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Found 91 results

  1. Hi all I have a ktm 300 exc 2017, didn’t make any mods, and run it about 20 hours. Last two rides I noticed a knocking sound coming from the engine, that stops on high revs. I have checked all the common causes (that I know of): loss parts and clutch, both are OK. I suspect that the problem is related to a jetting issue, maybe a lean mixture, or maybe it is related to detonation. Did someone encounter this issue? Any ideas? Your help please.
  2. I am 5'5/5'6 134 pounds and 14 years old and am looking to get a new bike. I ride trails and might do some racing. I am coming off a klx140l and have outgrow the bike (power and size). I am looking at yz/kx/rm 125 and kx 100. Lots of riders I know are saying get the 125 and grow into it. But it sounds like a lot of bike. Any suggestions on which bike I should get?
  3. MotoXRacer_19

    AMA Numbers

    Does anyone know how to, or if you can, change your AMA number? The race number, not the full thing.
  4. Brendan Taylor

    CR80RB Please Help

    I found this screw in my Cylinder, and I'm not sure what it is or what it's for. It's a 2001 CR80RB anyone know what it is? It's just a random screw in the side of the cylinder and i dont want to mess with it until im sure what it is.'
  5. RiDiculous

    Street Legal KDX

    I own a 2002 KDX 220R. I'd like to see if I can make it street legal because it'd save me a lot of money. I live in California and since it's a 2002 model, I think I can do this. I just need to know what I'd need to make it street legal, aside from a spark arrestor.
  6. Hello everyone, I have a 1974 Yamaha gt-mx 80cc and recently replaced the crank oil seal and doing so I had to remove the clutch basket and plates. Reinstalling the clutch and bolting it back together with the gasket, I fired her up and threw her into first gear and nothing... There was no acceleration when revving the throttle. Any advice on what it may be, I have tried adjusting the throttle cable but nothing changes and there is no screw/bolt in the clutch for adjusting like other dirtbikes might have. p.s. the clutch and acceleration were working before I took it apart Thanks in advance
  7. In today's post, I'm very excited to share details about my new book,The Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook. As with all of my blogs and technical resources, my goal has been to bring riders clear and concise technical information. My two-stroke book exemplifies this and puts nearly 300 pages of engine building knowledge at your fingertips. I wroteThe Two Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook to be an all-encompassing guide on engine building. From the moment there is doubt about the engine's overall condition to the time the rebuilt engine is broken in, I give you a step-by-step guide to help you work towards a successful build. My aim was to create a definitive resource that hit on all the relevant topics you'll encounter as you proceed through an engine build and take any guesswork out of the equation. Throughout the book, engineering knowledge and practical experience are fused together to detail the how and why behind the way procedures are performed, parts are designed, and engine performance is affected. This is the most important and valuable aspect of the book, and it's something you won't find in a service manual. The book doesn't just tell you to bolt part A to part B, it teaches and explains the correct way assembly procedures should be performed and why it is necessary to do so. It also explains the intricate relationship between parts, where to look for wear patterns, and shows examples of worn and damaged components. If you're interested in making modifications to your engine or if you're curious about how certain modifications affect performance, I wrote an entire chapter dedicated to the subject. Within this chapter a discussion on how performance parts such as expansion chambers, port timing modifications, and cylinder heads alter overall engine performance is included and helpful suggestions are provided to aid you in choosing the correct components for your build, depending on your specific riding needs. If you have a thirst to learn more about how your engine works and a desire to correctly disassemble or assemble an engine to professional standards, you will benefit greatly from this book. Whether a complete beginner or a seasoned builder, with nearly 300 pages and 250 images worth of information, there is fresh and useful knowledge for everyone. There is also valuable material packed into this handbook that doesn't just pertain to the act of building the engine. I include instruction on diagnosing engine problems, sourcing and determining which parts to replace, using precision measuring tools, setting up your workshop, and additional tests and inspections that should be performed when preparing racing engines. If you just want to build your engine back up to stock spec, you are covered. If you want to go the extra mile and prepare a racing engine, you are also covered. In a way, this book allows you to choose your own ending by giving you all the tools and knowledge you need to complete your build at whatever level you decide. As a way to thank you for your support, we're offering TT members 15% off during a special TT pre-sale which runs from now until December 5th (when the book officially launches). Simply follow this link to learn more and order: ThumperTalk Pre-Sale Thanks again for all your support as we've grown DIY Moto Fix from an idea to a thriving community of riders who are passionate about making their machines perform better through their own hard work. Thanks for reading and have a great week. -Paul
  8. Paul Olesen

    How to Separate Your Crankcases The Right Way

    “Splitting the cases” is often referred to as a daunting or undesirable task, but if you are well prepared and properly equipped then it can be a straightforward job. To alleviate any concerns you may have with the task, I want to discuss best practices and share some tips that you may find useful when dealing with crank bearings that utilize an interference fit with the crankshaft. We’ll get started by discussing preparatory items and work through to completing the job. Preparation I always recommend prepping for crankcase separation by thoroughly reviewing the service manual. This is important in case any special instructions are present, such as guidance on how the crankcases should be positioned. Typically, it is advantageous to lift one half off the other in a certain orientation due to the way the gearbox or other components are installed. Secondly, a review of the manual may highlight any specific hardware that must be removed prior to attempting to split the cases. From a tools standpoint, a crankcase splitter tool is a worthy investment because it will help ensure the job goes smoothly. Case splitters are relatively inexpensive and widely available. Alternatively, for the budget conscious or lesser prepared, a case splitter is something that could be fabricated. Whether buying or making, ensure you pick up a model with a protective end cap for the crankshaft or fabricate one. We’ll discuss the end cap later. The other tools required are all fairly standard and include your typical sockets, wrenches, and soft mallets. Wooden blocks or other soft semi-malleable spacers should be selected which level and raise the crankcases off the tabletop. This allows the cases to be positioned so that the split line between the cases lies horizontally and subsequent splitting can be done vertically. This will help ensure evenness of separation as well as reduce the likelihood of components falling out of the cases unexpectedly. As much as shortcuts are desirable, just about everything external to the cases must be removed in order to successfully split the cases. Clutch, stator, crank gear, etc. must be removed prior to case splitting. Your service manual will provide further clarity as to what needs to come off. Technique & Tips Once you’re ready to separate the cases, the first thing we’ll need to do is remove all the crankcase bolts. The crankcase bolts should be removed via any prescribed patterns outlined in the service manual. Since the crankcase bolts are typically several different lengths, ensuring the location of each bolt is well documented is extremely important. As I discussed in my post on keeping track of bolts, the cardboard gasket method or any other you find suitable should be utilized so that the reassembly process is straightforward later on. After the crankcase bolts have been removed, the crankcases should be inspected one final time to ensure no hardware that should have been removed prior is hitchhiking. Trust me, trying to separate cases only to find there is one last forgotten bolt is quite frustrating! Once you’re confident all the necessary hardware has been removed, position the cases on the blocks with the correct half facing up. Next, install the protective cap over the crankshaft. I advise using the cap whether you own a two or four-stroke simply because in both cases it helps preserve the end of the crankshaft. This is of particular importance on four-stroke engines that utilize an oil feed that passes through the crank. Once the crank end is protected, proceed to install the crankcase splitter. Select threaded holes that are as close to equispaced from one another as possible to promote uniform loading of the case splitter. When threading the case splitter studs into the crankcase, make sure you engage at least 1.5 times the diameter of the stud diameter. For example, if the stud is 6mm in diameter make sure at least 9mm of thread engagement length is achieved. This will help ensure the threads are not stripped when you attempt to separate the crankcases. With the crankcase splitter installed begin tensioning the main bolt against the end of the protective cap. Proceed to tighten the bolt until the crankcases begin to separate about a 1/16” (1.5mm). Once separation has occurred, make sure that separation is even all the way around the cases. Due to the way the case splitter loads the cases, the area near the output sprocket tends to lag. Case separation needs to be even so that the dowel pins used to pair the cases together don’t bind. If the output sprocket end of the cases hasn’t separated, use a soft rubber or plastic mallet to gently tap in that area. Tap carefully and only on case areas that appear sturdy. Once you’ve created an even gap, proceed to tension the splitter bolt, tap when necessary, and fully remove the crankcase. Upon separation, make sure that no gearbox components, such as washers, have stuck to the case. What I’ve described is the ideal sequence of events for a successful case separation, however, occasionally the cases won’t be as cooperative. In the past, I’ve had to deal with crankcases where moisture has found its way into the dowel pin bores and corroded the dowel pins. This effectively seizes the dowel pins in their bores and makes the separation job more challenging. If the crankcases are being resilient to separation, stuck dowel pins may be a potential problem. Most dowel pins are located opposite one another and their exact position can often be referenced in the service manual or in the crankcase section of part microfiches. Once the location of the dowel pins has been confirmed, a torch can be used to lightly heat the dowel pin areas. Heat will expand the metal surrounding the dowel pin and aid in freeing up the stuck pin bore. Usually, a few careful rounds of heat, tension on the splitter, and well-placed tapping is enough to free up the pesky cases and get them separated. Alternatively, if the heat does not help, applying a penetrant to the pin bore areas is another option that may help free things up. If you find yourself dealing with stuck cases, the key is to be patient and think through all your options. In these types of situations, most mistakes are avoidable and are usually the result of rushed decisions. Once the cases have been separated, the remaining tasks of removing the gearbox and pushing the crank out of the remaining case half can commence. I hope you’ve enjoyed this write up on crankcase separation and that it makes you more prepared for the job. If you’ve got additional crankcase separation tips that you want to share, please leave a comment below. For additional engine building information, whether two or four-stroke, check out my engine building handbooks. Each handbook is offered in print or digital form, contains over 250 color pictures, detailed instruction from start to finish on full rebuilds, and contains a wealth of information pertaining to diagnostic testing and precision measuring. Thanks and have a great week! -Paul
  9. Hey guys I just bought a bike last night. So the seller said the bike will turn on but then die. We didn't try it because it was really late at night and it was raining (seat was wet). But he said if you bump start it, it will turn on and ride. So what do you think the problem is? I just want to make sure it runs... I probably won't be able to bump start it till Saturday (rain)... It's a four stroke, and I know absolutely nothing about them. Thanks.
  10. 83 yz250

    PLEASE HELP 1983 YZ250

    hey there I've got a 1983 yamaha yz250. this is my first bike and I'm the third owner. the second owner i bought it off off believes the engine was rebuit because the motor pulls stong he says. by the time i pulled up to his house the bike wouldnt start and he said the carb is really clogged up and its been sitting for 8 months. i managed to get him down pretty low so i bought it. $460 CAD so this is the problem. i got my friend to clean the carb since he knows how and it took him about an hour. we then put it back together. we completely drained the fule and went and got premium fuel and i think we used a 40:1 mix ratio. we also flushed the coolant and replaced that with new coolant. we then tried starting thr bike and it didnt start. we thought maybe the engine was flooded so we took out the spark plug and it was wet. sl we dried out the engine and then tried starting it again. it started after about 30 or 40 kicks while holding full throttle. at this point it was about 9pm and we were tired. we drove it around in first gear killed the bike and gave it two kicks and it started up. we then shut off the fuel while and let the bike shut off so we dont flood the engine again. a week later we go to work on it again cause the idle wasn't the best so we cleaned the carb completely, put it back on and it took about 30 mins of me and my friend taking turns kicking the bike to start it up. once it started up we let it warm up gave it a few revs amd then went onto drive it. im new at dirtbiking so i stalled it. gave it two kicks right away and it started we drove it on my street in first gear only and brought the bike back. i stalled it coming to a stop but then gave it 1 kick right away and it started up right away. i then let it idle for a few mins then i stalled trying to move the bike. i was talking to my friend for about 1 minute and kicked it again and it didnt start. we had to spend another 30 minutes kicking it to start it again. and once we started it we did the same thing. drove it then killed the engine and gave it two kicks right away and it started. after that we killed it waited 1 minute and it wont start again. so basically once the bike is started after an exhausting amount of kicks. u cant shut it off for more than one minute or it won't start again... yes the bike has compression. brand new fuel. brand new spark plug i got it the same day it took alot of kicks to start it. also we tried starting it with the air filter off incase it was dirty but its pretty clean. any help at all will be appreciated and i hope u guys can help me fix this! thanks for your time
  11. I have just put a new transmission in a 2005 kx85, and everything spins freely while the case bolts arent tightened, but as soon as i tighten the case bolts the transmission and crank suddenly become very stiff and hard to move, what could be causing this?
  12. Ok so heres my shot at a bad ass engine conversion and as usual i need a wimter project. Any help or input is appreciated. So i have a rolling chassis 1983 kx80. All the plastics and suspension are in fair condition. I recently purchased a 1992 y250 frankenstein bike. My plan is to stuff the yz250 engine into the kx80 frame and create the kids dream bike. I have a couple yz250 frames in which i am going to cut off the cradle and weld it onto the kx80 frame so it will accept the centerline exhaust. Also the original kx80 frame wouldnt fit the yz250 engine. I will fabricate all new motor mounts except the rear swingarm/motor mount. I will use the kx80 swingarm bolt and get a sleeve fabricated for the yz250 engine to accept the kx80 swingarm bolt. Will need spacers fabricated to align the drivechain. I will get a custom 520 rear sprocket for the kx80(gearing undecided). Will have detailed pics tonight
  13. RustyRamp

    197? Suzuki rm125 questions

    Hey, I'm new to this site and was wondering if anyone can answer a few of my questions about a bike I just picked up. First off I'm unsure of the exact year of this bike. I'm guessing 1976 - 79 but can't quite tell. I need to put crank case oil in it too, what type oil would you recommend and how much? Cheers
  14. Nuklhed

    Is 50:1 really 39.4:1?

    I might be the smartest, dumb-guy or the dumbest smart-guy--I'm not sure. Help me. Premix ratios seem to assume that a gallon of gas weighs the same as a gallon of water...128 ounces. In reality, gasoline is less dense than water. For the sake of argument, the Department of Energy had a blurb that stated one gallon weighs 6.3 pounds...100.8 ounces. So, when I mix 2.6 ounces of two-smoke oil in, I'm making a 39.4:1 ratio. A true 50:1 ratio is about 2 ounces. Here it comes: do two stroke oil makers/engine manufacturers factor this in? If so, great. If not, I'm running a fat mixture in my KTM (which it seems just fine with).
  15. I bought a RM125, which is modded out to a 144 and after riding about a lap and a half it starts cutting out at high rpms. I cleaned the carb two or three times put a new spark plug in it and it is still cutting out. Also checked the reeds and they seem to be in great shape. Thought about swapping the stator with one I know works and trying that out. Anyone have suggestions? I have a video from my GoPro of it cutting out and bogging down but I can’t seem to upload it. Thanks for any input!
  16. Whether you're a seasoned wrench who justs wants to compare notes or a top-end rebuild No0b, here's a great article on the subject, including pics. Give it a read, share any comments in the comment section, and share with an any 2 stroke ridin' buds that might benefit from it. https://thumpertalk.com/articles/how-to-rebuild-the-top-end-in-your-two-stroke-r878/
  17. My rm125 leaks gas when sitting there on the stand with gas off. I've tried cleaning carb to make sure no dirt or anything! Please help! Also my kickstarter is tight when pulling out?
  18. Ghent's05KDX200

    gas tanks

    I ride a 2005 Kawasaki KDX200 and I about ran out of gas on a ride today at a national forest and was wondering if anyone knew if there was a bigger gas tank than the ClarkeMFG 3.6 gallon tank for my bike.
  19. How can I street legalize my CR 85 expert? I was wondering the specifics of what I’ll need to convert my bike to a dual sport. If you could provide me with any information, please do. Thanks!
  20. For the launch of the 2018 Enduro models Husqvarna Motorcycles decided to visit Canada to experience the pioneering spirit. So we've invited 48 media guys from all over the world to Panorama, BC to test ride and experience the new 2-stroke fuel injected models.
  21. Paul Olesen

    New and Re-plated Cylinder Prep

    Today I want to share some pointers on preparing new or re-plated cylinders that will help ensure your engines run stronger and last longer. Plus, I've got an update on the two-stroke book I've been working on that I'd like to share. Let's get started! A Universal Concern First, both new and re-plated cylinders must be cleaned prior to assembling. Normally the cylinders will arrive looking clean, but looks can be deceiving. I have no doubt that the factories and re-plating services clean the cylinders as part of their processes, but I highly recommend cleaning the bores a final time prior to use. Shown below is a new Yamaha cylinder that I extracted quite a bit of honing grit out of. If left in place, the honing grit will ensure that the piston rings will wear out faster than they need to, so be sure to take the time to properly clean new cylinders prior to assembly. What’s the best way to clean the cylinder bore? Start by using warm soapy water and a brush to clean the cylinder. Take your time and be thorough. After the majority of the honing grit has been removed switch to automatic transmission fluid and a lint free rag for one final cleaning. As a test to check cleanliness, rub a cotton swab against the cylinder bore. If the swab picks up any debris and changes color, your cleaning duties are not over. The swab should be able to be rubbed against the bore and remain perfectly clean. Two-Stroke Port Dressing For two-stroke owners, the second item I want to bring to your attention is port dressing. Port dressing is a term used to describe the process of deburring/breaking the edge at the intersection of the cylinder plating and the ports in the cylinder. During the plating process, plating usually builds up excessively at the edge of the port and must be removed after honing. Proper removal is critical to ensure acceptable piston ring life. Manufacturers and plating services will break the edge in different ways and to different magnitudes, which ends up being a whole other topic. The important thing is to ensure that any new or re-plated cylinder you use shows visible signs that the port edges have been dressed. A dressed port edge will be easy to spot because it will feature a different surface finish than the cross-hatch created from honing. This is easily visible in the image shown above. Many port dressing operations are done manually so some irregularity in the geometry will usually be present. If there is no visible edge break on the port edges, I would be highly suspicious and contact the service that plated the cylinder or sold the cylinder and confirm with them if a step was missed. Typically a chamfer or radius in the .020 - .040” (0.5 - 1mm) range is used. Two-Stroke Power Valves Lastly, it is possible that some of the power valve components, such as blades or drums, will not fit correctly on cylinders that have been replated. This is because the plating can occasionally build up in the slots or bores where the power valve parts reside. Prior to final assembly, be sure to check the function of the power valve blade and/or drums to ensure they move freely in their respective locations within the cylinder. If plating has built up in a power valve slot or bore, it will need to be carefully removed. To do this, appropriately sized burs for die grinders or Dremel tools can be used. If one is not careful, irreversible damage to the slot or bore can result. When performing this work proceed cautiously or leave it to a seasoned professional. Burs for the job can be difficult to track down in stores, but are readily available online from places like McMaster-Carr. When purchasing burs, be sure to pick up a few variants, such as rounded and square edged, designed for removing hard materials. The Two-Stroke Book From February to March we photographed the entire book. From April onward we have been formatting and proofreading. Needless to say, we are in the final stretch! If you want to stay updated on the moment the Two-Stroke Dirt Bike Engine Building Handbook is ready for pre-order, sign up at the link below. We can't wait to get this book out the door and into your garage. Sign Up for Updates on the Two-Stroke Book Thanks for reading and have a great rest of your week! -Paul
  22. Paul Olesen

    Maintenance Readiness

    I hope you all have been out riding and enjoying spring. I got back into the hare scramble racing scene over the weekend after a three year hiatus and had a blast. Today, I just want to share a quick tip and start a discussion on preparatory things that help shorten the time it takes to do complex maintenance tasks, such as rebuilding an engine. Quick Tip Prior to turning a wrench carefully look over the service manual scanning through all the applicable procedures and subsystems. If I’m working on an unfamiliar model, I find it is helpful to jot down a rough outline of the disassembly sequence. This saves me time in the long run as I don’t have to rely as heavily on the service manual or continually flip through various sections. Another option is to use post-it notes to bookmark each relevant section in the manual. Mark the post-it notes with numbers or headings so you know where to turn to next. Earmarking or bookmarking the torque tables is also a huge time saver no matter the task. Be sure to scan through the manual as well to identify any specialty tools that are required that you may not have. Discussion Points What other preparatory things can be done to help speed up the major maintenance process? Is there a method to your madness or do you dive right in? Thanks for reading! Paul https://www.diymotofix.com/
  23. Bike is a 1999 Suzuki RM125. I had the crankshaft rebuilt, so during the install I had put in new crank bearings, new crank seals, new case gasket, new reeds, and a new top end. I also cleaned the carb and put in the recommended jets for my exhaust and elevation/temperature. I run 32:1 fuel mix. I also put in a new primary gear, which is what contacts the oil seal. I put axle grease into the seal before inserting the primary gear. The bike smokes more than it should, and I'm pretty sure the cause is that transmission oil is leaking into the crankshaft area and eventually getting into the cylinder. I would top off the oil and check the level with the little bolt on the side of the clutch cover. After a while of riding I would take the bolt out and I would have to tip the bike quite a bit for anything to come out. I don't understand why it could leak. I also topped off the coolant, and the level stayed the same, so that's not leaking. Do you think its still getting in through the seal? If not, where could it get in from? There was quite a discussion as to the orientation of the seal itself here, but since that post I have installed a new seal with spring side out (which is different than most bikes, but I think that's what the manual says).
  24. Scott L.

    2006 Honda CR125 Tranny Oil

    Hello, I recently picked up a 2006 Honda CR125R coming from a 2008 Yamaha yz85. In my YZ85, I normally ran 10w30 oil in the transmission. I used some top notch expensive stuff once but could not afford to pay $25 for oil since I ride trails and change the oil pretty much every 3 rides. In my 2006 Honda CR125, could I run the 10w30? Or is 10w40 better since my bike is older? Like I said, I ride trails. I mostly stay in the first 3 gears. I would MOSTLY like to know if either 10w30 or 10w40 is better considering I have both in my garage. Any help is appreciated! Thanks
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