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Found 90 results

  1. SuperMotoFreek

    FCR 39 mm for the Canadiens

    Hey there! I'm looking for a FCR39 to put in my 2016 DRZ400sm. I find it hard to find info on this topic. I want to max out the power on my bike and keep it reliable. I work for a Arctic Cat dealer and i have 3 clients how are looking to do the same on there bikes. can you guys help guide me? thanks
  2. For 2018, the Monster Energy Supercross starting gate goes from dirt to a steel grate starting pad. Watch how this new system tests a rider’s technique at the most critical moment in a race.
  3. hello guys, i just saw the new helmet from scott and it looks amazing, but i couldn't find nowhere what the weight of it would be has anybody bought this helmet, what is your thoughts on it? and maybe someone weighted it. thanks
  4. Hello all, I appreciate the help this forum has given me over the past couple of years. I recently picked up an '01 DRZ400s and decided to do the FCR carb swap. I feel pretty confident that I managed to read almost all of the valuable threads regarding the CV to FCR swaps on this forum and others. Being a fairly competent mechanic, I opted to pick up a local FCR MX off of a YFZ450 from Craigslist. I've rebuilt quite a few carbs and I feel like I now have a greater appreciation for why the experienced group recommends people go for the new FCR swap kit or something that's off of a validated running bike. There are so many moving parts inside of the FCRs that are prone to wear, the margin for issues can grow pretty large. It was my first time inside of one, so I know for the future. Regardless, I have a used MX that was worked on with heavy hands and I'll do my best to make it run for me. Moving parts are in pretty fair condition as far as I can tell, but I'm having some issues with the rollers on the slide. There are 3 rollers which are fixed with bearings and 1 that's removable. 2 fixed ones with bearings have a little drag and you can feel that the bearings have some wear. It's not terrible, but I'd like it sorted while it's opened up. Prior to replacing a slide, my questions are: Could these bearings be gently removed and replaced with the rollers that don't have bearings? https://www.jetsrus.com/individual_parts/021_027_su.html Are there replacements for just the sealed bearings? I assume you'd have to take measurements and just find aftermarket ones, which is likely not worth it at all. Has anyone found any good tricks for cleaning these bearings? I believe they're sealed, which is generally a tough one to fix. I've heard of people soaking sealed bearings in solvent for 24 hours and then heating the bearing before spinning the solvent out. Thanks for your help,
  5. Tomac Relies on Impressive Come-From-Behind Effort in Final Moto to Take Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Opener at Hangtown Osborne Begins 250 Class Title Chase with Dominant Victory RANCHO CORDOVA, CA – May 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, kicked off its 2017 season on Saturday with the 49th running of the Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic at Prairie City SVRA and a wide-open battle for each respective championship. The first of 12 rounds this summer provided hot temperatures and a huge crowd that witnessed a stellar battle for victory in the 450 Class, from which Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Eli Tomac emerged with a gritty overall win after an impressive come-from-behind effort in the final moto. In the 250 Class, Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Zach Osborne earned the second overall win of his career with a dominant effort, sweeping both motos. Tomac battled through the field to clinch the win with a 1-1 moto sweep. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 450 Class began its first moto of the season with Team Honda HRC’s Christian Craig earning the Motosport.com Holeshot, ahead of Team Red Bull KTM Factory Racing’s Marvin Musquin and Monster Energy/Yamalube/Chaparral/Yamaha Financial Services/Yamaha Factory Racing rookie Cooper Webb, last year’s 250 Class Champion. Tomac fought his way forward from a start of about seventh to conclude the opening lap in fourth. As he neared the completion of the opening lap Craig crashed out of the lead, allowing Musquin to assume control of the 30-minute-plus-two-lap moto. As that unfolded Tomac surged into second, passing Webb in addition to Craig. From there the race became a two-rider battle. Musquin kept Tomac’s advances at bay for a couple laps, but the Kawasaki rider made an aggressive move at the start of Lap 3 and slipped by on the outside of his KTM counterpart. Musquin made a slight bobble shortly thereafter, which established a separation between the two that would continue to grow. From there the attention focused on the battle for third between Webb and Monster Energy Kawasaki’s Josh Grant, who started fifth. Grant patiently waited for his opportunity to strike and did so on Lap 5. From there the top three remained unchanged through to the finish. Despite a small crash late in the moto that cost him over 10 seconds to Musquin, Tomac still took the win by 15.4 seconds. Musquin (25) and Tomac (3) put on a show for the fans in Moto 2. Photo: Jeff Kardas Tomac had his work cut out for him in the second moto, which saw Grant take the Motosport.com Holeshot ahead of Musquin, RCH/Yoshimura/Suzuki Factory Racing’s Broc Tickle, and Autotrader/Monster Energy/Suzuki/JGRMX’s Justin Barcia. Tomac was outside the top 10 as the field entered the first turn, but managed to claw his way into eighth before the completion of the opening lap. The holeshot allowed Grant to take advantage of the clear track and he set a strong early pace to open a gap on Musquin, while Barcia slotted into third. Behind them Tomac was able to make some early passes to break into the top five and then engaged in a battle with Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Dean Wilson for fourth. Tomac’s patience paid off on Lap 5 as he was able to make the pass on Wilson for fourth. Shortly thereafter he caught Barcia for third and put himself in podium position on the same lap. With Grant in the lead, Musquin in second, and Tomac in third the battle for the overall win was still up for grabs, with Grant in control of his own destiny. After leading the first seven laps of the moto, Grant slowly started to lose ground to Musquin, who picked up his pace following Tomac’s move into third. The lead duo battled for the lead briefly, but Musquin was able to make the pass on Lap 7 and put himself in position to win the overall. Tomac’s charge to the front wasn’t complete, and he quickly disposed of his teammate to move into second on Lap 9. He then closed in onto the rear fender of the leading KTM, producing an incredible battle for the lead that elicited roars from the crowd. Musquin and Tomac jockeyed for the top spot for several laps, with the Frenchman able to counter every one of Tomac’s advances. The leaders continued to trade lines all over the track, coming within inches of making contact with one another on numerous occasions. On Lap 12 Tomac was able to take advantage of a slight bobble by Musquin and make another impressive outside pass. Once in front Tomac quickly opened a lead, eventually crossing the finish line 8.7 seconds ahead of Musquin. Grant followed with a strong third-place effort. With identical moto scores for the lead trio across both motos, Tomac (1-1), Musquin (2-2), and Grant (3-3) completed the overall podium in the same fashion. “There was some good battling today. In the first moto I got into a good groove quickly and made the passes early to go on and win, but the second moto was tough,” said Tomac. “That was a good ole classic battle [with Musquin]. I really had to dig deep and try every line possible to make time up on the leaders. It feels good to get through the first round and leave with the red plate.” Tomac’s perfect scores give him a six-point lead over Musquin in the 450 Class standings, while Grant sits 10 points back in third. Musquin finished second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The opening 250 Class moto saw Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Adam Cianciarulo claim the first Motosport.com Holeshot of the season, with Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Sean Cantrell slotting into second in his pro debut and Osborne settling in third. Osborne applied pressure on the rookie on Lap 1 and moved into second, ultimately setting his sights on Cianciarulo for the lead. The lead pair swapped fast laps throughout the first portion of the 30-minutes-plus-two-laps moto before Osborne was able to eventually get around the Kawasaki and take control of the race. Behind them, Yamalube/Star Racing Yamaha’s Aaron Plessinger fought his way around Cantrell to take over third. Once in the lead Osborne was able to open a comfortable gap that he easily maintained throughout the remainder of the moto, which was further aided by lapped traffic. Plessinger applied pressure on Cianciarulo for several laps, but eventually both riders asserted themselves in the remaining podium spots. Osborne took the third moto win of his career 5.3 seconds ahead of Cianciarulo, with Plessinger following in third. Grant enjoyed his first podium effort since the 2013 season. Photo: Jeff Kardas With the overall win within reach, Osborne took control of Moto 2 immediately out of the gate, grabbing the Motosport.com Holeshot over the Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki duo of Joey Savatgy and Cianciarulo. Savtagy showed impressive early speed and was able to briefly lead the moto, but Osborne got back around on Lap 1 and never looked back. Cianciarulo gave up third place to Plessinger and would soon fall out of contention. The rider to watch in the early stages was Troy Lee Designs/Red Bull/KTM’s Alex Martin, who started fifth. Martin was able to surpass both Cianciarulo and Plessinger on Lap 2 and continued his push to the front by passing Savatgy for second on Lap 3, bringing Plessinger along with him into third. Osborne remained in control of the moto throughout, but another rider was on a charge to the front. After starting seventh Monster Energy/Pro Circuit/Kawasaki’s Austin Forkner stormed through the field and broke into podium position on Lap 7 after passing Plessinger. His determination continued and he was able to close in on Martin for second. The KTM rider fended off Forkner for several laps, but gave up the spot on Lap 14 and dropped off the podium after losing another spot to his brother Jeremy, who rides for GEICO Honda, that same lap. Osborne took the win by 2.9 seconds over Forkner, with Jeremy Martin in third. Osborne dominated en route to his second career win. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 1-1 sweep gave Osborne an easy overall victory, the second of his career, while Alex Martin’s consistent 4-4 results were enough to give him the runner-up spot. Plessinger completed the overall podium (3-5) after tying with Martin in points, but losing the tiebreaker based on second-moto results. “It was nice to carry the momentum from supercross and take the pressure off the [start of the] outdoor season, and come out of here with max points,” said Osborne. “This is always one of the roughest tracks we have all year, so you always come in here kind of guessing. It’s good to know we’re leaving with the points lead and a win. My goal was to be in the top five and challenge for a podium, so to come away with a 1-1 is pretty awesome.” Osborne already holds a double-digit lead of 14 points in the 250 Class standings over Martin and Plessinger. Alex Martin’s 4-4 results were good enough for second overall. Photo: Jeff Kardas The 2017 Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship continues next Saturday, May 27, with its second round from Glen Helen Raceway in San Bernardino, California. First motos of the FMF Glen Helen National can be seen live on MAVTV at 1 p.m. PT / 4 p.m. ET, while second motos will air live on NBC Sports Network at 3 p.m. PT / 6 p.m. ET. Additionally, all the action can be seen as it unfolds online via the NBC Sports Gold app. Plessinger rounded out the overall podium. Photo: Jeff Kardas Results Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship Red Bull Hangtown Motocross Classic Prairie City SVRA – Rancho Cordova, Calif. May 20, 2017 450 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki (1-1) Marvin Musquin, France, KTM (2-2) Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki (3-3) Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna (10-4) Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki (7-7) Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM (6-8) Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha (5-9) Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda (4-12) Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki (11-5) Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki (8-10) 450 Class Championship Standings Eli Tomac, Cortez, Colo., Kawasaki – 50 Marvin Musquin, France, KTM – 44 Josh Grant, Riverside, Calif., Kawasaki – 40 Dean Wilson, Glasgow, Scotland, Husqvarna – 29 Broc Tickle, Holly, Mich., Suzuki – 28 Blake Baggett, Grand Terrace, Calif., KTM – 28 Cooper Webb, Newport, N.C., Yamaha – 28 Cole Seely, Newbury Park, Calif., Honda – 27 Justin Barcia, Monroe, N.Y., Suzuki – 26 Justin Bogle, Cushing, Okla., Suzuki – 24 250 Class Overall Results (Moto Finish) Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna (1-1) Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM (4-4) Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha (3-5) Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki (2-8) Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki (11-2) Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha (5-6) Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki (7-7) Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki (8-9) Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM (6-12) Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha (9-11) 250 Class Championship Standings Zach Osborne, Abingdon, Va., Husqvarna – 50 Alex Martin, Millville, Minn., KTM – 36 Aaron Plessinger, Hamilton, Ohio, Yamaha – 36 Adam Cianciarulo, Port Orange, Fla., Kawasaki – 35 Austin Forkner, Richards, Mo., Kawasaki – 32 Colt Nichols, Muskogee, Okla., Yamaha – 31 Joey Savatgy, Thomasville, Ga., Kawasaki – 28 Justin Hill, Yoncalla, Ore., Kawasaki – 25 Mitchell Oldenburg, Alvord, Texas, KTM – 24 Mitchell Harrison, Brighton, Mich., Yamaha – 22 For information about the Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, please visit ProMotocross.com and be sure to follow all of the Pro Motocross social media channels for exclusive content and additional information on the latest news: Facebook: @americanmotocross Instagram: @promotocross Twitter: @ProMotocross YouTube: AmericanMotocross Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship, sanctioned by AMA Pro Racing, features the world’s fastest outdoor motocross racers, racing aboard the best bikes each factory offers, on the roughest, toughest tracks in the world. The 12-rounds series begins at Hangtown in May and ends at Indiana’s Ironman Raceway in August. It includes stops at the premier motocross racing facilities in America, with events in California, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Tennessee, Michigan, Massachusetts, Maryland, Minnesota, Washington, New York and Indiana. The pro riders race on Saturday afternoon, with competition divided into two classes: one for 250cc machines, and one for 450cc machines. The Lucas Oil Pro Motocross Championship is managed by MX Sports Pro Racing, the industry leader in off-road power sports event production. The series is televised on NBC, NBCSN and MAVTV and streamed live on NBC Sports Gold Series partners include Lucas Oil (series title sponsor), Red Bull, WPS, Fly Racing, GEICO Motorcycle, MotoSport.com, Garmin, 100%, KTM, FMF, Deltran Battery Tender, Pirelli, Suzuki, Husqvarna, Pivot Works, Vertex, Alpinestars, KMC Wheels, MotionPro, VP Racing Fuels, Acerbis and Racer X. More information can be found at www.ProMotocross.com. Source: Racer Productions, Inc.
  6. Radebell

    Rear brake not working

    My rear brake does not even stop my rear tire from the slight rotation while in neutral, revving the bike. I have replaced the brake fluid with the DOT 4 (suggested Suzuki brake fluid), bleed the line countless times, and still to no avail, absolutely no brake. So I believe the problem lies in the caliper piston? Has anyone ever experienced a bad piston?
  7. Frequently I discuss the importance of proper hydration and nutrition as it relates to building and repairing muscle tissue, burning unwanted body fat and consuming enough water, sugar and electrolytes to perform optimally every day when you head out the door. With this in mind, I want you to begin keeping a very detailed analysis of your sweat rate. Nutrition as it relates to performance is an interesting subject; we look at the quality and quantity of your food intake and evaluate if you have enough energy to finish your workouts feeling strong throughout the duration of the workout. If you begin to fatigue, we know that we need to adjust the quantity (we assume that the quality is there at this point). Now let’s take a detailed look at your hydration as it relates to your performance. Proper hydration is going to affect your body in two ways: one, it helps you regulate your core body temperature. The cooler you are from the inside out, the better you will perform. The second benefit to proper hydration is that your muscles (and brain) are receiving enough water, electrolytes and sugar to perform properly: good mental clarity and strong muscle contractions. To improve your confidence on race day, you need to know what your sweat/replenishment rate is specific to your intensity with the factor of temperature & humidity. Though it sounds tedious during the week, it is invaluable on race day – you will know exactly what your hydration strategy to implement to race up to your fullest potential. Until next time, work smart - not hard! -Coach Robb
  8. I've just picked up this FCR MX 39 - hoping to fit it to my 2008 DRZ 400 SM. The PO tells me this came from a WR 426. I've trawled the forums here and that's answered a lot of my questions, but hoping someone can help me with a few unknowns... - the PO cleaned the carb in an ultrasonic tank. I'm not keen on these unless I know what cleaner was used - which I don't, so I'm planning on replacing all gaskets. Should I split the carb and replace the mid gasket? These are available from several sources including James Dean. A number of posters suggest this shouldn't be done... - The choke and hot start assemblies were fitted in the wrong positions (swapped over) I've corrected this, but neither knob will stay out on its detent (spring straight back in). Is that likely to be damage caused by the incorrect fitting, or just worn assemblies? - See the pic with the arrow I've drawn. (1.JPG) on other carbs I've seen this vent has a T-piece to which 2 vents are connected. My carb only has the one vent outlet here, but there is another vent out about 3 inches below it (below the coast enricher) which I haven't seen on other FCRs. No vent tubes came with the carb, so I'm guessing 1 tube on each? - Consensus is that it's better to remove the coast enricher. Is this simply removing the 2 screws and dumping the cover and the bits beneath it? Any holes need sealing? - Can the TPS be plugged straight into the DRZ loom? Any other suggestions welcome. I'm not a mechanic so talk to me in simple terms Ta
  9. SumoN00B

    TM Racing difference SMX MX FI

    So I bought a 2013 TM Racing 450 SMX Fi. My preferred online site for parts do not offer parts for the SMX, but they do offer for the MX. I know the brakes are different. But how about chains, sprockets, air filters and so on? All help is appreciated:) braaaaap!
  10. DiamondBenz

    Chicago area riders... help

    Hi everyone... are there any Chicago areas riders that can help with getting into riding dirt please??? Where are the tracks? Private? Outdoor? Indoor? Even people to ride with? I have about 2 months to decide if it’s worth getting a dirt bike or go with a motard or something. Any help or advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
  11. September 20, 2017 Motor Sports Newswire PICKERINGTON, OH – September 20, 2017 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – The American Motorcyclist Association has announced the professional competition numbers for pro-licensed riders competing in Monster Energy AMA Supercross, an FIM World Championship, and the Lucas Oil AMA Pro Motocross Championship for the 2018 season. All riders use the assigned professional number for competition. In addition, the current champion runs the No. 1 plate instead of an assigned professional number when competing in the class or region in which the No. 1 plate was earned. When competing in a class other than the class where the championship was earned, the rider must use the assigned professional number. 2018 Top 100 and Career Pro Numbers for AMA Supercross and Motocross * Career Numbers ** New Career Number for 2018 About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders’ interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com. Not a member? Join the AMA today. Source: American Motorcyclist Association
  12. mxrook

    clutch trouble

    hey guys, I'm new to the world of bikes and my uncle has experience with bikes and showed me a few simple things like brake pads and bleeding my brake lines, i just bought my first bike a 2006 rm125. first time i went to ride we started it up and went to put it in first gear, slammed first gear and stalled. figured out if i rev while putting it in gear it goes in fine with a little lurch (no problem just getting my bearings riding the bike for now).clutch plates are brand new, swapped in a new clutch cable hoping that was the only issue. so with a brand new cable I'm still having this problem it seems as though the fitment is off. i was wondering if anyone has an opinions on what might be wrong, i was told something might be missing on the inside (from when previous owner replaced clutch) because the arm that holds the clutch inside the engine (no idea the name of it) could be a little bit lower so that it engages sooner and better. again like i said i apologize I'm a newb with all this and just looking for opinions on what may be wrong. my question is, why wont a clutch cable made for my bike not fit right? could i be missing an internal component causing issues? and should i just go with a whole new clutch kit?
  13. I was trail riding on Tuesday and I crashed like 6 times (very unusual for me) but 3 of the crashes were kinda hard. I bowed the shit out of my left radiator shroud so its bent and looks retarded, but the radiator is pretty bent and twisted too. Its not horrible, I've seen much worse, I wish I could post a picture, it just looks like its kinda "crunched". Its not leaking though, I was wondering if its OK to ride with this until i can afford a new rad. Its a 2015 CRF250R, (plz dont move to honda forums ill get no responses). I'm just concerned that 1. It might not cool the bike enough with reduced flow, or 2: that it might reduce flow and cut coolant out from the engine which could overheat or worse... what you guys think?
  14. Hey guys, I am really needing some good advice here from anybody who has ever owned or rebuilt classic Yamaha 2 strokes (1989 - 1994). I live in South Africa, and bought a little farm thumper while on holiday this past weekend. It was advertised as a DT175 which is a bike that is easy to get parts for down here. It has been cosmetically customized and looks pretty darn cool... and lets face it, all the old classic Yamaha 2T engines look the same at a glance! So I genuinely thought it was a naked DT. The bike had no papers, and was used purely for the farmer to putt around on his farm. The only things needing attention was the stator cover which had snapped in half - this was visibly noticeable, and a little leak from a badly resealed gasket (both generally easy and cheap to fix here). The bike was still running and idling fine, started first kick, and I had a little ride around the farm before loading the bike up onto my pickup and heading off, thinking I could fix this thing up nicely in no time for next to nothing, and have what we call down in SA "a nuwe speelgoed" (A new plaything) for the weekends when I am not riding my beloved and reliable DRZ400SM. SO, I get home and decide to contact our local Yamaha branch, out of interest, to find out the history of the bike before I start fiddling (Don't ask me why I did not do this all before I bought the bike - It was a spur of the moment purchase, and was sold to me for dirt cheap!). I send off the VIN and engine number. Comes back, and this little freakin' turd turns out to be a 1989 TDR180!! WHAT. But now I am stuck as we do not really have TDR's down here - and I have never even seen one myself. Long story short - What alternative could I use as a stator cover? Do any other old Yamaha 2T model stator covers fit the TDR or share similar engine parts? Ordering from Ebay is so expensive thanks to my country being in junk status due to a junk president. So the shipping costs more than the actual item does, and our customs is a joke too. Yamaha has also advised me that this stator cover has been discontinued. I have put up local ads looking for parts, contacted FB 2T groups, and local shops. Nothing for TDR's has come back yet. Any advice or sharing of experience is welcome!
  15. Cameron Moakler

    4 Stroke Beginners Bike

    Hi, Im 15 years old and 110 lbs. Im looking to buy a dirt bike as i have ridden quads/ATVs since I was 8. Budget isnt really an issue just looking for suggestions I hate the power delivery of a two stroke as i have ridden my friends KTM SX 125, and i definitely prefer the sound of a four stroke! Looking for a 125 or 150, whichever you guys think is best for me Thanks!
  16. mxrider33

    450r or 660

    I am trying to decide either to buy a trx450r or raptor 660. I am 15 and have been riding for 4 years, dirt bikes and 4 wheelers and just came off a raptor 250 all modded out. I ride mainly trails and backroads. Which would be all around better for trails and backroads. I want something that is reliable also. Dont want a 400 sport quad cause i feel there down on power.
  17. Hey guys, I just sold my yz80, for $1100. Im down to two choices for a new dirt bike to buy, a 2003 cr125r, or a 2007 rm85 big wheel. I sold my 80 because i outgrew it, and im ready for a faster bike. Im only 5'3, so I know i wont be able to touch both feet on the 125, its got a freestyle seat, so it sits a little lower. Then, the rm85 is a big wheel, but i already outgrew my 80, and i dont know if the rm85 will be much faster. I rode my 80 amazing, i ride enduro/trail and I go to mx tracks to practice often. Let me know on what bike you guys think i should get. (By the way, my brother has a cr125 as well, and ive rode it and control the power well.)
  18. Scott Meshey 141

    lorettalynn The Post-Regional Report

    What’s up ThumperTalk readers! I’m back with an update from this past weekend at the Southeast Loretta Lynn’s Regional Championship at MillCreek MX as well as some thoughts going into Loretta’s prep. When I say that it was a long weekend, I mean that for more than just one reason! Between the drama of Open Pro Sport, 10 long and hard-fought motos, and some personal strifes, I was ready to leave the track with my tickets in hand. Of course, at the end of the day, I got what I went there to get… tickets to the ranch. With that being said, I will be going to Loretta’s in the 250A and College (18-24) classes. Before I start, I just want to say how awesome it was to return to a high-profile race and be welcomed back by good people as well as fellow competitors. While Motocross is a highly competitive atmosphere, we all like to see each other in good health. Loretta Lynn's SE Regional Championship at MillCreek MX, Photo my Martha @ MEPMX While there was some foul play among the races in the Open Pro Sport class, in the form of riders jumping the gate, leaving us to run 4 full motos instead of 3; I certainly did not make things easy on myself in most my race scenarios. I was trying to reacquaint myself with the old scenario of a full gate with some of the top racers in the class. It is very different racing local A races compared to racing almost 40 guys who are gunning for the top 6 positions in order to guarantee their spot at one of the most prestigious motocross races in the world, and they will do almost anything to get there. It took a few motos to get myself together, all the while working my way through the pack and making some rookie (but costly) mistakes. As far as speed goes, the lap times don’t lie… the speed was there, despite racing a 250 against 450s on a track that eats horsepower and will allow you to go as fast as you want as long as you have the cajones to twist the throttle. That’s why it’s one of my most favorite tracks of all time! However, in this sport, if you aren’t winning, there’s always a story. I will note though, it’s been since November of 2015 that I’ve been on an MX gate drop like that. That reality hit me pretty hard sometime this past weekend. However, I am proud of myself for gaining tickets in the A class, only riding for 3 months after a year off, in one regional compared to others who run two and three regionals to gain their ticket. Loretta Lynn's SE Regional Championship at MillCreek MX, Photo my Martha @ MEPMX There were things I needed to learn about my riding, some things that I needed to have reinstalled in my mind about racing at the top level, and things that I need to focus on going forward. I believe “reinstalled” is an appropriate word because I knew going into the race what I needed to do, but there were things that I forgot, as far as the level of importance. Probably the biggest thing is the importance of the start. At the top level of amateur racing, the top racers are all very close together as far as speed, usually within a second or two. If you get caught in a group of guys on the start, the top racers are already a few seconds ahead by the time you are able to make your moves. The start is the only place you can pass 41 other guys in a few seconds. While many already know this, understanding it is another thing… the race can be won or lost in the start. While I didn’t exactly nail all my starts, something I’ve always seemed to do well with is first-lap intensity. It’s easier to pass when racers are out-of-sorts compared to when they are comfortable, have a rhythm, and are using the main lines. I will give credit where credit is due and say thanks to Alex and Mr. Dan Frye for that valuable information. Going into Loretta’s prep time, I know where I stand, how to improve, and how I plan to make myself better. My costly mistakes from the weekend help shed light on what needs to change and the direction I need to go. I am a firm believer in learning from every experience. I was rusty! But I got the job done and continue to do what many never achieve for the 10th year. Something that may change however, is my path. Like I said in the first blog, nothing is certain in the world of Motocross. Stay tuned for more! Loretta Lynn's SE Regional Championship at MillCreek MX, Photo my Martha @ MEPMX Check in for content along the way and come along for the ride, tap/click the "Follow" button! I’ll see you at the races. Scott Meshey #141 I definitely want to thank everyone who helps me along this journey. Wouldn’t be able to do what I do without you all! Jimmy, Mike, and Eddie at Cycle Springs Powersports, Chris and the whole crew at Race Tech, Erik at Boyesen, ThumperTalk, Mike at FLY, Brad at EVS, Dien at Acerbis, Rich at EKS (X) Brand goggles, Rob at Dunlop, RoostMX Graphics, Simon at Mika Metals and DT1, MotoSeat, Kevin at Tamer Holeshot Hookup, Gregg at Lynk’s Racing, Andrew Campo, Ricky Renner for stealing my candy, Amish Sam, Momma Meshey, Keith, Amanda, Adam, and Lauren. Also, a huge thanks to everyone at USF Health, especially Dr. Tabatabian and Dr. Welsh for bringing me back to good health! Big thanks to Martha at MEPMX for the awesome shots!
  19. Man I will tell ya this season has been one of my favorites in a long time. I am so happy to say I do not feel it is because Dungey retired and KROC is hurt, I mean all of these guys are looking hungry, focused, racing the track, and have really stepped up. I am going to throw this out there now, I do not think this is a lock for anyone! I am a Tomac, Webb, Moose skin, and Tickle fan. But.............. I kinda would like to see the hard work Burrito put in to pay off. Same with Bogle. I don't see Bogle obviously as a champion, but dude stepped up in a serious way and he is obviously putting in the work at the ranch. He looks much cleaner, he is tucked in to the bike more, corner speed looks up as well. Bogle just looks good. How about Tickle? How cool would it be for him to stay consistant like he has and the others to keep having up and down moto's, he may have an outside shot and that will not break my heart one bit. I don't want to start off with too huge of an o.p. but even the lites are fun to watch, every race!!!!!!!!!! Well lites are usually more fun to watch!
  20. TheSnide

    Horn Rapids MX Park

    Hey Everyone, I just rented another RV, and my son and I are heading to Horn Rapids 11/9-11/12. We're hoping to ride Friday, Saturday, Sunday. We've been to Riverdale twice and hit Reiter Foothills a handful of times. But other than that we're straight beginners. My ask or question...is Horn Rapids okay for beginners? At our ability we can make it around the Vintage and Beginner tracks at Riverdale. I was able to clear the table on the back straight of the beginner track, but that's it. All the youtubes I've been watching of Horn Rapids make it seem a little more race only oriented, and well I'm nervous about it. What are your experiences? If anyone else is riding Horn Rapids with kids come hit us up. I'll be the guy in rented blue and white 22' Winnebgo towing two Honda's. You can laugh at me as I flounder trying to figure out the RV.
  21. #222 adds another 2! Red Bull KTM Factory Racing are thrilled and proud to announce that reigning MXGP number one and nine times FIM Motocross World Champion Antonio Cairoli will remain part of the team for another two years and through the 2019 and 2020 Grand Prix seasons. The 32 year old Sicilian renewed his contract on Thursday in Rome in the presence of Team Manager Claudio De Carli and KTM Motorsports Director Pit Beirer. The agreement means that Cairoli – who gave the factory their first title in the premier class of the FIM series with the KTM 350 SX-F in 2010 and delivered the KTM 450 SX-F’s first MXGP crown in 2017 – will register eleven years with the brand. The 2018 contest begins next weekend with the first round of nineteen taking place at Neuquen for the Grand Prix of Patagonia Argentina. The South American fixture will mark the beginning of Cairoli’s fifteenth term as a full-time GP rider and his ninth in Red Bull KTM colors. In a remarkable career that boasts nine titles (seven in the premier class since 2009, six with SX-F technology), 213 GP appearances, 83 career wins and 145 podiums (with 163 moto victories) Cairoli is still the reference for the sport as he bids for a record-equaling tenth championship and his first viable ‘defense’ of the No.1 status with the KTM 450 SX-F. “I’m really happy to announce this because we already made history in 2010 with the KTM 350 SX-F against the 450s and succeeded with that challenge. I feel a part of KTM because of that success and since then the company has grown a lot,” commented Cairoli. “I put in a lot of effort to bring titles and I feel very proud to be part of the company. They invest a lot and do a lot of work in development and you see the result because it is the top off-road manufacturer in the world. I’m happy to continue and to do another two years and to try for more titles. I’m fully motivated for the upcoming seasons.” “Around two years ago people were already saying that Tony was getting too old to stay at the top and I took that moment to declare that we had full trust in his skills and capabilities. He had two tough seasons but it was amazing how he bounced back in 2017 and showed that we were absolutely right,” said Pit Beirer. “It made me happy and very proud that he wanted to continue and he wants to keep pushing. I believe Tony has found the right balance in his life - personally and professionally - to keep racing and wanting to achieve. He is very passionate about it and this is why he continues to be so strong. I’m only too happy to make this strong commitment to Tony and very pleased that our MXGP story will go on. I also want to thank and pay credit to Claudio De Carli and his role. He has had a big say in the Cairoli-KTM success over the years and long may it last.” Red Bull KTM Factory Racing head to Argentina in the coming days as world champions in both categories of the FIM Motocross World Championship for the sixth time this decade. www.mxgp.com www.ktm.com | media.ktm.com Facebook | YouTube | Twitter | Instagram
  22. Before we review the five most common mistake that a rider needs to avoid, let’s take a brief look at the physiological demands put on a rider during riding and racing. First, a rider has to “teach” the body to conserve glycogen and burn fatty acids as a primary fuel source. Note, the higher the riding intensity level, the more glycogen (aka stored carbohydrates) your body burns. The downside to higher intensity and the utilization of stored glycogen, is that your body only stores about 60-80 minutes of glycogen within the muscles – not enough to finish strong, hence the need to prepare and train properly (which will be outlined below). With this in mind, it is imperative that the racer focus on maximizing his or her aerobic capacity, both on and off of the motorcycle. When this is implemented properly, the following physiological adaptations take place (which results in better endurance and overall speed): - Improved delivery of oxygen to the working muscles - Lower overall heart rate due to the increased stroke volume of the heart - Improved elimination of lactic acid (a by product of burning carbohydrates) - Increased number of mitochondria (remember in school: “The power house of the cell” In my opinion, one of the most beneficial by-products of endurance training is that it prepares the rider for the psychological demands of racing – especially late in the race when mental focus can make the difference between 1st and 5th place. When you teach yourself to stay mentally sharp, you the rider will be able to make the necessary decisions that will build upon themselves throughout the race. Here’s how. When you don’t mentally drift off, you will consistently consume the necessary fluids and calories (ideally every 15-20 minutes) which will result in stabilized blood sugar levels. When your blood sugar levels are optimized, your brain has the necessary “fuel” to implement the proper techniques that you have worked hard to incorporate into your riding. These proper techniques lead to faster speeds which your brain has to process efficiently throughout the entire race. If your brain runs out of fuel, you will find yourself missing your important lines, resulting in slower average speeds and ultimately more work and fatigue on your body as it fights the non-optimal lines. You can see how this becomes a problem quite quickly. Here are few things you want to avoid to enjoy your riding and/or improve your race results: Mistake #1: Deviating from your regular routine When it comes to getting the body warmed up sufficiently and properly, it needs to be subjected to the same exercise protocols that are used in training when away from the track. For example, it doesn't make any sense to expect a bicycle to be a sufficient warm-up tool if you're using something like the Concept 2 rower in your every day workouts. You also need to consider intensity levels. We don't want the intensity to be so high during the warm-up that is that it ends up leaving the body tired, but we also don't want the heart rate to not rise to a level that starts to produce and activate the lactic acid shuffle. What we see is either riders are using the wrong tools to warm up or they're warming up at too high of an intensity. Mistake #2: Coming to the starting line dehydrated or under nourished When you sleep at night; your body pulls the necessary glycogen (which is sugar) from your liver to sustain your brain functions during the night. Then when you wake up in the morning and put demands on the muscles, the energy necessary comes from the glycogen that's been stored within the belly of the muscle tissue. The challenge that we have on race day is the duration of time since your last meal - sometimes between 12 to 15 hours. Think about race weekends: you're going to be racing on Sunday morning and practice or racing begins at 7:00 am. Let’s say that you ate dinner at 6:00pm Saturday night and you wake up at 6:00am Sunday morning, that's 12 hours since your last meal. To put it in perspective, imagine that if you ate your morning breakfast at 8:00 in the morning, but then you didn't eat dinner until 8:00 pm and you had no snacks or any meals in between that timeframe, you'd be extremely hungry. But for some reason (whether we chalk it up to a nervous stomach or we're afraid that we're going to get cramps) we don't take the time to eat a good-sized meal early enough so the muscle glycogen is already at a deficit before the gate drops. When you add high intensity racing, which tends to drain the glycogen from the tissue very quickly, and you can see why riders have a tendency to fade quickly or miss simple lines – all because the blood sugar levels within the rider is too low. Frequently this fade or silly mistake syndrome is blamed on a lack of fitness, but rather, should be attributed to low blood sugar levels. Mistake #3: Lack of a post-race recovery routine When you come off the race track, there's an enzyme that helps you replenish glycogen within the muscle and the liver called the Glycogen Synthase Enzyme. You've got about 20 to 30 minutes where that enzyme is at its highest level, so when a riders comes off the track, the first thing they need to be focusing on is the replenishment of depleted glycogen. For example, if you took a bit of oil out of the engine after each lap, you wouldn’t expect the engine to still be running strong at the end of the race. The idea here is that every lap depletes some level of glycogen (the exact amount is based on the duration and intensity level) and it's the athlete's responsibility to get the body replenished to perform at an optimum level. Whether its 20 minutes later, 30 minutes later, whenever your next race is, you have to understand that as soon as you come off the track, priority number one is to get that body replenished and to get it rehydrated. Failure to do so is going to manifest itself out on the track as you start to fade and go backwards. Again, we're right back to an empty gas tank within the muscle. If you want to be able to perform optimally, moto after moto, day after day, it starts after each race or workout – so plan ahead and implement consistently. Mistake #4: Racing at an intensity that is not familiar to your body This mistake is not a misprint – many racers fail to race to their full potential by riding too hard - too early in a race! It is obvious that on race day you're going to be pushing a pace that's difficult to emulate during training, but training at an intensity level that's much less than the demands of race day leads to a culture shock to the body. It produces more lactic acid than the body has been acclimated to and the physiologic process of absorbing and diffusing lactic acid shuts the muscles down. The end result is that the contractions of the muscles are slowed down, you begin to focus on how bad your body is hurting and instead of focusing on racing the course, and you begin to make errors on the course that begins to negatively affect your confidence. To offset this negative effect of lactic acid, you want to try to incorporate a couple of workouts a week that is held at an intensity level on the motorcycle that will accurately emulate race intensity. Additionally, you need to make sure you are testing and training at the same intensity levels off the motorcycle with various forms of cross-training. If you want to race at a higher level on the race weekend, incorporate similar conditions and intensities when you're practicing on the motorcycle along with your cross training off of the motorcycle. Mistake #5: Not racing the track The final and biggest problem that we see on the race day is racers shifting their focus from preparation and implementation of a normal routine to who is on the gate. The rider begins to size themselves up against somebody else and then pulls in a past performance of the other rider, and then immediately dumps that information into the race at hand. Your goal is to make the least number of mistakes, carry as much momentum as possible and charge the course. If somebody else is jumping something, they think they need to jump it. My question is why you don’t just focus on racing your race; race every section as hard and as fast as you can, try to optimize every single section of the course and your goal is that you would do it faster and better than everybody else. It's not that you can't learn something from somebody else, but when the gate drops, the only thing that you can take control of is yourself. So, what I want you to be thinking about is how I can get through this section faster than anybody else. Frequently, this requires thinking outside the box. When another rider is doing something through a section that nobody else has thought about, and probably not even willing to try, the results speak for themselves. Be smart, but creative and you will be surprised at the outcome. If you really want to optimize your fitness and preparation, you want to create the mindset that you are racing the course - minute after minute with your pace falling off as minimal as possible. We don't want you to come around the course on the opening lap with a time of 2:00 and then fall off to a 2:15. Ideally we are looking for less than a 2 second deviation from your first to last lap - you've seen this emulated by the best racers. The only way you can do this, is to race the course, minimize mistakes and make the best of something when it goes wrong. Allowing frustration and anger to sidetrack your focus, doesn’t fix the fact that you've messed up a section. Re-establish your timing; get back to charge mode and carry as much momentum as possible to create the fastest lap times on the course. Remember, practice doesn’t make perfect. Perfect practice makes perfect! If you have any questions or are interested in a customized nutrition and performance program, please feel free to contact me directly at Robb@CoachRobb.com. Also, don't forget to hit that "follow" button! Yours in sport and health, -Coach Robb
  23. Speed-Freek

    The "Official" Pala MX thread

    So figured I would start a thread, going to Pala on Sunday, probably gonna to get lapped random kids on 65cc 2 smokers... Anybody else down to go? I'll be on my clapped out 05' YZ250, white bike with no stickers.
  24. tmracinggeorgia

    2017 TM 250 MX

    Hey, guys. Just wanted to share a pic of our 250. If you have any questions give us a shout. It's also for sale! tmracinggeorgia@yahoo.com
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