developed a new misfire, that ill be taking care of this week, and rechargeing the whole AC system since ill be sleeping in it this weekend for my first race in years! I will add some photos off my phone in a bit, until then, here is my youtube channel I created for the motovan!
  22. So...been riding/racing since 1984, still mostly fit and doing MX track days at 53...love the sport. I raced the 250Fs a dozen years ago and know all the benefits that they offer, and while I love my current 2014 YZ 250 smoker, I get arm pump very quickly and cannot do multiple laps at speed, prompting me to move back to a 4-stroke. I can get a new RMZ 250 for a sweet price but would like to hear a few thoughts on how this bike might compare to 250Fs I have owned/raced...those being the 2003 Yamaha and 2007 Suzuki, or even the last carbed bike, the 2013 YZ-F 250. I am an experienced, but somewhat mediocre C-class guy and want a reliable bike for track days. If you have knowledge here, please feel free to offer up you thoughts. How does the new bike compare to these older bikes??
  23. MORGANTOWN, WV – June 14, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – MX Sports Pro Racing and Victory Sports have announced the addition of the Cody Gragg Memorial 2-Stroke Race, which will run as part of the Fifth Annual Tennessee National at Blountville, Tennessee’s Muddy Creek Raceway on June 24 for Round 5 of the 2017 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship. Cody was a part of the motocross family from the time he started racing 50cc bikes back in 2000. The recent passing of he and his father, Chris, was a very tragic loss for the entire racing community. Cody enjoyed racing 2-stroke motorcycles, so it is only fitting to honor his memory with a full gate featuring these beloved machines. The Memorial 2-Stroke Race will be open to Pro-Am, A Class, and B Class riders only, and riders with a current pro license will not be permitted to compete. The race will run prior to opening ceremonies of the Tennessee National, between 12 Noon and 12:30 p.m. local time. Practice and a qualifying race for the Memorial 2-Stroke Race will take place on Friday afternoon to determine Saturday’s 40-rider field. An additional practice will take place prior to the event on Saturday. The race will feature a purse, contingencies, and a very special commemorative award for the winner. A holeshot bonus will also be awarded. The purse, which started at $500, has quickly surpassed the $12,000 mark thanks to an array of donations, and will continue to be open to contributions through the actual race. Individuals and businesses can donate to the purse by simply contacting Victory Sports, with winnings paid out to top ten finishers. As the event nears, Victory Sports will provide an update on the total purse, while also providing a list of donors. Entry fee into the Cody Gragg Memorial 2-Stroke Race is $40. For more information on signing up for the race, and to make donations to the purse, please contact Jane Gammon at Victory Sports at jane@victory-sports.com or at (423) 323-5497. Additional information is also available at MuddyCreekRaceway.com. Source: MX Sports Pro Racing, Inc.
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