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Found 131 results

  1. This is the saga of my poorly maintained 2003 YZ250 that I bought about a year ago. I added a few mods last summer to help me get by then deployed to Africa for 6 months. The poor bike was riddled with SAE hardware, spray foam where there should have been gaskets, and ziptied rear fender, a horribly cut seat, and plenty of other unspeakable things. However, it came with a title and the engine did run pretty strong at the time...even though it had a hint of engine noise. Over time, the noise progressed and I knew what had to be done. While I was away, I coerced my wife into sending a used crankshaft i bought out to Mr. Crankshaft so I'd have a spare for a quick swap... This is it after I replaced the fuel tank that had a split in it and put a lectron carb on. It still wasn't that smooth and the wheel/tire combination were unforgiving, plus, the suspension and rebound were set for a wanna-be-freestyle MX rider. This is the transition to where it was before I really dove in GT216AA Front with Nitro Mousse 18" Rear with Shinko 505 Cheater rear and Nitro Mousse Low Enduro bend Flexx bars (eventually putting steering dampener on) SSS Forks and suspension done by W.E.R. DEP Armored Enduro Pipe Steahly 9oz Flywheel Weight Devol Skidplate IMS/Zipty tank Non-cracked white rear fender Tall seat...I forget who made it, but it does what it do and fits well. Head cut by 218 (head was cut after this photo was taken) rock kickstand During this ride, I had next to no bottom end due to a stuck powervalve. This was my first ride since I came home. I never really tore into the engine, so I got in there, cleaned it up and replaced a broken powervalve pulley and a few areas where parts were missing from the previous owner(s). Two weeks after this picture, I took it out to the mountains for the fourth of july and it started to get real nasty sounding and not in a good way This is why: While I was in there, I figured I'd send the top end out to Eric Gorr...and since that has a 2.5 week lead time, I might as well get the frame in order. Now my bike looks like this. The frame was spray bombed over who knows what, which was over the the original finish. That is being re-mediated. To be continued...
  2. Hey guys, I just sold my yz80, for $1100. Im down to two choices for a new dirt bike to buy, a 2003 cr125r, or a 2007 rm85 big wheel. I sold my 80 because i outgrew it, and im ready for a faster bike. Im only 5'3, so I know i wont be able to touch both feet on the 125, its got a freestyle seat, so it sits a little lower. Then, the rm85 is a big wheel, but i already outgrew my 80, and i dont know if the rm85 will be much faster. I rode my 80 amazing, i ride enduro/trail and I go to mx tracks to practice often. Let me know on what bike you guys think i should get. (By the way, my brother has a cr125 as well, and ive rode it and control the power well.)
  3. Fun solo ride before the recent Northern Cali storm, lots of fun good conditions
  4. So here we go again.. Previously had a 98 xr100 for my wife that I had setup as a dualsport and got plated here in WA... Well apparently somebody else thought it was pretty awesome and stole it... So now we are doing this again. This time with an 02 xr100. Just picked it up yesterday. Came with a pro circuit t4 system and spark arrestor, Otherwise stock and in really good shape. Wife owned Last 2 owners doesn't look like it was used a whole lot. I like the style a lot better than the older ones (blasphemy I know) Looks more like a mini crf. Last bike I didn't use a battery I think this one I am going to just to make the voltage more stable. Will be going all LED on it. Last one was all led except the headlight and the headlight bulbs were terribly short lived.
  5. Hello, everyone. I thought I'd share my personal experience on this bike considering its so new and very few people actually own one right now. Background (for some context): I'm a 31yr old mechanical engineer/entrepreneur, 6ft, 235lbs, and in okay shape. I've started riding when I was 6 on a Honda Z50, and besides about a 10-year hiatus starting in college, I've been riding since. Rain or shine my daily driver 9/12s of the year is currently a KTM 1190 ADV-R. I take it offroad quite a bit and try to do a 2-week multi-thousand-mile adventure/camping trip two-up with my wife once a year (I'm a lucky bastard). I love the KTM, but it definitely did not convince me to get a KTM dirtbike. The dealer had to rebuild the motor after 4k miles because the airbox looked like it was designed by a 6th grader. A design flaw causes it to flex and let air past the filter. It has a few other annoying quirks, like an undersized starter motor and battery which make it impossible to start sub 40 degrees outside. I feel like KTM pushes the weight/reliability boundary too far. Back to the dirtbike, I'm currently focused on riding in the woods outside of Boston. I don't ride competitively, but many of the guys I currently ride with do. Most are vet A or B riders in their mid-40s and all are a little faster than me. I only recently started riding at a "competitive" pace to try and keep up. Up until last year, I was more focused on finding really technical terrain, like tackling the hardest lines up a steep hill or something. I've been really enjoying this new style of fast pace, more flowy woods riding. My last bike was an '08 CRF450R. I got it originally for doing track days at the MX track. I switched to doing more technical offroad riding and plated it so to easily get from one riding area to the next. The bike was getting old and the suspension was set up way too soft for what I'm doing now so I figured it was time for something new. The timing worked out perfectly with the release of the CRF450RX. I literally couldn't have been more excited to hear of its release. Before the first ride: This is what I did and why: Yoshimura full TI Exhaust: I only got it because it looks awesome. The weight benefits are nice and it supposedly gives you better low to mid power and sounds a bit nicer and quieter than stock. I can't compare it though since I never used the stock pipe. It was extremely easy to install, maybe 10 minutes. They do split the header into 2 parts, unlike the stock pipe. Also, they are longer, and there's a fat section in the area behind the shock. Hear it here: https://www.instagram.com/p/BPQqqvojFX2/ Antigravity 8 cell Lithium battery (P/N: 1388590001): I got this because I figured it was a simple way to drop a few pounds. Install was simple, although I needed to drill out the power terminals on the bike since the bolts are larger for this battery. Acrebris Endurance handguards: These were missing a couple of M6 Hex bolts that hold the bar clamps together. According to reviews I've read, others have had this issue too. As expected, it requires you to cut the end of the handguards to fit them in the bar ends. In doing so, you compromise the adhesion between the rubber grip and plastic throttle tube, which broke free shortly into my ride. The bike didn't come with the little wire that holds down the grips. I was forced to use a couple of small zip ties. Fortunately, when placed correctly, they didn't get in the way. I'll have to clean this up for next ride. 12 tooth front sprocket: We ride in the woods, its very tight, so I figured it needed to be geared down more than just 1 tooth on the rear. So I'm running 12/50. I think its perfect, more on this later. Studded tires from http://www.kevinscycle.com/ These are needed this time of year in New England. The ground is hard and there is still some snow in north facing hills and heavily shaded areas from a storm last weekend. Ride review: I'll break things down to keep things organized. As a heads up, besides the gearing and exhaust, I didn't want to make any changes to the bike until I get more hours on it. I wanted to focus on getting comfortable with it and understand the baseline. I didn't even change the mapping. I feel like doing this really helps me understand subtle changes more easily. Chassis and ergonomics: I feel at home sitting on the bike. The riding position is very comfortable. The pegs, handlebars and seat feel similar to my '08. The biggest difference is how narrow and light it feels. Pivoting the bike left and right is incredibly easy. The bike also looks really small, although I don't feel cramped at all. Everything is exactly where I want it to be. My only complaint is the seat foam. Its way too stiff for anything but the MX track. The seat cover, however, is great, very grippy. The bike turns similarly to the '08 but the front end feels more planted. It really dives and leans into corners well. Still can't get over how light it feels. I swapped rides with friends on a KTM 250 XC-F and 350XC-F and it did not feel an ounce heavier. Both the guys who rode my bike said the same thing. I feel like my bike lays down into corners easier, although I'd say both those bikes feel more stable in a straight line. It's a compromise, but particularly for what we do, I prefer my bike. This is one of the biggest reasons why I wanted to stick to a Honda. There is an intrinsic handling characteristic that's rooted in frame geometry that I prefer. Another thing I noticed is how the bike stays planted under acceleration. The front tire doesn't lift up as easily when getting in it hard. It just explodes forward like nothing I've felt before, almost as if I had a long swingarm on it. This is clearly a benefit of having a lower center of mass and whatever they do to the frame/suspension geometry. I feel like this is what really seperates it from other bikes. I read a review about the frame "blackening" easily after use. This is because they apply a heavy bead blast texture around the lower part of the frame to provide a sticky surface for your boot (or improve adhesion to gripper tape). It's the exact same alloy as in my '08. The "blackening" is from the rubber on my boot. Engine and transmission: My '08 had beryllium-copper valve seats, a heavier flywheel, 12/48 gearing, and a Magura hydraulic clutch. The only change to the RX is the 12/50 gearing. The bike is more powerful and smoother everywhere. The power feels extremely linear, almost electric like. The engine revs really quickly. Twisting the throttle in neutral gives you the impression the flywheel mass is next to nothing. This made me nervous since I tend to stay low in the revs, and it can get very technical in areas. However, it was never an issue. You can really lug it easily. It does idle high which helps. I did stall once or twice but this was from braking before getting on the clutch. The e-start got me going immediately though. Its awesome btw. I never touched the kick start. It was 25 degrees out in the morning, and it fired right up cold with the lithium battery without an issue. All the KTM guys kick start their bike when its cold out. This bike definitely doesn't need it. The clutch feels great. Clutch pull is on the heavy side, but the engagement travel is short. I'm used to the Magura hydraulic clutch which requires you to pull it in more to fully disengage, but with a lighter pull. It took some time getting used to but I was happy with it. It engages and disengages smoothly with a lot of feedback. I don't think I'll get a hydraulic clutch for this bike, I'm really liking the feedback it provides. I gambled a bit with the 12/50 gearing I started with. I figured I'd be better off being geared a little low than a little high. I think this is perfect gearing for the woods. I stuck to 2nd gear most of the day, with a handful of sections in 3rd. I really didn't need first, even when hitting a rutted, tight 180 around a tree. Only a little feathering of the clutch was needed. With this gearing, first works well in really slow stuff. It is definitely a bit lower than the 12/48 set up I had in the '08, not sure what I prefer. I am really happy Honda stuck with a close ratio, I don't like wide ratio boxes in the woods. My only issue is the cam profile on the throttle tube feels a bit aggressive. This was my biggest learning curve on the new bike, took me a solid 20 minutes to get used to the delivery. I think I'll end up liking it since it's much easier to blip the throttle to get the front tire up when needed. We'll see. I could also try the mellow map, buts it's only that first mm of travel that I need to be careful of. I finally figured out why Honda does dual exhausts. You can warm up and dry both hands AT THE SAME TIME!!! Seriously though, I love the way these look, even if the benefits are unclear. Suspension: The suspension is a little too stiff for the riding I do. There are a lot of roots and rocks, and it lacks the plushness on the initial part of the stroke, which was very noticeable when I hoped on the KTMs I rode, as well as the 300 XC-W I'm familiar with. The rest of the stroke is great. It floats well over whoops and resists bottoming over g-outs well. No big jumps or drops yesterday but it feels like it'll do just fine in those cases. I'm not yet convinced I'll need to change the spring rates even though I'm a heavier rider. It never sunk into the stroke, but this may be because its over damped for this kind of riding. I'm going to start with adjusting the clickers on the next ride and go from there. I may have to send them out for a revalve and new springs, we'll see. I'll post more once I start playing with changes. How the KTM guys felt: Eric (on the 250 XC-F): Bike feels great, very light, clutch is nice, the suspension is definitely set-up for the morning. I'd consider one if it was a 250 or 350. Mark (on the 350 XC-F): You need to sit more forward to get that front end planted feeling that I have on my bike, but it really corners great. It's too powerful. I like it otherwise. Best looking bike out there. Overall: It's a well engineered, cohesively designed bike. I run the engineering department at my company and act as the chief engineer on complicated equipment for homeland security markets. The best way to maximize performance and value while minimizing waste and bloat is to get a tightknit group of talented guys who are ultra focused on the same underlying goal and not their immediate tasks, even if it means sacrificing on their on contribution for the benefit of the whole. You can tell this bike was designed with that mentality. It's not about the horsepower, or how light it is. It's how well it functions as a complete package. I absolutely love the bike. Honda hit it out of the park. Bottom line, it was probably the best day of riding I had. Link to picture gallery: https://www.dropbox.com/sc/vl1sbjcp0hr6h8o/AACQX1ySiMWUqbHVBANAKubLa If you guys feel this was useful, I'll post more updates as I get familiar with the bike.
  6. anybody running the gut buster 24 this weekend? It looks to be a good ol mud race. http://www.thegutbuster24.com
  7. I want to get a cheaper used FMF exhaust for my bike. The one on eBay I was looking at had some dents in it. Do dents in the muffler have a big impact on the performance? Also the pipe looks to be turned the wrong way does that rotate? I don't want to buy this if the pipe will not rotate because I think it looks like its turned the wrong way and wouldn't fit.
  8. Went for the first off road ride on the drz after getting it about a week ago. Really loving the torque of this thing compared to the crf250l. Being able to comfortably maintain 70ish and pass grandma is a HUGE plus. It takes about an hour for me to get to the n.f. from my house sooo ordered the seat concepts seat when I got home lol. There seems to be a sweet spot at 56-62 on this bike where it really smooths out. 1---Need to get rid of the trailwings pronto. 2---Maybe because of the extra power but this feels a lot more confident in the heavier stuff than the crf250l did for sure. 3---This bike handles jumps a lot better for a 200lb 6'3" guy lol (a little obvious maybe) I was going a good clip and got to a rough section with some clay mud and boom. Right hooked the ground. The stock bars bent enough that it made it uncomfortable to stand and ride so gimped on home. For anybody interested I really recommend the enduristan bags. They are a little spendy but with the way they roll down to close and the attachment they do not move at all and have stayed dry in water crossings and storms commuting to work. These are the small ones. 'wings don't clean out well huh lol. Clogged up and sent me down. All in all it was a good ride and I am really liking the drz. I find that even with one less gear than I am used to, you can leave it in a higher gear and just grunt along. New bars and hand guards are in the works. I have a wolfman rear bag that I am looking for a rack it will work with.
  9. I guess this is kind of a novice question but may as well ask. Does anyone have any little known tips/ secrets you used to get faster offroad/ enduro races. I find that I mainly struggle with confidence in the wide open type stuff (40-45 mph) and cornering. All help is appreciated? thanks.
  10. I've been riding my 2002 400s with stock 15/44 gearing for a while now. Unfortunately I find myself having to do a lot more highway than I would like to, to get to where I want to ride the dirt. I'm building the bike into a light adventure bike and I don't ride any super technical trails (I don't want to completely lose that ability though) but I do like some so-cal mountain trails. I anticipate a lot more highway miles in the future in order to reach the trails I'd like to ride, also meaning I'll be adding a little weight, camping gear etc.( I am a 150lb rider) I saw a 43t rear sprocket available, would 15/43 make any noticeable difference in my highway rpms (65-75) and how much damage would it do to my abilities on the trail. I would also like to know the same for 15/41 and if anyone can let me know what changes in chain would need to be made. This will be my first time experimenting with a gearing change on any bike that I have owned. Bike has 3/3 mod done, stock exhaust and a JD Jet Kit.
  11. 34 Days and what ever in Beautiful Chile http://www.fim-isde.com/home/
  12. https://www.dirtrider.com/factory-off-road-bikes-manuel-lettenbichlers-ktm-300-xc-w-tpi/
  13. Hey! I have a Honda crf250r 2004 the bike runs smoothly but the only problem I have that if I try to start it it usually takes me around 10 kicks maybe more to get it running. When its warm it kicks first try. When its cold I turn the gas on, the choke, twist the throttle maybe 2-4 times am I doing something wrong? or is something wrong with my bike?
  14. ALTA motors dirt bikes enroute to Erzberg stollen from rest stop in England. The victim is a good bloke that provides a lot of stoke for life on a bike.
  15. So I thought I should create a new thread to dump my vlogs into for the few that do watch them. If you didn't catch my vlogs from last year for 2017, check them out here -> 2017 NMA Series Season 2 is well underway for 2018. This year I'll be racing the Open A class competing in both the NORCS and NMA off-road series as well as the Desert 100 and maybe some other races throughout the year. If you got any questions or recommendations, lets hear them. Enjoy! Northwest Off-Road Championship Series (NORCS) Northwest Motorcycle Association (NMA)
  16. The Trèfle Lozérien AMV Enduro is this weekend. In last year's coverage, the announcers kept talking about a "traditional enduro" format. But they never explained it. In the enduros that I was part of 40+ years ago, they were simple TSD (time speed distance) event, where you had to keep 24 MPH past timing checkpoints. You would get points for being early or late. The Trèfle Lozérien AMV Enduro seems to have timed sections that are run solo, connected by long transit sections. The transit sections don't seem to be timed at all, the riders just ride at modest speed. Is this right? The timed sections are WFO, no attempt at a specific speed. Fastest bike wins. What are the real rules?
  17. Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing Rider Digs Deep for Top-Four Result at Portugal’s Extreme XL Lagares May 13, 2019 – (Motor Sports Newswire) – Graham Jarvis has led home the Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing team at the opening round of the World Enduro Super Series (WESS) in Portugal with a strong fourth place result. With the notoriously challenging Hard Enduro event marking the start of the 2019 WESS season, Jarvis narrowly missed out on a podium result, placing just eight seconds behind the third placed rider after four hours of challenging racing. Defending WESS champion Billy Bolt – who returned to competitive action following injury – finished an impressive fifth, while Alfredo Gomez ended his day in seventh to ensure a strong set of results from the entire Rockstar Energy Husqvarna team. As a three-time winner of Extreme XL Lagares, Graham Jarvis entered the three-day event in confident spirits. In a race where experience counts, the Husqvarna TE 300i rider put in considered and steady performances during Friday and Saturday’s qualifying action, saving himself for Sunday’s main event. Faced with a long two-lap race, Jarvis quietly worked his way up the leaderboard on lap one to position himself for an attack on the podium on lap two. Gaining ground on the early leaders, he worked his way up to second midway around the lap. Frustratingly, a couple of small errors cost him some valuable time, eventually finishing fourth and less than 10 seconds shy of a top-three result. Back to competitive action following a serious leg injury sustained last November, Bolt was keen to gain quality race time. But as the defending WESS champion and winner of the event in 2018, he also wanted to deliver his best. Placing third in Saturday’s City Prologue in Porto showed he was determined to secure a strong result in Sunday’s main race. Starting well, he comfortably held the pace of the top five during lap one. But as fatigued set in during the latter half of lap two he was unable to make a challenge for the podium yet held on to claim a well-deserved fifth. Also a three-time winner of the race, Alfredo Gomez was eager to make it a fourth victory in Portugal. Winning the Prologue, the Spaniard set himself up as the fastest seeded rider for Sunday’s Hard Enduro. Setting off first, Gomez was unable to settle into the rhythm of the race and was quickly caught by the chasing pack. Despite trying all he could to up his pace, he ended his day in seventh. The World Enduro Super Series continues with round two, Trefle Lozerien AMV, on May 17-19. Graham Jarvis: “I’m really happy with how things went today, especially as I haven’t really been on the bike for the past two weeks due to some niggling little injuries. I was feeling a bit tense on the first lap but loosened up on the second and was able to up my pace a little. The bike felt great today and I was really able to attack the gnarly stuff – some of it I was able to get up in one go. The course was as challenging as ever – there was even a new gully for this year that was about half a mile long. I had fun though and it feels good to get a top result, even if I did just miss out on the podium. I’m looking forward to my next race now and hopefully I can get a similar result, or better.” Billy Bolt: “I’m so happy with my result, it’s been a long three days, but I got to the finish. I didn’t really have a plan coming into today’s race, I just wanted to try and stick with the other guys for as long as I could. My pace on the first lap was good, I just didn’t quite have the energy to keep up when we got back into the technical stuff on the second lap. I gritted my teeth and kept going, but it was quite a lonely second lap to be honest. I’m over the moon with the result – it feels like a win. Six weeks ago, it didn’t look like I would be ready to ride here after my injury, so to be able to finish with such a strong result feels amazing.” Alfredo Gomez: “It was very tricky out there, one of the toughest day’s riding I have had for a long time. It was so slippery, and I had quite a few crashes. I set off first and unfortunately lost sometime early on when I made a mistake. I think three riders passed me and then we got into the first river and I struggled to stay with them. It’s a shame because yesterday my pace was so good and to come away with the Prologue win felt great. Today I just couldn’t get comfortable with things. We have a week until the next race so I will try to recover as best as I can and get prepared for France.” Results – WESS Round 1: Toyota Porto Extreme XL Lagares Mario Roman (Sherco) 4:01:43.21 Wade Young (Sherco) 4:05:59.04 +4:15.83 Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM) 4:07:09.68 +5:26.47 Graham Jarvis (Husqvarna) 4:07:16.12 +5:32.91 Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 4:15:19.68 +13:36.47 Jonny Walker (KTM) 4:29:26.58 +27:43.37 Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 4:34:51.08 +33:07.87 Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 4:53:58.02 +52:14.81 Travis Teasdale (KTM) 5:01:43.91 +1:00:00.70 Jonathan Richardson (Husqvarna) 5:11:22.83 +1:09:39.70 2019 World Enduro Super Series Standings (after round 1) Mario Roman (Sherco) 1000 points Wade Young (Sherco) 850 pts Manuel Lettenbichler (KTM) 770 pts Graham Jarvis (Husqvarna) 690 pts. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 610 pts Jonny Walker (KTM) 570 pts Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 530 pts Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 490 pts Travis Teasdale (KTM) 460 pts Jonathan Richardson (Husqvarna) 430 pts Husqvarna Motorcycles. Tradition on two wheels since 1903. Husqvarna Motorcycles are widely known and respected in the off-road world for a heritage of competition and numerous motocross and enduro world championships. Originally founded in Sweden in 1903, Husqvarna Motorcycles have been designed and manufactured in Mattighofen, Austria since 2013. Rockstar Energy Drink Rockstar Energy Drink is designed for those who lead active lifestyles – from Athletes to Rockstars. Available in over 20 flavors at convenience and grocery outlets in over 30 countries, Rockstar supports the Rockstar lifestyle across the globe through Action Sports, Motor Sports, and Live Music. For more information visit: www.RockstarEnergy.com
  18. story time So i have always been told that a Flywheel weight is the tits on a yz250, so naturally, i installed one within a month of owning my new blue monster. The YZ250 is a genuinely incredible machine and making it as luggable as a diesel was a really great decision. It makes cornering, traction and so many other parts of riding alot easier. Its easy to see why even the top riders of back in the day used them as a mod. i chose the 11 oz size by Steahly. Today i was riding at AJS motocross in Western Australia when the engine completely went on me. I thought i had blown the bike and i was fairly upset as i had a week of riding planned ahead of me. I spent a couple hours stripping the bike down but found the motor itself in reasonable condition. What had happened instead was the flywheel weight had come a little loose (like there is absolutely no room in that flywheel bay. the 11 oz leaves zero space left before it hits the cover) and wedged itself on the cover. This was what caused the "Seized" engine. I have pretty well destroyed the thread on the flywheel shaft rod thing which ill have to some how fix. This is upsetting as its caused alot of grief and will stop me using that flywheel weight again as its thread is trash and i wont risk that happening again. Is this a common Problem? i torqued the weight properly and checked it after the first ride so its pretty surprising. This was the flywheel weights maybe 5th ride.
  19. January 19, 2020 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Delivering a riding masterclass, Rockstar Energy Husqvarna Factory Racing’s Billy Bolt claimed a hat-trick of victories at round three of the FIM SuperEnduro World Championship in La Coruna, Spain. Also topping the Superpole hot lap, Bolt secured a maximum points haul to return to the top of the championship standings with two rounds remaining. Despite a difficult home round, Spaniard Alfredo Gomez battled hard throughout the night to take fourth and maintain fourth overall in the series. Disappointed with his performance last time out in Germany, Bolt arrived in Spain eager to make amends and deliver a redeeming result. On what was an increasingly slippery and technical course, the Brit looked in command as he rode his Husqvarna FE 350 to victory. Billy Bolt Beginning his night with a blisteringly fast Superpole lap, Billy topped the classification by almost two seconds. Carrying that momentum into the first of the night’s three races, the Brit quickly hit the front of the field on lap two and was never headed. Controlling the race throughout, Bolt claimed the win with a confidence-boosting 11-second margin of victory. Starting from the back of the grid in the reversed start order race two, Billy again worked his way into the lead on lap two. Despite a couple of mistakes in heavy traffic, he kept his cool to take the win. With a clean sweep up for grabs, Bolt duly delivered in the third and final race of the night. After an early battle with rival Jonny Walker, Bolt took the lead on lap four. Racing clear and opening up a sizeable 32-second advantage he took the win, comfortably claiming the top step of the podium and with it the championship leader’s red plate. Looking forward to making a good impression on the leaderboard at his home round, Alfredo Gomez didn’t quite have the night he was hoping for in La Coruna. Despite placing third-quickest in the morning’s timed practice, a crash during his Superpole hot lap qualified him in sixth. Faced with a disadvantaged grid position for races one and three, the Husqvarna rider fought to make the best of his situation on his TE 300i. Alfredo Gomez Fourth in race one and fifth in race three, the Spaniard secured his best result of the night when grid positions were reversed for race two. Capitalising on an outside start, he exited the second corner in fourth position. Finding a strong rhythm, he placed an impressive third to show what could have been if Superpole had gone his way. The FIM SuperEnduro World Championship continues with round four in Budapest, Hungary on February 1, 2020. Billy Bolt: “I’m made up by just how well tonight has gone. It’s the first time I’ve won all three races and taken the Superpole, so all in it’s gone about as perfect as it could have done. After my performance in Germany I wanted to come here and redeem myself. But to be honest, when I walked the course I didn’t expect it to suit me so well. However, as the night progressed I adapted to the changing terrain and conditions. You needed to muscle the bike around in places, but at the same time be calm and patient. I did my best to avoid mistakes and take the opportunities when they came to me. It worked, especially with race three – that felt perfect. Of course there’s still a long way to go in the championship, we’re far from over, but to take maximum points and get the leader’s red plate back is fantastic.” Alfredo Gomez: “I made things difficult for myself when I crashed in the Superpole and ended up sixth. That meant I had a poor gate position and it was difficult to fight in the first corner. In race one I started seventh and recovered to fourth. I managed to capitalise on the reversed grid for race two and exited the second corner in fourth. I found my rhythm pretty quick and took third there. With fifth in race three I ended up fourth overall, but I showed in race two that with a decent start my pace was good.” Results – SuperEnduro World Championship, Round 3 Prestige Overall Classification 1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 63 points; 2. Jonny Walker (KTM) 49pts; 3. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 46pts; 4. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 39pts; 5. Blake Gutzeit (Husqvarna) 29pts… Prestige Race 1 1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 10 laps, 7:26.266; 2. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 7:37:779; 3. Jonny Walker (KTM) 8:01.095; 4. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 9 laps, 7:30.946; 5. Tim Apolle (Sherco) 7:45.406… Prestige Race 2 1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 9 laps, 6:52.472; 2. Jonny Walker (KTM) 6:55.838; 3. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 7:28.350; 4. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 7:29.412; 5. William Hoare (KTM) 7:40.302… Prestige Race 3 1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 10 laps, 7:18.487; 2. Jonny Walker (KTM) 7:51.089; 3. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 7:57.309; 4. Blake Gutzeit (Husqvarna) 9 laps, 7:25.923; 5. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 7:39.290… Championship Standings (After Round 3 of 5) 1. Billy Bolt (Husqvarna) 169pts; 2. Taddy Blazusiak (KTM) 163pts; 3. Jonny Walker (KTM) 136pts; 4. Alfredo Gomez (Husqvarna) 126pts; 5. Blake Gutzeit (Husqvarna) 89pts… Husqvarna Motorcycles. Tradition on two wheels since 1903. Husqvarna Motorcycles are widely known and respected in the offroad world for a heritage of competition and numerous motocross and enduro world championships. Originally founded in Sweden in 1903, Husqvarna Motorcycles have been designed and manufactured in Mattighofen, Austria since 2013. Rockstar Energy Drink Rockstar Energy Drink is designed for those who lead active lifestyles – from Athletes to Rockstars. Available in over 20 flavors at convenience and grocery outlets in over 30 countries, Rockstar supports the Rockstar lifestyle across the globe through Action Sports, Motor Sports, and Live Music. For more information visit: www.RockstarEnergy.com Source: Husqvarna Motorcycles GmbH
  20. Def one of the toughest races in the world. Pulling for my dude Ricky Brabec. Almost got it last year, until big red flamed out. He did a cool iview with keefer a few days ago about the race, challenges etc. He sounds a little concerned with all the customs etc, but hopefully he will git er done! I mean other than the Baja or some dez races, this one is GNARLY. Also would like to see Shorty do well as the past few years have been a learning experience for him and hes now ready to kill. I think this year may also have better tv coverage. Will be cool to watch live, (hopefully). https://www.dakar.com/en/broadcast/tv-broadcast
  21. FactoryONE Sherco has announced two further big name signings for the 2020 season with Steward Baylor Jr. and Grant Baylor joining the Enduro team. The South Carolina natives penned multi-year agreements to ride the SEF 450 Factory model in both the GNCC and NEPG series starting in January 2020. A host of star signings in recent months by the FactoryONE Sherco team is all but complete now with the Baylor brothers following Cody Webb’s big move previously. “I am excited to get on this new bike and see what we can do with it and put it on the box.” Said Grant Baylor on his switch to Sherco machinery. Steward Baylor Jr meanwhile is looking forward to working with the big-thinking FactoryONE race team: “With the new team, I feel like these guys are putting everything in and I am ready to go win some races on these amazing machines.” The Baylor Brothers have seen success at every level winning national and international championships. “I am honestly still in a bit of shock,” said Ron Sallman, FactoryONE team owner. “First Cody Webb, now Steward and Grant Baylor? The brothers provide FactoryONE Sherco with an immediate opportunity to chase championships and be on the box often in two prestigious off-road series’. Stew is fresh off winning the NEPG championship, finishing only a few points ahead of Grant in second place. They both [also] had strong showings at ISDE. I am really looking forward to seeing what they will do in 2020.” “Stew and Grant provide us with a big one-two punch on the East coast,” adds team manager, Wayne Dickert. “GNCC is arguably the largest off-road series in the world based on the total number of participants and fans. This provides Sherco USA with an amazing opportunity to bring the brand front and centre in front of thousands of loyal fans. I am excited to get the new season kicked off.” About FactoryONE Sherco: Team FactoryONE is a multi-time United States AMA championship observed trials team and newly formed enduro team led by some of the top riders in the business. The Trials team is led by 11x AMA Champion Pat Smage on the men’s side; and 6x AMA Champion Louise Forsley on the Women’s side. The trials team consists of 10 riders. The Enduro team is led By Cody Webb on the hard enduro side and Steward and Grant Baylor on the GNCC side. The team features nine total riders competing in disciplines like Hard Enduro, EnduroCross, GNCC and NEPG. https://enduro21.com/index.php/usa/4670-steward-baylor-jr-and-grant-baylor-sign-to-factoryone-sherco-for-2020?fbclid=IwAR3CJOA1lLBBdqmFdxu4vLKRgvNSMsU5kVZqEKyX42eoMQQaxQtuGHGPo4g Kennedy
  22. East and West regional series to decide 2020 U.S. ISDE Club Team members PICKERINGTON, OH – December 18, 2019 – (Motor Sports NewsWire) – Two American Motorcyclist Association-sanctioned International Six Days Enduro Qualifier Series will be used to determine which amateur off-road racers will represent the United States at the 95th edition of the FIM International Six Days Enduro in Rivanazzano Terme, Italy, on Aug. 31-Sept. 5. The 2020 AMA East Region ISDE Qualifier Series and the 2020 AMA West Region ISDE Qualifier Series will consist of three rounds each, beginning in February and ending in May. The 2020 FIM ISDE will be in August or September. “The U.S. ISDE Team is coming off its best-ever results at the 2019 ISDE, and now it’s time to determine which amateur riders will attempt to repeat that success in Italy in 2020,” AMA Off-Road Racing Manager Erek Kudla said. “The qualifier series test racers in race formats similar to the ISDE, and hopefully one of our Club teams will be able to defend the United States’ Club division title next year.” The U.S. ISDE team won the World Trophy and Women’s World Trophy championships at the 2019 ISDE, as well as the Club Cup title. The American Junior World Trophy team placed second in its class. In the 2020 qualifiers, riders receive an overall score for each day of competition and will be ranked by their four highest scores at the end of each series. Selected riders will be organized into seven three-member U.S. Club teams, which includes the overall top seven riders from each of the two qualifier series, as well as the top 40-plus rider from each qualifier series. Five riders are selected by the AMA ISDE Advisory Committee, which also selects the U.S. ISDE Trophy teams. The seven American Club teams compete alongside the three U.S. ISDE World Trophy teams at the event. For more information, call (614) 856-1900, ext. 1245, or visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com/isde. 2019 AMA ISDE Qualifier Series West Feb. 15-16: Taft, Calif., AMA/WORCS Sprint Enduro March 21-22: Red Mountain, Calif., AMA District 37 Sprint Enduro April 18-19: Murphy, Idaho, JSM Adventures East March 28-29: Statesville, N.C., AMA Full Gas Sprint Enduro Series May 2-3: Battle Creek, Mich., AMA Michigan Sprint Enduros May 8-9 (Friday and Saturday): Plantersville, Ala., Southern Enduro Riders Association Source About the American Motorcyclist Association Founded in 1924, the AMA is a not-for-profit member-based association whose mission is to promote the motorcycle lifestyle and protect the future of motorcycling. As the world’s largest motorcycling rights and event sanctioning organization, the AMA advocates for riders’ interests at all levels of government and sanctions thousands of competition and recreational events every year. The AMA also provides money-saving discounts on products and services for its members. Through the AMA Motorcycle Hall of Fame in Pickerington, Ohio, the AMA honors the heroes and heritage of motorcycling. For more information, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com.
  23. If you have not already seen it. PICKERINGTON, Ohio — Nine events in two qualifying series provide more opportunities to secure a spot in the 2020 AMA Extreme Off-Road Grand Championship, the Tennessee Knockout on Aug. 14-16 at the Trials Training Center in Sequatchie, Tenn. The new format and additional events open up 26 more spots at the TKO. “With this new format, more riders can qualify directly to the Saturday afternoon and Sunday races, instead of having to race their way in on Saturday morning,” AMA Off-Road Racing Manager Erek Kudla said. “The nine qualifying events bring extreme off-road competition to regions across the nation, and we welcome back several events to the qualifier schedule that did a great job serving as AMA State Championships in 2019.” Riders can secure starting spots in the Saturday afternoon TKO 2 race based on their participation at any of the qualifying events. The top 10 finishers in each event move directly to the TKO 2 competition. Additionally, the top three riders from each qualifying series — who are not on the “invited riders” list — skip Saturday’s TKO 1 and TKO 2 competitions and compete against the world’s best extreme off-road riders in the Sunday pro races. “When we started the Tennessee Knockout event in 2011, there were just a few extreme off-road racing events taking place,” event organizer Eric Peronnard said. “Now, as we prepare for the tenth edition of the TKO, it’s great to see the popularity of these types of events growing. We are proud to be the host event for the AMA Extreme Off-Road Grand Championship.” For more information about the 2020 AMA Extreme Off-Road Grand Championship/Tennessee Knockout, visit www.americanmotorcyclist.com/racing/extreme-off-road. 2020 AMA Extreme Off-Road East Series Schedule March 28-29: RevLimiter Extreme Enduro, Decatur, Texas May 16-17: Madd Moose, Marquette, Mich. July 4-5: Tough Like RORR, Tamaqua, Pa. July 18-19: Fallen Timbers, Little Hocking, Ohio Aug. 1-2: Battle of the Goats, Taylorsville, N.C. 2020 AMA Extreme Off-Road West Series Schedule Feb. 8: King of the Motos, Lucerne Valley, Calif. March 28-29: RevLimiter Extreme Enduro, Decatur, Texas May 2-3: EnduroFest, Reno, Nev. June 6-7: Last Dog Standing, Devore, Calif. June 20-21: Stix and Stones, Kellogg, Idaho 2020 AMA Extreme Off-Road Grand Championship Aug. 14-16: Trials Training Center, Sequatchie, Tenn.
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