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Found 85 results

  1. SuperMotoFreek

    FCR 39 mm for the Canadiens

    Hey there! I'm looking for a FCR39 to put in my 2016 DRZ400sm. I find it hard to find info on this topic. I want to max out the power on my bike and keep it reliable. I work for a Arctic Cat dealer and i have 3 clients how are looking to do the same on there bikes. can you guys help guide me? thanks
  2. I've just picked up this FCR MX 39 - hoping to fit it to my 2008 DRZ 400 SM. The PO tells me this came from a WR 426. I've trawled the forums here and that's answered a lot of my questions, but hoping someone can help me with a few unknowns... - the PO cleaned the carb in an ultrasonic tank. I'm not keen on these unless I know what cleaner was used - which I don't, so I'm planning on replacing all gaskets. Should I split the carb and replace the mid gasket? These are available from several sources including James Dean. A number of posters suggest this shouldn't be done... - The choke and hot start assemblies were fitted in the wrong positions (swapped over) I've corrected this, but neither knob will stay out on its detent (spring straight back in). Is that likely to be damage caused by the incorrect fitting, or just worn assemblies? - See the pic with the arrow I've drawn. (1.JPG) on other carbs I've seen this vent has a T-piece to which 2 vents are connected. My carb only has the one vent outlet here, but there is another vent out about 3 inches below it (below the coast enricher) which I haven't seen on other FCRs. No vent tubes came with the carb, so I'm guessing 1 tube on each? - Consensus is that it's better to remove the coast enricher. Is this simply removing the 2 screws and dumping the cover and the bits beneath it? Any holes need sealing? - Can the TPS be plugged straight into the DRZ loom? Any other suggestions welcome. I'm not a mechanic so talk to me in simple terms Ta
  3. For 2018, the Monster Energy Supercross starting gate goes from dirt to a steel grate starting pad. Watch how this new system tests a rider’s technique at the most critical moment in a race.
  4. September 20, 2017 Motor Sports Newswire PICKERINGTON, OH – September 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – The American Motorcyclist Association has announced the professional competition numbers for pro-licensed riders competing in Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, and the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship for the 2018 season. All riders use the assigned professional number for competition. In addition, the current champion runs the No. 1 plate instead of an assigned professional number when competing in the class or region in which the No. 1 plate was earned. When competing in a class other than the class where the championship was earned, the rider must use the assigned professional number. 2018 Top 100 and Career Pro Numbers for AMA Supercross and Motocross * Career Numbers ** New Career Number for 2018 About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders’ interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com. Not a member? Join the AMA today. Source: American Motorcyclist Association
  5. Hey guys, I am really needing some good advice here from anybody who has ever owned or rebuilt classic Yamaha 2 strokes (1989 - 1994). I live in South Africa, and bought a little farm thumper while on holiday this past weekend. It was advertised as a DT175 which is a bike that is easy to get parts for down here. It has been cosmetically customized and looks pretty darn cool... and lets face it, all the old classic Yamaha 2T engines look the same at a glance! So I genuinely thought it was a naked DT. The bike had no papers, and was used purely for the farmer to putt around on his farm. The only things needing attention was the stator cover which had snapped in half - this was visibly noticeable, and a little leak from a badly resealed gasket (both generally easy and cheap to fix here). The bike was still running and idling fine, started first kick, and I had a little ride around the farm before loading the bike up onto my pickup and heading off, thinking I could fix this thing up nicely in no time for next to nothing, and have what we call down in SA "a nuwe speelgoed" (A new plaything) for the weekends when I am not riding my beloved and reliable DRZ400SM. SO, I get home and decide to contact our local Yamaha branch, out of interest, to find out the history of the bike before I start fiddling (Don't ask me why I did not do this all before I bought the bike - It was a spur of the moment purchase, and was sold to me for dirt cheap!). I send off the VIN and engine number. Comes back, and this little freakin' turd turns out to be a 1989 TDR180!! WHAT. But now I am stuck as we do not really have TDR's down here - and I have never even seen one myself. Long story short - What alternative could I use as a stator cover? Do any other old Yamaha 2T model stator covers fit the TDR or share similar engine parts? Ordering from Ebay is so expensive thanks to my country being in junk status due to a junk president. So the shipping costs more than the actual item does, and our customs is a joke too. Yamaha has also advised me that this stator cover has been discontinued. I have put up local ads looking for parts, contacted FB 2T groups, and local shops. Nothing for TDR's has come back yet. Any advice or sharing of experience is welcome!
  6. Frequently I discuss the importance of proper hydration and nutrition as it relates to building and repairing muscle tissue, burning unwanted body fat and consuming enough water, sugar and electrolytes to perform optimally every day when you head out the door. With this in mind, I want you to begin keeping a very detailed analysis of your sweat rate. Nutrition as it relates to performance is an interesting subject; we look at the quality and quantity of your food intake and evaluate if you have enough energy to finish your workouts feeling strong throughout the duration of the workout. If you begin to fatigue, we know that we need to adjust the quantity (we assume that the quality is there at this point). Now let’s take a detailed look at your hydration as it relates to your performance. Proper hydration is going to affect your body in two ways: one, it helps you regulate your core body temperature. The cooler you are from the inside out, the better you will perform. The second benefit to proper hydration is that your muscles (and brain) are receiving enough water, electrolytes and sugar to perform properly: good mental clarity and strong muscle contractions. To improve your confidence on race day, you need to know what your sweat/replenishment rate is specific to your intensity with the factor of temperature & humidity. Though it sounds tedious during the week, it is invaluable on race day – you will know exactly what your hydration strategy to implement to race up to your fullest potential. Until next time, work smart - not hard! -Coach Robb
  7. Cameron Moakler

    4 Stroke Beginners Bike

    Hi, Im 15 years old and 110 lbs. Im looking to buy a dirt bike as i have ridden quads/ATVs since I was 8. Budget isnt really an issue just looking for suggestions I hate the power delivery of a two stroke as i have ridden my friends KTM SX 125, and i definitely prefer the sound of a four stroke! Looking for a 125 or 150, whichever you guys think is best for me Thanks!
  8. DiamondBenz

    Chicago area riders... help

    Hi everyone... are there any Chicago areas riders that can help with getting into riding dirt please??? Where are the tracks? Private? Outdoor? Indoor? Even people to ride with? I have about 2 months to decide if it’s worth getting a dirt bike or go with a motard or something. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  9. hello guys, i just saw the new helmet from scott and it looks amazing, but i couldn't find nowhere what the weight of it would be has anybody bought this helmet, what is your thoughts on it? and maybe someone weighted it. thanks
  10. Tomac Relies on Impressive Come-From-Behind Effort in Final Moto to Take Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Opener at Hangtown Osborne Begins 250 Class Title Chase with Dominant Victory RANCHO CORDOVA, CA – May 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, kicked off its 2017 season on Saturday with the 49th running of the Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic at Prairie City SVRA and a wide-open battle for each respective championship. The first of 12 rounds this summer provided hot temperatures and a huge crowd that witnessed a stellar battle for victory in the 450 Class, from which Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Eli Tomac emerged with a gritty overall win after an impressive come-from-behind effort in the final moto. In the 250 Class, Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Zach Osborne earned the second overall win of his career with a dominant effort, sweeping both motos. Tomac battled through the field to clinch the win with a 1-1 moto sweep. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 450 Class began its first moto of the season with Team Honda HRC’s Christian Craig earning the Motosport.com Holeshot, ahead of Team Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Marvin Musquin and Monster Energy/Yamalube/Chaparral/Yamaha Financial Services/Yamaha Factory Racing rookie Cooper Webb, last year’s 250 Class Champion. Tomac fought his way forward from a start of about seventh to conclude the opening lap in fourth. As he neared the completion of the opening lap Craig crashed out of the lead, allowing Musquin to assume control of the 30-minute-plus-two-lap moto. As that unfolded Tomac surged into second, passing Webb in addition to Craig. From there the race became a two-rider battle. Musquin kept Tomac’s advances at bay for a couple laps, but the Kawasaki rider made an aggressive move at the start of Lap 3 and slipped by on the outside of his KTM counterpart. Musquin made a slight bobble shortly thereafter, which established a separation between the two that would continue to grow. From there the attention focused on the battle for third between Webb and Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Josh Grant, who started fifth. Grant patiently waited for his opportunity to strike and did so on Lap 5. From there the top three remained unchanged through to the finish. Despite a small crash late in the moto that cost him over 10 seconds to Musquin, Tomac still took the win by 15.4 seconds. Musquin (25) and Tomac (3) put on a show for the fans in Moto 2. Photo: Jeff Kardas Tomac had his work cut out for him in the second moto, which saw Grant take the Motosport.com Holeshot ahead of Musquin, RCH/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s Broc Tickle, and Autotrader/Monster Energy/Suzuki/JGRMX’s Justin Barcia. Tomac was outside the top 10 as the field entered the first turn, but managed to claw his way into eighth before the completion of the opening lap. The holeshot allowed Grant to take advantage of the clear track and he set a strong early pace to open a gap on Musquin, while Barcia slotted into third. Behind them Tomac was able to make some early passes to break into the top five and then engaged in a battle with Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Dean Wilson for fourth. Tomac’s patience paid off on Lap 5 as he was able to make the pass on Wilson for fourth. Shortly thereafter he caught Barcia for third and put himself in podium position on the same lap. With Grant in the lead, Musquin in second, and Tomac in third the battle for the overall win was still up for grabs, with Grant in control of his own destiny. After leading the first seven laps of the moto, Grant slowly started to lose ground to Musquin, who picked up his pace following Tomac’s move into third. The lead duo battled for the lead briefly, but Musquin was able to make the pass on Lap 7 and put himself in position to win the overall. Tomac’s charge to the front wasn’t complete, and he quickly disposed of his teammate to move into second on Lap 9. He then closed in onto the rear fender of the leading KTM, producing an incredible battle for the lead that elicited roars from the crowd. Musquin and Tomac jockeyed for the top spot for several laps, with the Frenchman able to counter every one of Tomac’s advances. The leaders continued to trade lines all over the track, coming within inches of making contact with one another on numerous occasions. On Lap 12 Tomac was able to take advantage of a slight bobble by Musquin and make another impressive outside pass. Once in front Tomac quickly opened a lead, eventually crossing the finish line 8.7 seconds ahead of Musquin. Grant followed with a strong third-place effort. With identical moto scores for the lead trio across both motos, Tomac (1-1), Musquin (2-2), and Grant (3-3) completed the overall podium in the same fashion. “There was some good battling today. In the first moto I got into a good groove quickly and made the passes early to go on and win, but the second moto was tough,” said Tomac. “That was a good ole classic battle [with Musquin]. I really had to dig deep and try every line possible to make time up on the leaders. It feels good to get through the first round and leave with the red plate.” Tomac’s perfect scores give him a six-point lead over Musquin in the 450 Class standings, while Grant sits 10 points back in third. Musquin finished second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The opening 250 Class moto saw Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Adam Cianciarulo claim the first Motosport.com Holeshot of the season, with Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Sean Cantrell slotting into second in his pro debut and Osborne settling in third. Osborne applied pressure on the rookie on Lap 1 and moved into second, ultimately setting his sights on Cianciarulo for the lead. The lead pair swapped fast laps throughout the first portion of the 30-minutes-plus-two-laps moto before Osborne was able to eventually get around the Kawasaki and take control of the race. Behind them, Yamalube/Star Racing Yamaha’s Aaron Plessinger fought his way around Cantrell to take over third. Once in the lead Osborne was able to open a comfortable gap that he easily maintained throughout the remainder of the moto, which was further aided by lapped traffic. Plessinger applied pressure on Cianciarulo for several laps, but eventually both riders asserted themselves in the remaining podium spots. Osborne took the third moto win of his career 5.3 seconds ahead of Cianciarulo, with Plessinger following in third. Grant enjoyed his first podium effort since the 2013 season. Photo: Jeff Kardas With the overall win within reach, Osborne took control of Moto 2 immediately out of the gate, grabbing the Motosport.com Holeshot over the Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki duo of Joey Savatgy and Cianciarulo. Savtagy showed impressive early speed and was able to briefly lead the moto, but Osborne got back around on Lap 1 and never looked back. Cianciarulo gave up third place to Plessinger and would soon fall out of contention. The rider to watch in the early stages was Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Alex Martin, who started fifth. Martin was able to surpass both Cianciarulo and Plessinger on Lap 2 and continued his push to the front by passing Savatgy for second on Lap 3, bringing Plessinger along with him into third. Osborne remained in control of the moto throughout, but another rider was on a charge to the front. After starting seventh Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Austin Forkner stormed through the field and broke into podium position on Lap 7 after passing Plessinger. His determination continued and he was able to close in on Martin for second. The KTM rider fended off Forkner for several laps, but gave up the spot on Lap 14 and dropped off the podium after losing another spot to his brother Jeremy, who rides for GEICO Honda, that same lap. Osborne took the win by 2.9 seconds over Forkner, with Jeremy Martin in third. Osborne dominated en route to his second career win. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 1-1 sweep gave Osborne an easy overall victory, the second of his career, while Alex Martin’s consistent 4-4 results were enough to give him the runner-up spot. Plessinger completed the overall podium (3-5) after tying with Martin in points, but losing the tiebreaker based on second-moto results. “It was nice to carry the momentum from supercross and take the pressure off the [start of the] outdoor season, and come out of here with max points,” said Osborne. “This is always one of the roughest tracks we have all year, so you always come in here kind of guessing. It’s good to know we’re leaving with the points lead and a win. My goal was to be in the top five and challenge for a podium, so to come away with a 1-1 is pretty awesome.” Osborne already holds a double-digit lead of 14 points in the 250 Class standings over Martin and Plessinger. Alex Martin’s 4-4 results were good enough for second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 2017 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship continues next Saturday, May 27, with its second round from Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, California. First motos of the FMF Glen Helen National can be seen live on MAVTV at 1 p.m. PT / 4 p.m. ET, while second motos will air live on NBC Sports Network at 3 p.m. PT / 6 p.m. ET. Additionally, all the action can be seen as it unfolds online via the NBC Sports Gold app. Plessinger rounded out the overall podium. Photo: Jeff Kardas Results Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic Prairie City SVRA – Rancho Cordova, Calif. May 20, 2017 450 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki (1-1) Marvin Musquin, France, KTM (2-2) Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki (3-3) Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna (10-4) Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki (7-7) Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM (6-8) Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha (5-9) Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda (4-12) Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki (11-5) Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki (8-10) 450 Class Championship Standings Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki – 50 Marvin Musquin, France, KTM – 44 Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki – 40 Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna – 29 Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki – 28 Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM – 28 Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha – 28 Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda – 27 Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki – 26 Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki – 24 250 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna (1-1) Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM (4-4) Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha (3-5) Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki (2-8) Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki (11-2) Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha (5-6) Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki (7-7) Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki (8-9) Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM (6-12) Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha (9-11) 250 Class Championship Standings Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna – 50 Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM – 36 Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha – 36 Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki – 35 Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki – 32 Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha – 31 Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki – 28 Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki – 25 Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM – 24 Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha – 22 For information about the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, please visit ProMotocross.com and be sure to follow all of the Pro Motocross social media channels for exclusive content and additional information on the latest news: Facebook: @americanmotocross Instagram: @promotocross Twitter: @ProMotocross YouTube: AmericanMotocross Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, features the world’s fastest outdoor motocross racers, racing aboard the best bikes each factory offers, on the roughest, toughest tracks in the world. The 12-rounds series begins at Hangtown in May and ends at Indiana’s Ironman Raceway in August. It includes stops at the premier motocross racing facilities in America, with events in California, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Michigan, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington, New York and Indiana. The pro riders race on Saturday afternoon, with competition divided into two classes: one for 250cc machines, and one for 450cc machines. The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship is managed by MX Sports Pro Racing, the industry leader in off-road power sports event production. The series is televised on NBC, NBCSN and MAVTV and streamed live on NBC Sports Gold Series partners include Lucas Oil (series title sponsor), Red Bull, WPS, Fly Racing, GEICO Motorcycle, MotoSport.com, Garmin, 100%, KTM, FMF, Deltran Battery Tender, Pirelli, Suzuki, Husqvarna, Pivot Works, Vertex, Alpinestars, KMC Wheels, MotionPro, VP Racing Fuels, Acerbis and Racer X. More information can be found at www.ProMotocross.com. Source: Racer Productions, Inc.
  11. Radebell

    Rear brake not working

    My rear brake does not even stop my rear tire from the slight rotation while in neutral, revving the bike. I have replaced the brake fluid with the DOT 4 (suggested Suzuki brake fluid), bleed the line countless times, and still to no avail, absolutely no brake. So I believe the problem lies in the caliper piston? Has anyone ever experienced a bad piston?
  12. I was trail riding on Tuesday and I crashed like 6 times (very unusual for me) but 3 of the crashes were kinda hard. I bowed the shit out of my left radiator shroud so its bent and looks retarded, but the radiator is pretty bent and twisted too. Its not horrible, I've seen much worse, I wish I could post a picture, it just looks like its kinda "crunched". Its not leaking though, I was wondering if its OK to ride with this until i can afford a new rad. Its a 2015 CRF250R, (plz dont move to honda forums ill get no responses). I'm just concerned that 1. It might not cool the bike enough with reduced flow, or 2: that it might reduce flow and cut coolant out from the engine which could overheat or worse... what you guys think?
  13. Hello all, I appreciate the help this forum has given me over the past couple of years. I recently picked up an '01 DRZ400s and decided to do the FCR carb swap. I feel pretty confident that I managed to read almost all of the valuable threads regarding the CV to FCR swaps on this forum and others. Being a fairly competent mechanic, I opted to pick up a local FCR MX off of a YFZ450 from Craigslist. I've rebuilt quite a few carbs and I feel like I now have a greater appreciation for why the experienced group recommends people go for the new FCR swap kit or something that's off of a validated running bike. There are so many moving parts inside of the FCRs that are prone to wear, the margin for issues can grow pretty large. It was my first time inside of one, so I know for the future. Regardless, I have a used MX that was worked on with heavy hands and I'll do my best to make it run for me. Moving parts are in pretty fair condition as far as I can tell, but I'm having some issues with the rollers on the slide. There are 3 rollers which are fixed with bearings and 1 that's removable. 2 fixed ones with bearings have a little drag and you can feel that the bearings have some wear. It's not terrible, but I'd like it sorted while it's opened up. Prior to replacing a slide, my questions are: Could these bearings be gently removed and replaced with the rollers that don't have bearings? https://www.jetsrus.com/individual_parts/021_027_su.html Are there replacements for just the sealed bearings? I assume you'd have to take measurements and just find aftermarket ones, which is likely not worth it at all. Has anyone found any good tricks for cleaning these bearings? I believe they're sealed, which is generally a tough one to fix. I've heard of people soaking sealed bearings in solvent for 24 hours and then heating the bearing before spinning the solvent out. Thanks for your help,
  14. SumoN00B

    TM Racing difference SMX MX FI

    So I bought a 2013 TM Racing 450 SMX Fi. My preferred online site for parts do not offer parts for the SMX, but they do offer for the MX. I know the brakes are different. But how about chains, sprockets, air filters and so on? All help is appreciated:) braaaaap!
  15. mxrook

    clutch trouble

    hey guys, I'm new to the world of bikes and my uncle has experience with bikes and showed me a few simple things like brake pads and bleeding my brake lines, i just bought my first bike a 2006 rm125. first time i went to ride we started it up and went to put it in first gear, slammed first gear and stalled. figured out if i rev while putting it in gear it goes in fine with a little lurch (no problem just getting my bearings riding the bike for now).clutch plates are brand new, swapped in a new clutch cable hoping that was the only issue. so with a brand new cable I'm still having this problem it seems as though the fitment is off. i was wondering if anyone has an opinions on what might be wrong, i was told something might be missing on the inside (from when previous owner replaced clutch) because the arm that holds the clutch inside the engine (no idea the name of it) could be a little bit lower so that it engages sooner and better. again like i said i apologize I'm a newb with all this and just looking for opinions on what may be wrong. my question is, why wont a clutch cable made for my bike not fit right? could i be missing an internal component causing issues? and should i just go with a whole new clutch kit?
  16. Jimmy Pascol

    Rear Brake Help

    So I wanted to increase the rear brake effectiveness on my XT. They're good as they are but could always be better if somebody is laying on the track in your line. Then it hit me like a two-ton heavy thing: Swap the rear brake arm! That's a remedy for touchy brakes that lock up too easily as well as for bikes needing more stopping power. Experiment with different lengths until you find one you like.
  17. We had a great time at Arkansaw MX. The track was slightly different, and the dirt was awesome. However, the grass has grown up, and if you aren't familiar, there is a dangerously big pit to the left of the second set of whoops. I slid off the track, off to the left of the whoops. I didn't hurry to get back on, it was slippery, I was going to meander back over... when I found the pit. Watch my faceplant here: It's right after the 4 minute mark. Be careful out there!
  18. Reeve Harper

    KTM 85 green oil leak

    Hi, my Husqvarna (KTM in disguise) 85 has just sprung an oil leak while it was layed over on it’s left side, the oil was dripping off the bottom of the foot peg and an alarming amount of oil has come out, and the oil seems to have a green tinge to it. Does anyone know what this is? Thanks
  19. I'll try and give the timeline as best I can. Got a good deal months back on a bike that had cold start issues, well starting issue in general but it got better while warm. Had some issue idling but it ran really strong when you got it up to speed. Tried cleaning the stock carb multiple times (ultrasonic cleaned twice, once by me, once by a shop) and it didn't really solve much. Checked valves and they're in spec, which it should have been for having 9k miles. Don't get me wrong, bike ran well but wasn't reliable enough while starting that I didn't trust riding outside of my local area. Bit the bullet and bought an FCR MX39 which was my plan anyways, and that solved quite a bit of the issues, but brought up more. Start is better but it still takes a while, especially when cold. Idle is steady but will drop and die if too low. I occasionally get this loud pop while trying to start, like gun shot pop. I also now have this hanging idle issue when decelerating or coming to a stop. I can fix it by blipping the throttle which then makes the idles drop. If my idle is set too low, it will drop too low and stall. From my research I think it's a vacuum issue, which is weird cause the tubes are all there and the petcock vacuum is plugged. Took the throttle cables off to see if they were sticking and causing the issue but the video proves that's not true. I also checked for any air leaks near the boots, not it. Pulled the carb last night and only checked the slide but noticed this wearing on the top right corner and this super odd bubbling on the pressure plate. For the start issues I've heard bad CDI, but I'm not sure. Anyone have any suggestions or help they could provide? I promise a beer on me if I'm ever in your area! Video 1: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0By7xlw5wWOLHRVNfbGhCcUxmWXc Video 2: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0By7xlw5wWOLHaFVrRnlXcVpQSFE
  20. Hey Everyone, I received a new price sheet from Alta and wanted to give you a quick update. The Redshift has proven to be a very competitive model in 2017. But, the major factor holding many consumers back is the price. Alta has adopted a very aggressive pricing structure In an effort to put the Electric platform within reach of more riders.... So, without further ado: 2018 Alta MX $10,495 (reduced from $14,995) 2018 Alta EX $12,995 (reduced from $15,495) 2018 Alta SM $13,495 (reduced from $15,495) All offroad models (EX and MX) will require a charger, you will two options for this: Base (currently shipping with the Alta MX and EX) $499 Upgraded (will have some additional features) $799 All SM models will continue to feature onboard charging and do not require a separate charger purchase. Alta has also given some incentives for 2017 models as well (these prices may vary depending on dealer) here is what we have available: 2017 Alta Redshift MX (Demo with 66 hours) $9,999 (includes charger) 2017 Alta Redshift MX (brand new) $10,495 (includes charger) To give you an idea of how competitive these prices are, the 2018 KTM Freeride E-XC will likely retail for over $13K! The Alta Redshift, in almost every way, is a superior motorcycle for a lot less money! I will do my best to keep you updated on any changes for 2018 as soon as they become available. In the meantime, please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the Redshift lineup or would like to schedule a private demo. Scott Elite Motorsports scott@elitektm.com 970-461-1022
  21. Last race of the series!!! Should be an interesting day in 450's
  22. Hi, New member here! I am interested in 2 bikes, the KTM 125 SX and 150 SX. I know the 150 SX is obviously got a bit more power but I am wondering what the exact differences are. Is it just the cylinder and piston or are there other changes? I am wondering because if there are big differences that means that parts made for the 125 SX won't fit the 150 SX. Most parts are for 125/250/300 bikes I assume. I am assuming that they are very much the same which means that if for example a company makes an exhaust for the 125 SX then it would fit on the 150 SX. I hope that is true. My other question is on the Power Valve system. Does KTM use that Power Valve with the green, yellow and red springs for the 125 SX and 150 SX? Or is it that other one one with that notch? Any help is glady appreciated! Sorry I am also fairly dumb when it comes to bikes, although I used to ride a lot, as it has been a while. I have forgotten a lot about riding.
  23. Ride Engineering

    Is Your Handlebar Position Working Against You?

    At Ride Engineering, we pay close attention to handlebar position and bar mount height. You’d be surprised just how much a few millimeters from stock can make to improve your body position and overall control. Keeping the bars neutral is another important aspect. By this we mean keeping the bars parallel to the forks within a few degrees. Drastically changing them by raising the bars 25mm+ or moving them forward that much can have a totally adverse effect. This article’s main focus is to explain where the “sweet spot” is for maximum control reinforcing the proper riding position on track or trail. Handlebars that are rotated too far out of parallel alignment with the forks can create adverse handling issues The first thing that you want to do is pick a handlebar bend that you are comfortable with. Typically, a lower bar will allow you to “muscle” the bike more, but it should still be relative to your height. For example, at my 5’6” stature I like the lowest bends. Currently, my favorite handlebar is the Husqvarna bend Pro Taper Evo. It's 80mm in height at the ends and a little less sweep that my old favorite, the Pro Taper Carmichael. If you’re a bit taller, you may like the SX Race bend with a height of 87mm. Those over 6’, may like the stock Honda bars at 97mm tall (Renthal 971). Since each bike is different, your favorite bar may still need further adjustment. For example, I love the Husky bar on a Husky or KTM with the stock bar height, but on the 2017 CRF450R, I preferred it 5mm lower. On my current 2018 RM-Z450, I prefer them 5mm higher. I tried the SX Race bend with the stock bar mount height, but they felt too tall for me, even though the net difference was only 2mm more. Also, due to my short arms, in every case I run the bar mounts in the back position. This gives me a good head over the bars posture and maximum control of the bike. Incidentally, the forward holes that come on a stock KX-F and YZ-F triple clamps are too far forward for most riders. Before you start shaking your head and tell me that the OEMs wouldn’t design it that way if that were true, let me explain further. Because they use a rubber mounting design, which I agree is way better than the old metal on metal system, they have no choice but to put the forward holes 25-30mm out. The rubber cones are over an inch in diameter, so it’s not physically possible to provide a second mounting position any closer than that. Remember, KTM used to have two positions. But back then it was only a 10mm bolt hole, so it was possible to add a second hole 15mm away. Then by using an offset bar mount you could make changes in 5mm increments. Now that they also offer a rubber cone system, they have eliminated the forward position all together. Ride Engineering bar mounts are typically made the same height as stock (except YZ bar mounts which are the same as the 2017 & older stock mounts and 5mm lower than the 2018) with plus or minus 3mm of adjustability forward or back. We also offer 5mm and 10mm spacer kits to raise our mounts (Ride bar mounts come with posts that unscrew to allow for a height adjustment or to replace in the event they are bent in a crash). Aftermarket bar mounts that are 20 or more millimeters higher that stock are going to put the rider in a less than ideal riding position. Neutrally mounted handlebars Many steering dampers also have this adverse effect. They mount over the stem nut and under the handlebar, so often raising the bar is the only way to make clearance (Ride Eng. offers a damper kit that mounts behind the front number plate, allowing one to keep the bar height standard). Some riders like to go on mellow trail rides for a couple of hours and have found really tall handlebars add comfort. The problem lies when you come across a rider heading in your direction or an unforeseen obstacle that needs an instantaneous reaction. A poor riding posture can contribute to a crash and getting injured. If that happens, any added comfort will be the last thing on your mind. Handlebar mounts w/ spacers Here’s how a few fast guys with a lot of riding experience set up their riding position: Sean Lipanovich Pro 5’5” - 150lb - 27 yrs old Years riding from 12 yrs old to present Slmxschool.com Current ride: 2017 KTM450sxf Sean has raced professional supercross and motorcross, finished in the top 25 at the 2016 USGP, won the 25+ class at the 2017 Vet World championships and now trains young riders for SL MX School. He’s always couching riders to “put your head over the bars, squeeze the bike with your knees and be on the balls of your feet.” “I run the stock KTM handlebars (78mm tall) in the back position (bar mounts rotated back) with the Ride Eng. bar mount that is the same height as stock with the bars neutral (not rotated forward or back) to the forks. I feel this gives me the most control of the bike to get on the gas harder.” Kris Keefer Pro 6’ – 170lbs – 40 yrs old Years riding from 9 yrs old to present Keeferinctesting.com Favorite bike: 2018 YZ450F At 24 years old, Kris started his testing career with Yamaha Motor Corporation which led him to a position at Dirt Rider magazine as associate editor, then eventually to Senior Test editor. Today he’s doing his own testing and pod casts as a new business owner for keeferinctesting.com. Throughout his career he’s raced professional motocross and supercross, the Canadian nationals, Vet World and Loretta Lynn’s. “I use the SX Race bend on my YZ450F with last year’s bar mounts (5mm lower) in the back hole with the mounts rotated forward. I like to keep the bars fairly neutral and coach others to do the same. If you have your bars rotated too far back, it’s harder to get your weight forward on the bike when entering corners. If you have them rotated too far forward where the ends are pointing up, you don’t have the right leverage to initiate the turn.” Ted Campbell Pro 6’ – 210lbs – 42 yrs old Years riding from 12yrs old to present Current bike: 2017 CRF450R Ted has traveled the world racing professional supercross and motorcross and has made many lifelong friends because of dirt bikes. He obtained his first pro national number in 1999 and kept a top 100 number for 6-7 years of his professional racing career. “I use the Mika Metal’s RC bend (this is a tall bar at 105mm), and like to set up my bike with my bars just behind the forks (bar mounts rotated back) in the neutral position so I can get over the front of the bike. I feel I have more control turning and it puts me more in the attack position. I run my bars back further than most being 6’ tall but it gives me the ability to really feel comfortable turning and leaning the bike over as I’m on top of the bars more.” Ted added a set of Ride Eng. CRf triple clamps which did lower the bar position 5mm and moved it 3mm forward from stock. Cody Webb Pro 6’ 3” – 185lbs – 29 yrs old Years riding from 3yrs old to present https://www.facebook.com/codywebb247/ Current bike: 2017 350EXC Cody is the 2010 AMA National Trials champion, 2014 and 2017 AMA Endurocross champion and has finished on the podium or won numerous other off-road races like the 2017 Erzberg Rodeo where he finished in 3rd place. “I run the PHDS bar mount system (these have +/- 5mm of adjustability) with the Renthal 996 handlebars (93mm tall) on Neken triple clamps with no added bar risers although sometimes I hit my knees on the bars. We place the bar mount in the forward hole (these have two 10mm holes for adjustment) with the bar mounts rotated back. If I have the stock clamps on my practice bike, I run the mounts in the forward position. I also like the bars just a hair rolled back from the neutral position.” Cody’s race results speak for themselves and his “average Joe” set up works great even for a guy 6’3” tall (he only raised his bars 15mm from the stock height). I hope this helps everyone understand regardless of your stature, you shouldn’t increase your bar height or move the bars forward too drastically. Small increments of 5mm is ideal. In many cases such as mine lowering the bars will be far more beneficial in reinforcing proper riding posture, getting your head over the bars and maintaining optimal control of your dirt bike. Happy riding. Adrian Ciomo President Ride-engineering.com Vet Int. 5’6” - 150lb - 53 yrs old Years riding from 14 yrs old to present Current ride: 2018 RMZ450 About Ride Engineering Ride Engineering Inc designs and manufactures the highest quality billet aluminum accessories to improve the performance of motocross and off-road motorcycles specializing in handling and braking components. The company combines hands on testing with feedback from past and present professional race teams to bring products to the average customer that are typically not available for sale. Located in Southern California, all Ride Engineering products are made in the USA. For more information on the company visit: http://www.ride-engineering.com/about.php
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